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Definitions of flesh

  1. alternative names for the body of a human being; "Leonardo studied the human body"; "he has a strong physique"; "the spirit is willing but the flesh is weak" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a soft moist part of a fruit Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the soft tissue of the body of a vertebrate: mainly muscle tissue and fat Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. The aggregate of the muscles, fat, and other tissues which cover the framework of bones in man and other animals; especially, the muscles. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. Animal food, in distinction from vegetable; meat; especially, the body of beasts and birds used as food, as distinguished from fish. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. The human body, as distinguished from the soul; the corporeal person. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. The human eace; mankind; humanity. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. Human nature The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  9. In a good sense, tenderness of feeling; gentleness. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. In a bad sense, tendency to transient or physical pleasure; desire for sensual gratification; carnality. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. The character under the influence of animal propensities or selfish passions; the soul unmoved by spiritual influences. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Kindred; stock; race. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. The soft, pulpy substance of fruit; also, that part of a root, fruit, and the like, which is fit to be eaten. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To feed with flesh, as an incitement to further exertion; to initiate; -- from the practice of training hawks and dogs by feeding them with the first game they take, or other flesh. Hence, to use upon flesh (as a murderous weapon) so as to draw blood, especially for the first time. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To glut; to satiate; hence, to harden, to accustom. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To remove flesh, membrance, etc., from, as from hides. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. That part of an animal body beneath the skin, composed of soft muscular tissue; animal food; pulp of fruit, etc.; the body: opposite to soul; human nature or race; present life; kindred. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. 1. The meat of animals used for food. 2. Muscular tissue. 3. Adiposity, stoutness. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  19. The tissues of the body, as the muscles, etc. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  20. The soft substance which covers the bones of animals; animal food; the bodies of beasts and birds, not fish; the body, not the soul; animals or animal nature; mankind; bodily appetites; the present life; the soft substance of fruit; the part of a fruit fit to be eaten. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. To train to an appetite for flesh, as dogs for hunting; to accustom; to glut; to use upon flesh, as a sword, esp. for the first time. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. Soft solids of animal bodies; the body; animal nature; mankind; soft substance of fruits. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  23. To accustom to flesh; use upon flesh. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  24. To glut with flesh; satiate; also, to tempt with a taste of flesh, as a dog; embolden with success; flush. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. The softer tissues of an animal body; the soft part of fruits and vegetables; the body as opposed to the soul; the carnal or sinful nature; the human race. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. The soft, solid, muscular part of an animal body; animal food, in distinction from vegetable; the bodies of beasts and birds used as food, distinct from fish; the body, as distinguished from the soul; animal nature; animals of all kinds; mankind; human nature; bodily appetites; a carnal unrenewed state; human nature as it is, without God; the present state of existence; kindred; the soft pulpy substance of fruit. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  27. To train to an appetite for, as hawks or dogs, by feeding them with the first game they take; to harden; to accustom; to satiate. To be one flesh, to be closely united, as in marriage. An arm of flesh, human strength or aid. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  28. That part of an animal underlying the skin or covering, as distinguished from the bones and fluids; the body, as distinguished from the soul; human nature; carnal state; sensual appetite; kindred; family. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  29. Of or like flesh, as flesh-coloured, &c. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  30. in the Old Testament denotes (1) a particular part of the body of man and animals ( Genesis 2:21 ; 41:2 ; Psalms 102:5 , marg.); (2) the whole body ( Psalms 16:9 ); (3) all living things having flesh, and particularly humanity as a whole ( Genesis 6:12 Genesis 6:13 ); (4) mutability and weakness ( 2 Chronicles 32:8 ; Compare Isaiah 31:3 ; Psalms 78:39 ). As suggesting the idea of softness it is used in the expression "heart of flesh" ( Ezekiel 11:19 ). The expression "my flesh and bone" ( Judges 9:2 ; Isaiah 58:7 ) denotes relationship. In the New Testament, besides these it is also used to denote the sinful element of human nature as opposed to the "Spirit" ( Romans 6:19 ; Matthew 16:17 ). Being "in the flesh" means being unrenewed ( Romans 7:5 ; Romans 8:8 Romans 8:9 ), and to live "according to the flesh" is to live and act sinfully ( Romans 8:4 Romans 8:5 Romans 8:7 Romans 8:12 ). This word also denotes the human nature of Christ ( John 1:14 , "The Word was made flesh." Compare also 1 Timothy 3:16 ; Romans 1:3 ). biblestudytools.com
  31. flesh, n. the soft substance which covers the bones of animals: animal food: the bodies of beasts and birds, not fish: the body, not the soul: animals or animal nature: mankind: kindred: bodily appetites: the present life: the soft substance of fruit: the part of a fruit fit to be eaten: (B.) man's visible nature (as opposed to Pneuma or Spirit), his human or bodily nature, the seat of sin, but not originally or necessarily evil.--v.t. to train to an appetite for flesh, as dogs for hunting: to accustom: to glut: to use upon flesh, as a sword, esp. for the first time.--ns. FLESH'-BROTH, broth made by boiling flesh; FLESH'-BRUSH, a brush used for rubbing the skin to excite circulation; FLESH'-COL'OUR, pale red, like the normal colour of the cheek of a child.--adj. FLESHED (flesht), having flesh: fat.--ns. FLESH'ER (Scot.), a butcher; FLESH'-FLY, a fly that deposits its eggs in and feeds on flesh; FLESH'HOOD (Mrs Browning), the state of being in the flesh; FLESH'-HOOK, a hook for drawing flesh from a pot; FLESH'INESS.--n.pl. FLESH'INGS, thin flesh-coloured dress worn by dancers, actors, &c.--adj. FLESH'LESS, without flesh: lean.--ns. FLESH'LINESS; FLESH'LING (Spens.), one wholly devoted to sensuality.--adj. FLESH'LY, corporeal: carnal: not spiritual--also adv. FLESH'LY-MIND'ED, given to sensual pleasures: carnally-minded.--ns. FLESH'-MEAT, flesh of animals used for food; FLESH'MENT (Shak.), act of fleshing or initiating, excitement arising from success; FLESH'MONGER, one who deals in flesh: (Shak.) a procurer, a pimp; FLESH'-POT, a pot or vessel in which flesh is cooked: (fig.) abundance of flesh, high living; FLESH'-POTTERY, sumptuous living; FLESH'-TINT, the tint or colour that best represents the human body; FLESH'-WORM, a worm that feeds on flesh; FLESH'-WOUND, a wound not reaching beyond the flesh.--adj. FLESH'Y, fat: pulpy: plump.--AN ARM OF FLESH, human strength or help; IN THE FLESH, in life, alive: (B.) under control of the lower nature. [A.S. fl['æ]sc; cog. forms in all Teut. languages; Ger. fleisch, &c.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  32. Every soft part of an animal is so named; but more particularly the muscles, which are called muscular flesh. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  33. Muscular tissue or soft tissue resembling muscle in appearance. Proud f., exuberant, projecting granulations of a wound or ulcer. na
  34. Soft substance between the skin& the bones, esp. the muscular part of animal bodies (f. & blood, the body or its material, mankind, human nature with its emotions& infirmities; as adj., actually living, not supernatural or imaginary: one\'s own f. & b., near relations; descendants; f. & fell, the whole body; as adv., entirely; one f., united as one personality, see Gen. ii. 24: proud f., overgrowth of granulations springing on wound: make his f. creep, frighten or horrify him esp. with dread of the supernatural); pulpy substance of fruit or plant; plumpness, fat, (lose f., grow thin; in f., fat); tissue of animal bodies (excluding fish& sometimes fowls) as food, meat, (f.-feeding, f.-eater, &c.; neither FISH, f., nor &c.); visible surface of human body (f.-colour, -ed, yellowish pink); =f. & blood above (all f., whatever has bodily life; in the f., in bodily form, in life; after the f., corporeally); the sensual appetites (sins of the f., unchastity); f.-brush, -glove, for stimulating circulation by rubbing; f.-fly, depositing eggs or larvae in dead f.; f.-pots (w. ref. to Exod. xvi. 3), high living; f. side or f., side of a hide that adjoined the f.; f. tints, esp. painter\'s rendering of f.-colour; f. tights, fleshings; f.-wound, one not reaching bone or vital organ. Hence fleshless a. [West German] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  35. Incite (hound &c.) by taste of blood; initiate in bloodshed; inflame by foretaste of success; use sword &c. for first time on f. (or fig. pen, wit, &c.). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  36. The muscles and other soft parts of animals. American pocket medical dictionary.
  37. Of the animal organism, the bulky soft parts, especially the muscular tissue. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  38. n. [Anglo-Saxon, German] The muscles, fat, &c., covering the framework of bones in animals;—animal food, as distinguished from vegetable;—the flesh of beasts and fowls, as distinguished from fish;—animal nature; animals of all kinds;—the body, as distinguished from the soul;—human nature;—men in general; mankind;—fleshly appetites or tendencies; carnality;—natural or unrenewed state;—corrupt nature or frame of the body;—kindred; stock; race;—the soft pulpy substance of fruit; that part of a root, fruit, &c., which is fit to be eaten. Cabinet Dictionary
  39. The body distinguished from the soul; the muscles distinguished from the skin, bones, tendons; animal food distinguished from vegetable; the body of beasts or birds used in food, distinct from fishes; animal nature; carnality, corporal appetites; near relation; the outward or literal sense. The Orientals termed the immediate or literal signification of any precept or type The Flesh, and the remote or typical meaning The Spirit. This is frequent in St. Paul. Complete Dictionary

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