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Definitions of deliver

  1. give birth (to a newborn); "My wife had twins yesterday!" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. relinquish possession or control over; "The squatters had to surrender the building after the police moved in" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. from sins, as in religious dogma Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. deliver (a speech, oration, or idea); "The commencement speaker presented a forceful speech that impressed the students" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. utter (an exclamation, noise, etc.); "The students delivered a cry of joy" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. pass down; "render a verdict"; "deliver a judgment" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. bring to a destination, make a delivery; "our local super market delivers" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. throw or hurl, as in baseball; "The pitcher delivered the ball" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. carry out or perform; "deliver an attack", "deliver a blow"; "The boxer drove home a solid left" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. free from harm or evil Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. throw or hurl from the mound to the batter, as in baseball; "The pitcher delivered the ball" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. to surrender someone or something to another; "the guard delivered the criminal to the police"; "render up the prisoners"; "render the town to the enemy"; "fork over the money" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. hand over to the authorities of another country; "They extradited the fugitive to his native country so he could be tried there" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. save from sins Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. To deliberate. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To make over to the knowledge of another; to communicate; to utter; to speak; to impart. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To give forth in action or exercise; to discharge; as, to deliver a blow; to deliver a broadside, or a ball. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To discover; to show. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To admit; to allow to pass. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. Free; nimble; sprightly; active. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To set free from restraint; to set at liberty; to release; to liberate, as from control; to give up; to free; to save; to rescue from evil actual or feared; - often with from or out of; as, to deliver one from captivity, or from fear of death. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To give or transfer; to yield possession or control of; to part with (to); to make over; to commit; to surrender; to resign; - often with up or over, to or into. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To free from, or disburden of, young; to relieve of a child in childbirth; to bring forth; - often with of. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To set free; save; yield possession or control of; carry and hand to an owner; send forth vigorously; discharge; communicate; utter; as, to deliver a speech. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  25. 1. To assist a woman in childbirth. 2. To extract from an enclosed place, as the child from the womb, a tumor from its capsule or surroundings, the crystalline lens in case of cataract, etc. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  26. To liberate or set free from restraint or danger: to rescue from evil or fear: to give up, or part with: to communicate: to pronounce: to give forth, as a blow, etc.: to relieve a woman in childbirth. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  27. DELIVERER. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  28. To set free; rescue; give up; give; utter. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  29. To set free; rescue; save. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. To give; give up; communicate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. To utter; speak formally. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  32. To free from danger or restraint; to rescue; to give; to transfer; to give up; to disburden of a child; to communicate; to pronounce; to give forth; to discharge. To deliver up, to surrender. To deliver over, to give or pass from one to another; to surrender or resign. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  33. To set at liberty; to free; to save; to rescue; to give or transfer, as from one person to another; to utter; to pronounce; to surrender; to disburden or relieve of a child in childbirth. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  34. To set free from restraint; to set at liberty; to release; to liberate, as from control; to give up; to free; to save; to rescue from evil actual or feared; -- often with from or out of; as, to deliver one from captivity, or from fear of death. mso.anu.edu.au
  35. To give or transfer; to yield possession or control of; to part with to; to make over; to commit; to surrender; to resign; -- often with up or over, to or into. mso.anu.edu.au
  36. To free from, or disburden of, young; to relieve of a child in childbirth; to bring forth; -- often with of. mso.anu.edu.au
  37. de-liv'[.e]r, v.t. to liberate or set free from restraint or danger: to rescue from evil or fear: to give up or part with: to communicate: to pronounce: to give forth, as a blow, a ball, &c.: to disburden a woman of a child in childbirth.--adj. DELIV'ERABLE.--ns. DELIV'ERANCE, act of delivering or freeing: act of transferring from one to another: parturition: the utterance of a judgment or authoritative opinion; DELIV'ERER; DELIV'ERY, the act of delivering: a giving up: the act or manner of speaking in public, of discharging a shot, of throwing a cricket-ball, of pouring water, &c.: the act of giving birth.--GENERAL DELIVERY, the delivery of letters from a post-office window to the persons to whom they are addressed--opp. to house to house delivery; GAOL, or JAIL, DELIVERY (see GAOL). [Fr. délivrer--L. de, from, liber[=a]re, to set free--liber, free.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  38. (Prov.) lay, same etymon as the next. 'To put to bed.' To disburden of a child. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  39. [Latin] To free or relieve; especially, to relieve a woman of the contents of the uterus; as to D. of a child. Less properly it is applied to the part taken away, instead of to the person from whom it is taken; as in the expressions to D. the fetus, the placenta, the crystalline lens (in the extraction of cataract). na
  40. Rescue, save, set free from; disburden woman in parturition of child (usu. pass.; also fig., was delivered of a sonnet); unburden oneself (of esp. a long-suppressed opinion &c.) in discourse; give up or over, abandon, resign, hand on to another; distribute (letters) to owners; present (account); (Law) hand over formally (esp. sealed deed to grantee, so seal& d.); launch, aim, (blow, ball, attack; d. battle, accept opportunity of engaging); recite (well-delivered sermon). Hence deliverable a. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  41. To aid in childbirth. American pocket medical dictionary.
  42. To remove, as a fetus, placenta, or lens of the eye. American pocket medical dictionary.
  43. To disburden a pregnant woman of her child. [Fr.] Appleton's medical dictionary.

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