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Definitions of grind

  1. reduce to small pieces or particles by pounding or abrading; "grind the spices in a mortar"; "mash the garlic" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. press or grind with a crunching noise Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. work hard; "She was digging away at her math homework"; "Lexicographers drudge all day long" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. hard monotonous routine work Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. make a grating or grinding sound by rubbing together; "grate one's teeth in anger" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. the act of grinding to a powder or dust Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a student who studies excessively Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. an insignificant student who is ridiculed as being affected or studying excessively Wordnet Dictionary DB
  9. dance by rotating the pelvis in an erotically suggestive way, often while in contact with one's partner such that the dancers' legs are interlaced Wordnet Dictionary DB
  10. To reduce to powder by friction, as in a mill, or with the teeth; to crush into small fragments; to produce as by the action of millstones. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To wear down, polish, or sharpen, by friction; to make smooth, sharp, or pointed; to whet, as a knife or drill; to rub against one another, as teeth, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To oppress by severe exactions; to harass. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To study hard for examination. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To perform the operation of grinding something; to turn the millstones. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To become ground or pulverized by friction; as, this corn grinds well. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To become polished or sharpened by friction; as, glass grinds smooth; steel grinds to a sharp edge. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To move with much difficulty or friction; to grate. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To perform hard aud distasteful service; to drudge; to study hard, as for an examination. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. The act of reducing to powder, or of sharpening, by friction. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. Any severe continuous work or occupation; esp., hard and uninteresting study. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. A hard student; a dig. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Ground. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. Grinding. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  24. To make into powder by friction; sharpen or smooth by friction; as, to grind a knife; grate or rub together; oppress; harass; turn the crank of, as a hand-organ, etc. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  25. To sharpen or polish something, or to make something into powder, by friction; be grated or rubbed together; college slang, to study hard. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  26. The act of sharpening, polishing, etc.; laborious and tedious work; wearisome routine; as, the daily grind; college slang, a student who studies laboriously. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. To reduce to powder by friction: to wear down or sharpen by rubbing: to rub together: to oppress or harass. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  28. To be moved or rubbed together:-pr.p. grinding; pa.t. and pa.p. ground. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  29. To rub to powder; wear down by rubbing; oppress. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  30. To wear down or pulverize by friction; sharpen; chafe; oppress; harass. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. To be chafed, polished, or sharpened by rubbing. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  32. To toil mechanically. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. Study for an examination, considered as irksome. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  34. To reduce to small pieces or powder by friction; to wear down, sharpen, or smooth by friction; to grate; to oppress; to harass; to teach or study in preparation for an examination. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  35. To be rubbed together; to perform the operation of grinding; to be pulverized, polished, or sharpened by grinding; to study for an examination. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  36. To break and reduce to powder by friction or rubbing, as between stones; to sharpen or polish; to oppress by severe exactions; in familiar language, to prepare a student for examination, and to prepare one's self; to perform the operation of grinding. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  37. ( Exodus 32:20 ; Deuteronomy 9:21 ; Judges 16:21 ), to crush small (Heb. tahan); to oppress the poor ( Isaiah 3:5 ). The hand-mill was early used by the Hebrews ( Numbers 11:8 ). It consisted of two stones, the upper ( Deuteronomy 24:6 ; 2 Sam 11:21 ) being movable and slightly concave, the lower being stationary. The grinders mentioned Eccl 12:3 are the teeth. (See MILL .) biblestudytools.com
  38. gr[=i]nd, v.t. to reduce to powder by friction: to wear down or sharpen by rubbing: to rub together: to oppress or harass: to set in motion by a crank.--v.i. to be moved or rubbed together: to drudge at any tedious task: to read hard:--pr.p. gr[=i]nd'ing; pa.t. and pa.p. ground.--n. hard or distasteful work: laborious study for a special examination, &c.--ns. GRIND'ER, he who, or that which, grinds: a double or jaw tooth that grinds food: a coach or crammer of students for examination: a hard student; GRIND'ERY, a place where knives, &c., are ground, or where they are sold: shoemakers' materials; GRIND'ING, act or process of reducing to powder.--p.adj. harassing.--n. GRIND'STONE, a circular revolving stone for grinding or sharpening tools.--KEEP ONE'S NOSE TO THE GRINDSTONE, to subject one to severe continuous toil or punishment.--TAKE A GRINDER (Dickens), to put the left thumb to the nose, and to work a visionary coffee-mill round it with the right--a gesture of contempt. [A.S. grindan.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  39. (ground, pr. -ow-), & n. Reduce to small particles or powder by crushing between mill-stones, teeth, &c. (often down, small, to pieces, into dust, &c.); (quasi-pass.) admit of being ground (will not g. fine); oppress, harass with exactions, (often down; a grinding tyranny; also g. the faces of the poor &c.); produce (flour) by grinding; sharpen or smooth by friction (has an AXE to g.; g. lenses, diamonds, &c.); work (hand-mill); turn handle of (hurdy-gurdy; also abs.); produce, bring out, (music) from hurdy-gurdy; toil monotonously, study hard; teach (subject, pupil in it) laboriously; rub (t. & i.) gratingly on, into, or against (ground his heel into it; ship was grinding on rocks), rub (teeth) hard together (g. out an oath, utter while grinding teeth); grindstone, thick revolving stone disk for grinding, sharpening, & polishing (hold, keep, one\'s nose to the grindstone, make him work incessantly), kind of stone used for these. (N.) grinding; hard monotonous work or task; walk for exercise. [English] Concise Oxford Dictionary

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