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Definitions of circle

  1. an unofficial association of people or groups; "the smart set goes there"; "they were an angry lot" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. be around; "Developments surround the town"; "The river encircles the village" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. movement once around a course; "he drove an extra lap just for insurance" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. any circular or rotating mechanism; "the machine punched out metal circles" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a curved section or tier of seats in a hall or theater or opera house; usually the first tier above the orchestra; "they had excellent seats in the dress circle" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a road junction at which traffic streams circularly around a central island; "the accident blocked all traffic at the rotary" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. ellipse in which the two axes are of equal length; a plane curve generated by one point moving at a constant distance from a fixed point; "he calculated the circumference of the circle" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. something approximating the shape of a circle; "the chairs were arranged in a circle" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. form a circle around; "encircle the errors" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. travel around something; "circle the globe" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. move in circles Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. street names for flunitrazepan Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. A plane figure, bounded by a single curve line called its circumference, every part of which is equally distant from a point within it, called the center. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. The line that bounds such a figure; a circumference; a ring. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. An instrument of observation, the graduated limb of which consists of an entire circle. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. A round body; a sphere; an orb. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Compass; circuit; inclosure. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A company assembled, or conceived to assemble, about a central point of interest, or bound by a common tie; a class or division of society; a coterie; a set. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A circular group of persons; a ring. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A series ending where it begins, and repeating itself. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. A form of argument in which two or more unproved statements are used to prove each other; inconclusive reasoning. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Indirect form of words; circumlocution. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. A territorial division or district. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To move around; to revolve around. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To encompass, as by a circle; to surround; to inclose; to encircle. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To move circularly; to form a circle; to circulate. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. To surround. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  28. A round body; a plane surface bounded by a single curved line called its circumference, every part of which is equally distant from a point within it, called the center; the closed plane curve bounding such a surface; a number of persons or things united by a common bond; something round, as a group of seats in a theater. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  29. To move around; to revolve. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  30. A ring-shaped structure or group of structures. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  31. A continuous curved line of which every point is equally distant from the centre; space inclosed by such line; a ring; company of persons. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  32. To move in a circle. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  33. To move round. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  34. To encircle; move in a circle. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. A plane figure bounded by a curved line called the circumference, everywhere equally distant from a point within called the center; also, the circumference. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. Anything circular; a ring. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. An association; set; coterie; class. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. A plane figure comprehended by a line, every part of which is equally distant from a point within it, called the centre; a circular line, or anything in that form; a round body; a ring; compass; circuit; a series ending where it begins, and perpetually repeated; a number of persons, or things, or ideas considered as connected or drawn together by some central tie or bond; a complete system; a territorial division; an inconclusive form of argument, in which a proposition is disguisedly employed to prove itself. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. To move round; to encircle. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. To move round in a circle. To circle in, to confine; to keep together. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  41. A figure contained by a single curved line called its circumference, every part of which is equally distant from a point within it called the centre; a ring; any round body; the compass or circuit of anything or place; a sphere or station in society; a number of persons, as a circle of friends; a series ending where it begins. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  42. To move round; to encompass; to surround or enclose; to keep together. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  43. s[.e]r'kl, n. a plane figure bounded by one line every point of which is equally distant from a certain point called the centre: the line which bounds the figure: a ring: a planet's orbit: a series ending where it began: a figure in magic; a company surrounding the principal person: those of a certain class or society.--v.t. to move round: to encompass.--v.i. to move in a circle: to stand in a circle.--adjs. CIR'CINATE; CIR'CLED, circular: encircled.--ns. CIR'CLER; CIR'CLET; CIR'CLING, motion in a circle: a revolution.--DRESS' CIR'CLE (see DRESS); FAIR'Y-CIR'CLE, -RING (see FAIRY).--REASONING IN A CIRCLE, assuming what is to be proved as the basis of the argument. [A.S. circul--L. circulus, dim. of circus; allied to A.S. hring, a ring.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  44. Circulus- c. Ciliary, Ciliary ligament-c. of Willis, see Circulus. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  45. [Latin] A plane curve every part of which is equally distant from a point, the centre. C. of Haller, a c. of small arteries (Circulus arterio’sus Halleri) lying in the sclera and surrounding the optic-nerve entrance; also a c. of veins (Circulus venosus Halleri) lying beneath the areola of the nipple. Greater c. of the iris (Circulus iridis major), a circular set of vessels surrounding the circumference of the iris. Lesser c. of the iris (Circulus iridis minor), a set of vessels in the iris surrounding the pupil. C. of Willis (Circulus arteriosus or Circulus), the anastomosing loop of vessels formed at the base of the brain by the anterior cerebral and anterior communicating arteries in front, the two posterior cerebral and the termination of the basilar behind, and the internal carotid and the posterior communicating on each side. Diffusion o., see Diffusion. na
  46. (Line enclosing) perfectly round plane figure (square the c., find square of same area as given c., attempt impossibilities; great, small, c., c. on surface of sphere whose plane passes, does not pass, through sphere\'s centre; POLAR, ARCTIC, ANTARCTIC, c.); (loosely) roundish enclosure; orbit of planet; ring; curved tier of seats at theatre &c. (dress c., upper c., more& less expensive); (Archaeol.) ring of stones as at Stonehenge; period, cycle, round, (come full c., end at starting-point); complete series; (Logic, often vicious c.) fallacy of proving proposition from another that rests on it for proof; action& reaction that intensify each other (often vicious c.); persons grouped round centre of interest; set, coterie, class, (first, upper, cc.; cc. in which one moves); area of influence, action, &c., sphere. Hence circlewise adv. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  47. Encompass (poet.); encompass round, about; move in a c. round, about; be passed round (of wine &c.); (Mil.) sweep round on moving flank (of cavalry, cf. WHEEL); (p.p.) rounded, marked with cc. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  48. A continuous curved line in the shape of a ring, every point of which is equidistant from a common center. For mathematical purposes, a circle is supposed to be divided into 360 equal parts. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  49. Any curved line, structure, or appliance more or less resembling a circle. (1st def.). Appleton's medical dictionary.
  50. A series of similar or related objects, events, etc., so connected as to maintain a common action or produce a common result. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  51. See circuit. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  52. The figure enclosed by this line. Of circles on a sphere those whose planes pass through the centre of the sphere are Great C.; those whose planes do not pass through the centre are Small C. The Arctic and Antarctic C. are parallels of latitude as distant from the north and south poles respectively as the tropics are from the equator, i.e. about 23 28'. Vertical C. are great circles passing through the zenith and nadir; they are therefore at right angles to the horizon. Hour C, or C. of declination, are circles on the great sphere passing through the poles of the heavens. The Galactic C. is the great circle of the heavens to which the course of the Milky [Gr.] Way most nearly conforms. A Meridian C., or Transit C, is a metal circle with its circumference or limb divided into degrees, minutes, etc., fastened to an astronomical telescope whose axis coincides with one of its diameters. It is adjusted so as to move round its axle in the plane of the meridian. It serves for the simultaneous determination of the right ascensions and polar distances of heavenly bodies. A Mural C. (q.v.) [L.] resembles a transit circle, but is mounted in such a manner as to serve only for the determination of the polar distances of heavenly bodies. A Reflecting C. is an instrument constructed on the same principle and destined for the same uses as a sextant, but it is more complete, as the graduated circle is entire and the divisions are carried all round it. A Repeating C. is an instrument designed for the accurate measurement of angles. By a certain mechanical contrivance the observation of the angle is repeated many (say ten) times, and then the arc that is read off is ten times the required angle. The errors in the final result are of two kinds : (1) errors of observation, -these tend to neutralize each other when the observations are numerous; (2) the error in the final reading, -this is divided by the number of observations, i.e. by 10 in the case supposed. It might, therefore, be expected that an angle would be determined by this instrument with extreme accuracy; but practically the repeating circle has not been found to answer the expectation that was formed of it. The Horary C., or Hour C., on a sun-dial, are the lines which show the hours. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  53. The line traced out by a point moving in one plane at a constant distance from a fixed point. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  54. n. A plane figure, bounded by a single curve line called its circumference, every part of which is equally distant from a point within it called the centre; —the line that bounds such a figure; a circumference; —a round body; a sphere; an orb; a ring; —compass; circuit; —the company gathering round, or associated with a person or place; —a never ending series; —a form of reasoning, in which one proposition proves a position, and is itself proved by the same/ Cabinet Dictionary
  55. A curve line continued till it ends where it begun, having all parts equally distant from a common center; the space included in a circular line; a round body, an orb; compass, inclosure; an assembly surrounding the principal person; a company; any series ending as it begins; an inconclusive form of argument, in which the foregoing proposition is proved by the following, and the following inferred from the foregoing; circumlocution. Complete Dictionary

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