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Definitions of bank

  1. do business with a bank or keep an account at a bank; "Where do you bank in this town?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a flight maneuver; aircraft tips laterally about its longitudinal axis (especially in turning); "the plane went into a steep bank" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a building in which commercial banking is transacted; "the bank is on the corner of Nassau and Witherspoon" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a container (usually with a slot in the top) for keeping money at home; "the coin bank was empty" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a financial institution that accepts deposits and channels the money into lending activities; "he cashed a check at the bank"; "that bank holds the mortgage on my home" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. an arrangement of similar objects in a row or in tiers; "he operated a bank of switches" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a long ridge or pile; "a huge bank of earth" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. sloping land (especially the slope beside a body of water); "they pulled the canoe up on the bank"; "he sat on the bank of the river and watched the currents" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a slope in the turn of a road or track; the outside is higher than the inside in order to reduce the effects of centrifugal force Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. the funds held by a gambling house or the dealer in some gambling games; "he tried to break the bank at Monte Carlo" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. have confidence or faith in; "We can trust in God"; "Rely on your friends"; "bank on your good education"; "I swear by my grandmother's recipes" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. enclose with a bank; "bank roads" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. a supply or stock held in reserve for future use (especially in emergencies) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. cover with ashes so to control the rate of burning; "bank a fire" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. tip laterally; "the pilot had to bank the aircraft" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. put into a bank account; "She deposites her paycheck every month" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. be in the banking business Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. act as the banker in a game or in gambling Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19. A bench; a high seat, or seat of distinction or judgment; a tribunal or court. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A mound, pile, or ridge of earth, raised above the surrounding level; hence, anything shaped like a mound or ridge of earth; as, a bank of clouds; a bank of snow. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. A steep acclivity, as the slope of a hill, or the side of a ravine. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. The margin of a watercourse; the rising ground bordering a lake, river, or sea, or forming the edge of a cutting, or other hollow. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. An elevation, or rising ground, under the sea; a shoal, shelf, or shallow; as, the banks of Newfoundland. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. The face of the coal at which miners are working. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. A deposit of ore or coal, worked by excavations above water level. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. The ground at the top of a shaft; as, ores are brought to bank. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. To raise a mound or dike about; to inclose, defend, or fortify with a bank; to embank. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. To heap or pile up; as, to bank sand. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. To pass by the banks of. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. A bench, as for rowers in a galley; also, a tier of oars. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. The bench or seat upon which the judges sit. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. The regular term of a court of law, or the full court sitting to hear arguments upon questions of law, as distinguished from a sitting at Nisi Prius, or a court held for jury trials. See Banc. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. A sort of table used by printers. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. A bench, or row of keys belonging to a keyboard, as in an organ. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. An establishment for the custody, loan, exchange, or issue, of money, and for facilitating the transmission of funds by drafts or bills of exchange; an institution incorporated for performing one or more of such functions, or the stockholders (or their representatives, the directors), acting in their corporate capacity. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. The building or office used for banking purposes. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. A fund from deposits or contributions, to be used in transacting business; a joint stock or capital. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. The sum of money or the checks which the dealer or banker has as a fund, from which to draw his stakes and pay his losses. Webster Dictionary DB
  39. In certain games, as dominos, a fund of pieces from which the players are allowed to draw. Webster Dictionary DB
  40. To deposit in a bank. Webster Dictionary DB
  41. To keep a bank; to carry on the business of a banker. Webster Dictionary DB
  42. To deposit money in a bank; to have an account with a banker. Webster Dictionary DB
  43. A group or series of objects arranged near together; as, a bank of electric lamps, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  44. The lateral inclination of an aeroplane as it rounds a curve; as, a bank of 45¡ is easy; a bank of 90¡ is dangerous. Webster Dictionary DB
  45. To tilt sidewise in rounding a curve; - said of a flying machine, an aerocurve, or the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  46. A place for the custody, loan, exchange, or issue of money; the office of a banking company; a heap, mound, or ridge of earth; a steep slope; an elevation or rising ground beneath the sea or at the mouth of a river, forming a shoal or shallow; as, the Banks of Newfoundland; the ground forming the sides of a river or stream; a bench for rowers; a row of oars. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  47. To put, as money, in a bank; to inclose, defend, or fortify with a bank; pile or heap up; to incline (an airplane) laterally, or make to revolve about the fore and aft axis. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  48. To have an account with a banker. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  49. A mound or ridge of earth: the earthy margin of a river, lake, etc.: rising ground in the sea. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  50. To inclose with a bank. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  51. A place where money is deposited: an institution for the keeping, lending, and exchanging, etc., of money. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  52. To deposit in a bank, as money. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  53. A ridge of earth; ground rising from a river, lake, etc. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  54. An establishment where money is deposited. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  55. To put money in a bank. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  56. To raise a bank. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  57. To make into a bank; shelter under a bank; from banks. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  58. A long acclivity; a rising ground. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  59. The land at, the edge of a watercourse. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  60. A shallow; shoal. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  61. To deposit in a bank; do business as or with a bank or banker. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  62. An institution for lending, borrowing, issuing, or caring for money. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  63. A mound or ridge of earth or of sand: a slope on the margin of a river or lake. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  64. An establishment which trades in money, by receiving, lending, exchanging it, &c.; the banking office; a company associated in banking business; a fund; a bench of rowers. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  65. To raise a mound about; to enclose, defend, or fortify with a bank. To bank a fire, to cover up or shut in a fire so that it may burn low. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  66. To deposit money in a bank. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  67. To do banking. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  68. A mound or ridge of earth; any steep ascent; a heap of anything; a place where a collection of money is kept; the margin of a river or the sea. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  69. To raise up a mound of earth or a dyke to enclose; to deposit money in a bank. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  70. 1. A bench or seat; the bench or tribunal occupied by the judges; the seat of judgment; a court. The full bench, or full court; the assembly of all the judges of a court A "sitting in bank" is a meeting of all the judges of a court usually for the purpose of hearing arguments on demurrers, points reserved, motions for new trial, etc., as distingished from the sitting of a single judge at the assises or at nisi prius and from trials at bar. But, in this sense, banc is the more usual form of the word. 2. An institution, of great value in the commercial world, empowered to receive deposits of money, to make loans, aud to issue its promissory notes, (designed to circulate as money, and commonly called "bank-notes" or "bank-bills,") or to perform any one or more of these functions. The term "bank" is usually restricted in its application to an incorporated body ; while a private individual making it his business to conduct banking operations is denominated a "banker." Hobbs v. Bank, 101 Fed. 75, 41 C. C. A. 205; Kiggins v. Munday, 19 Wash. 233, 52 Pac. 85G; Rominger v. Keyes, 73 Ind. 377; Oulton v. Loan Soc., 17 Wall. 117, 21 L. Ed. 018; Hamilton Nat. Bank v. American L. & T. Co.. 00 Neb. 67, 92 N. W. 190; Wells, Fargo & Co. v. Northern Pac. R- Co. (C. C.) 23 Fed. 469. Also the house or place where such business is carried on. Banks in the commercial sense are of three kinds, to-wit: (1) Of deposit; (2) of discount ; (3) of circulation. Strictly speaking, the term "bank" implies a place for the de- (K)sit of money, as that is the most obvious purpose of such an institution. Originally the business of banking consisted only in receiving deposits, such as bullion, plate, and the like, for safe-keeping until the depositor should see fit to draw it out for use, but the business, in the progress of events, was extended, and bankers assumed to discount bills and notes, and to loan money upon mortgage, pawn, or other security, and, at a still later period, to issue notes of their own, Intended as a circulating currency and a medium of exchange, instead of gold and silver. Modern bankers frequently exercise any two or even all three of those functions, but it is still true that an institution prohibited from exercising any more than one of those functions is a bank, in the strictest commercial sense. Oulton v. German Sav. & L. Soc., 17 Wall. 118, 21 L. Ed. 618; Rev. St U. S. thelawdictionary.org
  71. Com. law. 1. A place for the deposit of money. 2. An institution, generally incorporated, authorized to receive deposits of money, to lend money, and to issue promissory notes, usually known by the name of bank notes. 3. Banks are said to be of three kinds, viz : of deposit, of discount, and of circulation; they generally perform all these operatious. Vide Metc. & Perk. Dig. Banks and Banking. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  72. The lateral inclination of an aas, a bank of 45bank of 90. dictgcide_fs
  73. The tilt of a roadway or railroad, at a curve in the road, designed to counteract centrifugal forces acting on vehicles moving rapiudly around the curve, thus reducing the danger of overturning during a turn. dictgcide_fs
  74. To build (a roadway or railroad) with an inclination at a curve in the road, so as to counteract centrifugal forces acting on vehicles moving rapiudly around the curve, thus reducing the danger of vehicles overturning at a curve; as, the raceway was steeply banked at the curves. dictgcide_fs
  75. A fund to be used in transacting business, especially a joint stock or capital. dictgcide_fs
  76. In certain games, as dominos, a fund of pieces from which the players are allowed to draw; in Monopoly, the fund of money used to pay bonuses due to the players, or to which they pay fines. dictgcide_fs
  77. a place where something is stored and held available for future use; dictgcide_fs
  78. To tilt sidewise in rounding a curve; said of a flying machine, an a dictgcide_fs
  79. bangk, n. a mound or ridge of earth: the earthy margin of a river, lake, &c.: the raised edge of a road, railway cutting, &c.: (min.) the surface at the pit-mouth, as in banksman: rising ground in the sea.--v.t. to enclose with a bank: to deposit or pile up: to make up a fire by covering it with a heap of fuel so pressed down as to remain a long time burning slowly--banked fires.--n. BANKS'MAN, an overseer at a pit-mouth.--FROM BANK TO BANK, from the time the collier begins to descend the pit for his spell of work till he reaches the top again. [M. E. banke, of Scand. origin; cog. with BANK, BENCH.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  80. bangk, n. a bench in a galley: a tier or rank of oars: the bench on which judges sat. [O. Fr. banc, of Teut. origin, cog. with the foregoing word.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  81. bangk, n. a place where money is deposited: an institution for the keeping, lending, and exchanging, &c. of money: in games of hazard, the money the proprietor, who plays against all the others, has before him.--v.t. to deposit in a bank, as money.--ns. BANK'-[=A]'GENT, the head of a branch bank; BANK'-BILL, a bill drawn by one bank upon another, payable at a future date, or on demand; BANK'-CHEQUE, an order to pay issued upon a bank; BANK'ER, one who keeps a bank: one employed in banking business:--fem. BANK'ERESS; BANK'-HOL'IDAY, a day on which banks are legally closed, bills falling due on these being payable the following day; BANK'ING, the business of a banker.--adj. pertaining to a bank.--ns. BANK'-NOTE, a note issued by a bank, which passes as money, being payable to bearer on demand; BANK'-PAP'ER, bank-notes in circulation; BANK'-STOCK, a share or shares in the capital stock of a bank; BRANCH'-BANK, a branch office of a bank; SAV'INGS-BANK, one intended originally to develop a spirit of saving amongst the poor.--BANK ANNUITIES, the consolidated three per cent. annuities--British Government funds.--BANK OF ISSUE, one that issues its own notes, or promises to pay; JOINT-STOCK BANK, one of which the capital is subscribed by a large number of shareholders; PRIVATE BANK, one carried on by any number of persons less than ten.--TO BREAK THE BANK, to win, as in faro, from the management a certain sum which has been fixed upon as the limit the bank is willing to lose on any one day; TO PLAY AGAINST THE BANK, to take the risks of a game against the manager who holds the bank, as at rouge-et-noir, &c. [Fr. banque, of Teut. origin, cog. with two foregoing words.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  82. Raised shelf of ground, slope, elevation in sea or river bed; flat-topped mass of cloud, snow, &c. Sloping margin of river, ground near river (right, left, b., to one looking down stream); edge of hollow place (e.g. top of shaft in mining). [middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  83. Contain as a b., confine with bank (s); confine watch-escapement (of banking-pins), strike against the banking-pins (or abs.; of escapement); b. up, heap or rise into bb. (snow, clouds), pack tightly (fire, for slow burning). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  84. Establishment for custody of money, which it pays out on customer\'s order; The B., B. of England, managing the public debt, receiving the revenue, issuing legal-tender notes, & having the Government for chief customer; (Gaming) amount of money before keeper of table; b-bill, drawn by one b. on another; b-book, containing customer\'s private copy of his account with b.; b.-credit, arrangement by which customer may overdraw on security given; b. holiday, day on which bb. are legally closed, usu. kept as general holiday also; b.-note, banker\'s promissory note payable to bearer on demand& serving as money; b.-rate, announced percentage at which B. of England is prepared to discount bills. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  85. Keep b., trade in money (banking-house, commercial firm that does some banking); keep money at b.; deposit (money &c.)at b.; convert into money; (Gaming) hold table fund. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  86. Galley-rower\'s bench; tier of oars in galley; row of organ keys; working-table in some trades. [middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  87. n. [Anglo-Saxon] A bench ; a ridge of earth ;-an acclivity ;-an elevation in the sea : a shoal ;-the side of a river or lake ;-a stock of money deposited for use;- place where money is deposited ;-a private or incorporated banking company. Cabinet Dictionary
  88. The earth rising on each side of a water; any heap of earth piled up; a bench of rowers; a place where money is laid up to be called for occasionally; the company of persons concerned in managing a bank. Complete Dictionary

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