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Definitions of escape

  1. run away from confinement; "The convicted murderer escaped from a high security prison" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. nonperformance of something distasteful (as by deceit or trickery) that you are supposed to do; "his evasion of his clear duty was reprehensible"; "that escape from the consequences is possible but unattractive" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. be incomprehensible to; escape understanding by; "What you are seeing in him eludes me" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. the act of escaping physically; "he made his escape from the mental hospital"; "the canary escaped from its cage"; "his flight was an indication of his guilt" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a means or way of escaping; "hard work was his escape from worry"; "they installed a second hatch as an escape"; "their escape route" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. an avoidance of danger or difficulty; "that was a narrow escape" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. an inclination to retreat from unpleasant realities through diversion or fantasy; "romantic novels were her escape from the stress of daily life"; "his alcohol problem was a form of escapism" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a valve in a container in which pressure can build up (as a steam boiler); it opens automatically when the pressure reaches a dangerous level Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. the unwanted discharge of a fluid from some container; "they tried to stop the escape of gas from the damaged pipe"; "he had to clean up the leak" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a plant originally cultivated but now growing wild Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. issue or leak, as from a small opening; "Gas escaped into the bedroom" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. escape potentially unpleasant consequences; get away with a forbidden action; "She gets away with murder!"; "I couldn't get out from under these responsibilities" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. remove oneself from a familiar environment, usually for pleasure or diversion; "We escaped to our summer house for a few days"; "The president of the company never manages to get away during the summer" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. fail to experience; "Fortunately, I missed the hurricane" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. flee; take to one's heels; cut and run; "If you see this man, run!"; "The burglars escaped before the police showed up" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. An apophyge. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To flee from and avoid; to be saved or exempt from; to shun; to obtain security from; as, to escape danger. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To avoid the notice of; to pass unobserved by; to evade; as, the fact escaped our attention. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To get clear from danger or evil of any form; to be passed without harm. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. The act of fleeing from danger, of evading harm, or of avoiding notice; deliverance from injury or any evil; flight; as, an escape in battle; a narrow escape; also, the means of escape; as, a fire escape. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. That which escapes attention or restraint; a mistake; an oversight; also, transgression. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. A sally. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. The unlawful permission, by a jailer or other custodian, of a prisoner's departure from custody. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. Leakage or outflow, as of steam or a liquid. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. Leakage or loss of currents from the conducting wires, caused by defective insulation. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. A plant which has escaped from cultivation. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. To flee, and become secure from danger; - often followed by from or out of. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. To get free from that which confines or holds; - used of persons or things; as, to escape from prison, from arrest, or from slavery; gas escapes from the pipes; electricity escapes from its conductors. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. To flee from; get out of the way of; to come safely out of; to avoid; to be unaffected by. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  30. To get out of danger; to flow out; to slip away. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  31. A getting away from danger; flight; deliverance. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  32. To flee from: to pass unobserved: to evade. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  33. To flee and become safe from danger: to be passed without harm. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  34. Act of escaping: flight from danger or from prison. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  35. Act of fleeing from; avoidance of harm. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  36. To evade; elude; shun by flight. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  37. To gain safety by flight; be left unharmed. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  38. To flee and get away from. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. To succeed in getting away from something; also, to elude notice. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. A successful flight; deliverance from some evil. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. Issue, as of a fluid; leakage. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  42. The act of fleeing from danger; a being passed without receiving injury; excuse; subterfuge; an evasion of legal restraint or the custody of the sheriff, without due course of law. Escape-warrant, a process addressed to all sheriffs, &c., to capture a runaway prisoner. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  43. To free from and avoid without harm or unobserved; to avoid the danger of. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  44. To flee and be secure from danger; to be passed without harm. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  45. To flee from and avoid; to get out of the way without injury; to shun or evade; to avoid an evil, as punishment; to shun danger or injury. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  46. A getting away from danger; flight; excuse; evasion; subterfuge. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  47. A plant originally cultivated, now found wild. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.
  48. [Middle English] A plant originally cultivated, now found wild. na
  49. To flee, and become secure from danger; -- often followed by from or out of. mso.anu.edu.au
  50. To get free from that which confines or holds; -- used of persons or things; as, to escape from prison, from arrest, or from slavery; gas escapes from the pipes; electricity escapes from its conductors. mso.anu.edu.au
  51. An early system on the IBM 650.[Listed in CACM 2(5):16 (May 1959)]. foldoc_fs
  52. (ESC) ASCII character 27.When sent by the user, escape is often used to abort executionor data entry. When sent by the computer it often starts anescape sequence. foldoc_fs
  53. es-k[=a]p', v.t. to free from: to pass unobserved: to evade: to issue.--v.i. to flee and become safe from danger: to be passed without harm.--n. act of escaping: flight from danger or from prison.--adj. ESCAP'ABLE.--ns. ESCAP[=A]DE', an escape: a mischievous freak; ESC[=A]PE'MENT, act of escaping: means of escape: part of a timepiece connecting the wheelwork with the pendulum or balance, and allowing a tooth to escape at each vibration; ESCAPE'-VALVE, a valve on a boiler so as to let the steam escape when wanted. [O. Fr. escaper (Fr. échapper)--L. ex cappa, (lit.) 'out of one's cape or cloak.'] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  54. Act of escaping; fact of having escaped; leakage (of gas &c.); garden plant growing wild; =FIRE-e.; e.-pipe, -valve, (for e. of steam or water); e. -shaft (for e. of miners when other shaft is blocked). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  55. Get free (from prison, person, &c.); (of steam, fluids, &c.) find a way out; get off safely, go unpunished; (trans.) get clear away from (person, his grasp, &c.), avoid (unpleasant thing, doing); elude notice or recollection of, as his name had escaped me; (of words) issue unawares from (person, his lips). [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  56. n. Act of getting out of danger; flight;—state of being passed by without injury;—act of avoiding notice; evasion; excuse; subterfuge; —freedom from legal restraint or custody. Cabinet Dictionary
  57. To fly, to avoid; to pass unobserved. Complete Dictionary
  58. To fly, to get out of danger. Complete Dictionary
  59. Flight, the act of getting out of danger; in law, violent or privy evasion out of lawful restraint; oversight, mistake. Complete Dictionary

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