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Definitions of fool

  1. (informal) having or revealing stupidity; "ridiculous anserine behavior"; "a dopey answer"; "a dopey kid"; "some fool idea about rewriting authors' books" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. indulge in horseplay; "Enough horsing around--let's get back to work!"; "The bored children were fooling about" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. make a fool or dupe of Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. fool or hoax; "The immigrant was duped because he trusted everyone"; "You can't fool me!" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a person who is gullible and easy to take advantage of Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. (informal terms) "gave me a cockamamie reason for not going"; "wore a goofy hat"; "a silly idea"; "some wacky plan for selling more books" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. spend frivolously and unwisely; "Fritter away one's inheritance" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a person who lacks good judgment Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a professional clown employed to entertain a king or nobleman in the middle ages Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. One destitute of reason, or of the common powers of understanding; an idiot; a natural. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. A person deficient in intellect; one who acts absurdly, or pursues a course contrary to the dictates of wisdom; one without judgment; a simpleton; a dolt. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. One who acts contrary to moral and religious wisdom; a wicked person. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. One who counterfeits folly; a professional jester or buffoon; a retainer formerly kept to make sport, dressed fantastically in motley, with ridiculous accouterments. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To play the fool; to trifle; to toy; to spend time in idle sport or mirth. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To infatuate; to make foolish. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To use as a fool; to deceive in a shameful or mortifying manner; to impose upon; to cheat by inspiring foolish confidence; as, to fool one out of his money. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A compound of gooseberries scalded and crushed, with cream; - commonly called gooseberry fool. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A person lacking in reason or intelligence; idiot; in old times, a court jester; one who acts in an unwise manner; a victim or butt. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  19. To make a butt of; treat with contempt; disappoint; deceive. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. One who acts stupidly; a person of weak mind; a jester; (B.) a wicked person. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. To deceive; to treat with contempt. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. To play the fool; to trifle. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  23. Silly or stupid person; jester. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  24. To play the fool. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  25. To make a fool of; impose upon; deceive; play the fool. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. A person lacking sense; a simpleton. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. An idiot; imbecile. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. A court jester. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. A person of weak intellect; a person who acts foolishly; a buffoon; a jester. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. A compound of gooseberries scalded and crushed with cream. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  31. To treat with contempt; to disappoint; to deceive; to infatuate; to cheat. The feast of fools, a kind of festival in the middle ages, somewhat similar to the Saturnalia of the Romans. Abbot of fools, a sort of histrionic character or leading buffoon at the public festivals or mummeries of Christmas or Shrovetide. To play the fool, to act the buffoon; to act like one void of understanding. To put the fool on, to treat as foolish. To make a fool of; to frustrate; to defeat. To fool away, to spend in trifles, idleness, folly, or without advantage; to spend for things of no value or use; to expend improvidently. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  32. To trifle; to toy; to spend time in idleness, sport, or mirth. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  33. One who acts absurdly; a person who is void of reason or understanding; a person of a weak intellect; a jester. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  34. To treat with contempt; to disappoint; to cheat; to trifle; to toy. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  35. A compound of gooseberries scalded and crushed, with cream; -- commonly called gooseberry fool. mso.anu.edu.au
  36. f[=oo]l, n. one who acts stupidly: a person of weak mind: a jester: a tool or victim, as of untoward circumstances: (B.) a wicked person.--v.t. to deceive: to treat with contempt.--v.i. to play the fool: to trifle.--adjs. FOOL'-BEGGED (Shak.), taken for a fool, idiotical, absurd; FOOL'-BORN (Shak.), foolish from one's birth, arising from folly.--n. FOOL'ERY, an act of folly: habitual folly.--adj. FOOL'-HAPP'Y, happy or lucky without contrivance or judgment.--n. FOOL'-HARD'INESS-- (Spens.) FOOL'-HARD'ISE.--adjs. FOOL'-HARD'Y, foolishly bold: rash or incautious; FOOL'ISH, weak in intellect: wanting discretion: ridiculous: marked with folly: deserving ridicule: (B.) sinful, disregarding God's laws.--adv. FOOL'ISHLY.--ns. FOOL'ISHNESS, FOOL'ING, foolery.--adj. FOOL'ISH-WIT'TY (Shak.), wise in folly and foolish in wisdom.--ns. FOOL'S'-ERR'AND, a silly or fruitless enterprise: search for what cannot be found; FOOL'S'-PARS'LEY, an umbelliferous plant in Britain, not to be mistaken for parsley, being poisonous.--FOOL AWAY, to spend to no purpose or profit; FOOL'S CAP, a kind of head-dress worn by professional fools or jesters, usually having a cockscomb hood with bells; FOOL'S PARADISE, a state of happiness based on fictitious hopes or expectations; FOOL WITH, to meddle with officiously; MAKE A FOOL OF, to bring a person into ridicule: to disappoint; PLAY THE FOOL, to behave as a fool: to sport. [O. Fr. fol (Fr. fou), It. folle--L. follis, a wind-bag.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  37. f[=oo]l, n. crushed fruit scalded or stewed, mixed with cream and sugar, as 'gooseberry fool.' [Prob. a use of preceding suggested by trifle.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  38. Silly person, simpleton, person whose conduct one disapproves of, (be a f. to be nothing in comparison with; play the f., blunder, trifle; f.s bolt is soon shot, his stock of argument is soon exhausted; man is f. or physician at thirty, sensible man needs no doctor); jester, clown, in medieval great house (play the f., indulge in buffoonery); dupe (make a f. of; be a f. for one\'s pains, take trouble to no end; All Fools\' day, 1st April; April f., person taken in or sent on f.\'s errand on that day; send, go, on f.\'s errand, fruitless one; f.\'s MATE; f.\'s paradise, illusory happiness); f.\'scap, foolscap, cap with bells worn by medieval jester, dunce\'s conical paper cap, watermark of some 17th-c. paper, long folio writing or printing paper 15-17 x 12-13 1/2 in.; hence foolery (4,5), foolocracy, nn., foolish a., foolishly adv., foolishness n. (Vb) play the f., idle, trifle, (also about&, United States, around); cheat (person) out of money &c. or into doing, get (money &c.) by cajolery out of person; throw (time, money) away foolishly; make a f. of, dupe, play tricks on. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  39. Creamy liquid of fruit stewed, crushed, & mixed with milk, cream, &c. (esp. gooseberry f.). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  40. no f. like an old f. (esp. w. ref. to aged lover). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  41. n. [French] One who is destitute of reason; an idiot; a natural;—a person deficient in intellect; a simpleton; a dunce;—a wicked person;—a professional jester or buffoon. Cabinet Dictionary
  42. n. Viand or beverage made of gooseberries and cream:—also gooseberry fool. Cabinet Dictionary
  43. One to whom nature has denied reason, a natural, an idiot; in Scripture, a wicked man; a term of indignity and reproach; one who counterfeits folly, a buffoon, a jefter. Complete Dictionary

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