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Definitions of gender

  1. a grammatical category in inflected languages governing the agreement between nouns and pronouns and adjectives; in some languages it is quite arbitrary but in Indo-European languages it is usually based on sex or animateness Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the properties that distinguish organisms on the basis of their reproductive roles; "she didn't want to know the sex of the foetus" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. Kind; sort. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  4. Sex, male or female. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. A classification of nouns, primarily according to sex; and secondarily according to some fancied or imputed quality associated with sex. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To beget; to engender. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  7. To copulate; to breed. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  8. The totality of characteristics of structures and functions differentiating the male from the female organism. SEX includes sexology, the study of the differences and interactions between the sexes. It does not include various sexual factors in epidemiology and statistics or the role of the sexes or differences in behavior, psychology, and sociology. Medical Dictionary DB
  9. The grammatical distinction of sex, expressed by a suffix, a prenx, or by a different word. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. (B.) To copulate. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  11. Kind, esp. with regard to sex: (gram.) the distinction of nouns acc. to sex. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  12. Sex. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  13. To beget; originate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. A property of certain words whereby they indicate sex. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. Kind, as respects sex; class or distinction among words as representing sex. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  16. The difference in words expressing the distinction between male and female; sex. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  17. Defined difference between men and women based on culturally and socially constructed mores, politics, and affairs. Time and location give rise to a variety of local definitions. Contrasts to what is defined as the biological sex of a living creature. thelawdictionary.org
  18. That which designates the sexes. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  19. As a general rule, when the masculine is used it includes the feminine, as, man (q. v.) sometimes includes women. This is the general rule, unless a contrary intention appears. But in penal statutes, which must be construed strictly, when the masculine is used and not the feminine, the latter is not in general included. 3 C. & P. 225. An instance to the contrary, however, may be found in the construction, 25 Ed. III, st. 5, c. 2, §1, which declares it to be high treason, "When a man doth compass or imagine the death of our lord the king," &c. These words, "our lord the king," have been construed to include a queen regnant. 2 Inst. 7, 8, 9; H. P. C. 12; 1 Hawk. P. C. c. 17; Bac. Ab. Treason, D. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  20. Pothier says that the masculine often includes the feminine, but the feminine never includes the masculine; that according to this rule if a man were to bequeath to another all his horses, his mares would pass by the legacy; but if he were to give all his mares, the horses would not be included. Poth. Introd. au titre 16, des Testaments et Donations Testamentaires, n. 170; 3 Brev. R. 9. In the Louisiana code in the French language, it is provided that the word fils, sons, comprehends filles, daughters. Art. 3522, n. 1. Vide Ayl. Pand. 57; 4 Car. & Payne, 216; S. C. 19 Engl. Com. Law R. 351; Barr. on the Stat. 216, note; Feme; Feme covert; Feminine; Male; Man; Sex; Women; Worthiest of blood. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  21. jen'd[.e]r, v.t. to beget.--v.i. (B.) to copulate. [An abbrev. of engender.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  22. jen'd[.e]r, n. kind, esp. with regard to sex: (gram.) the distinction of nouns according to sex. [Fr. genre--L. genus, generis, a kind, kin.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  23. Grammatical classification (or one of the two, or three, classes) of objects roughly corresponding to the two sexes& sexlessness (MASCULINE, FEMININE, & NEUTER; see also COMMON, EPICENE), (of nouns& pronouns) property of belonging to such class, (of adjj.) appropriate form for accompanying a noun of any such class; (joc.) sex. Hence genderless a. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  24. (poet.). =ENGENDER. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  25. n. [French, Latin] Sex, male or female;—in grammar, a difference in words to express distinction of sex;—kind; sort. Cabinet Dictionary
  26. A kind, a sort, a sex; a distinction of nouns in grammar. Complete Dictionary

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