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Definitions of hook

  1. make off with belongings of others Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. approach with an offer of sexual favors; "he was solicited by a prostitute"; "The young man was caught soliciting in the park" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. anything that serves as an enticement Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a mechanical device that is curved or bent to suspend or hold or pull something Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. take by theft; "Someone snitched my wallet!" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a sharp curve or crook; a shape resembling a hook Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a golf shot that curves to the left for a right-handed golfer; "he tooks lessons to cure his hooking" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. rip off; ask an unreasonable price Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a basketball shot made over the head with the hand that is farther from the basket Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a short swinging punch delivered from the side with the elbow bent Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a curved or bent implement for suspending or pulling something Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. a catch for locking a door Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. entice and trap; "The car salesman had snared three potential customers" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. fasten with a hook Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. hit with a hook; in boxing; "His opponent hooked him badly" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. secure with the foot; "hook the ball" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. to cause (someone or oneself) to become dependent (on something, especially a narcotic drug) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. catch with a hook; "hook a fish" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19. hit with a hook; "His opponent hooked him badly" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  20. hit a ball and put a spin on it so that it travels to the left Wordnet Dictionary DB
  21. make a piece of needlework by interlocking and looping thread with a hooked needle; "She sat there crocheting all day" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  22. A piece of metal, or other hard material, formed or bent into a curve or at an angle, for catching, holding, or sustaining anything; as, a hook for catching fish; a hook for fastening a gate; a boat hook, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. That part of a hinge which is fixed to a post, and on which a door or gate hangs and turns. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. An implement for cutting grass or grain; a sickle; an instrument for cutting or lopping; a billhook. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. See Eccentric, and V-hook. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. A snare; a trap. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. A field sown two years in succession. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. To catch or fasten with a hook or hooks; to seize, capture, or hold, as with a hook, esp. with a disguised or baited hook; hence, to secure by allurement or artifice; to entrap; to catch; as, to hook a dress; to hook a trout. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. To seize or pierce with the points of the horns, as cattle in attacking enemies; to gore. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. To steal. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. To bend; to curve as a hook. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. A spit or narrow cape of sand or gravel turned landward at the outer end; as, Sandy Hook. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. To move or go with a sudden turn; Webster Dictionary DB
  34. The projecting points of the thigh bones of cattle; - called also hook bones. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. to make off; to clear out; - often with it. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. A curved piece of metal, bone, etc., to hold or catch something, as a fish-hook; a trap; an instrument for lopping or cutting, as a sickle; a cape or headland. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  37. To catch with, or as with, a hook; to gore or attack with the horns; said of a horned animal. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  38. To bend in the shape of a hook; become fastened to anything with a hook; with on; in golf, to drive widely to the left. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  39. An instrument curved or bent near its tip, used for fixation of a part or traction. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  40. Instrument with pointed terminal curve. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  41. A piece of metal bent into a curve, so as to catch or hold anything: a snare: an instrument for cutting grain. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  42. To catch or hold with a hook: to draw as with a hook: to insnare. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  43. To bend: to be curved. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  44. Anything bent or curved that takes hold. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  45. To catch or hold with a hook. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  46. To fasten with a hook; entrap. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  47. To attack with the horns, as a cow. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  48. Something bent so as to hold another object, as a fish hook. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  49. A piece of metal bent into a curve for catching and holding anything; a square; a curved instrument for cutting grain; a sickle; that part of a hinge which is fixed or inserted in a post; a forked timber in a ship, placed on the keel. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  50. To catch with a hook; to draw, as with a hook; to ensnare. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  51. To bend; to be curving. By hook or by crook. See Crook. Off the hooks out of sorts; dead. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  52. A piece of metal or other substance bent or curved so as to catch, hold, or sustain; a curved cutting instrument; a sickle; a snare; a trap. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  53. To catch, draw, or fasten, as with a hook; to draw by force or artifice; to bend. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  54. The projecting points of the thigh bones of cattle; -- called also hook bones. mso.anu.edu.au
  55. Heb. hah, a "ring" inserted in the nostrils of animals to which a cord was fastened for the purpose of restraining them ( 2 Kings 19:28 ; Isaiah 37:28 Isaiah 37:29 ; Ezekiel 29:4 ; 38:4 ). "The Orientals make use of this contrivance for curbing their work-beasts...When a beast becomes unruly they have only to draw the cord on one side, which, by stopping his breath, punishes him so effectually that after a few repetitions he fails not to become quite tractable whenever he begins to feel it" (Michaelis). So God's agents are never beyond his control. biblestudytools.com
  56. Hakkah, a fish "hook" ( Job 41:2 , Heb. Text, 40:25 ; Isaiah 19:8 ; Habakkuk 1:15 ). biblestudytools.com
  57. Vav, a "peg" on which the curtains of the tabernacle were hung ( Exodus 26:32 ). biblestudytools.com
  58. Tsinnah, a fish-hooks ( Amos 4:2 ). biblestudytools.com
  59. Mazleg, flesh-hooks ( 1 Samuel 2:13 1 Samuel 2:14 ), a kind of fork with three teeth for turning the sacrifices on the fire, etc. biblestudytools.com
  60. Mazmeroth, pruning-hooks ( Isaiah 2:4 ; Joel 3:10 ). biblestudytools.com
  61. 'Agmon ( Job 41:2 , Heb. Text 40:26 ), incorrectly rendered in the Authorized Version. Properly a rush-rope for binding animals, as in Revised Version margin. These dictionary topics are fromM.G. Easton M.A., D.D., Illustrated Bible Dictionary, Third Edition,published by Thomas Nelson, 1897. Public Domain, copy freely.Bibliography InformationEaston, Matthew George. "Entry for Hook". "Easton's Bible Dictionary". . biblestudytools.com
  62. An offer or jingle that gets the attention of the audience. It makes them listen to the proposed value. thelawdictionary.org
  63. hook, n. a piece of metal bent into a curve, so as to catch or hold anything: a snare: an advantageous hold: a curved instrument for cutting grain: a spit of land projecting into the sea, ending in a hook-shaped form.--v.t. to catch or hold with a hook: to draw as with a hook: to ensnare: (golf) to drive a ball widely to the left--also Draw.--v.i. to bend: to be curved.--adj. HOOKED.--ns. HOOK'EDNESS, the state of being bent like a hook; HOOK'ER, he who, or that which, hooks.--adj. HOOK'-NOSED, having a hooked or curved nose.--n. HOOK'-PIN, an iron pin with hooked head used for pinning the frame of a floor or roof together.--adj. HOOK'Y, full of, or pertaining to, hooks.--HOOK AND EYE, a contrivance for fastening dresses by means of a hook made to fasten on a ring or eye on another part of the dress; HOOK IT (slang), to decamp, make off.--BY HOOK OR BY CROOK, one way or the other; OFF THE HOOKS, out of gear: superseded: dead; ON ONE'S OWN HOOK, on one's own responsibility. [A.S. hóc; Dut. haak, Ger. haken.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  64. An instrument, consisting of a steel wire, flattened at the middle, and having the extremities crooked and pointed. Some hooks are furnished with a handle at one extremity-the other having one or two hooks ;-constituting the tingle or double hook. The hook is used by anatomists and surgeons to lay hold of, and raise up, certain parts, the dissection of which is delicate, or which would slip from the fingers. The Tenaculum is a variety of the hook. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  65. Piece of metal or other material bent back or having sharp angle, for catching hold or for hanging things upon; (also fish-h.) bent piece of wire, usu. barbed, for catching fish; (fig.) trap, snare; curved cutting instrument, esp. reaping-h.; h. & eye, small metal h. & loop as dress-fastening; sharp bend, e.g. in river; projecting point of land, esp. H. of Holland; =POT-h.; by h. or by crook, by fair means or foul; drop off the hh., (slang) die; (slang) on one\'s own h. (account); h.-nose (d), (having) aquiline nose. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  66. Grasp with hook: secure with hook (s); h. on, in, up, &c., attach with hook; (intr.) join on, fit on; steal; catch (fish) with hook (also fig.); (Golf) drive (ball) widely to left; (Cricket) play (ball) round from off to on side without hitting it at the pitch. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  67. (slang), make off, run away. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  68. Curved instrument for traction or holding. American pocket medical dictionary.
  69. A length of metal bent back or fashioned with a sharp angle for catching hold of something. See Tenaculum, and Volsella. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  70. n. [Anglo-Saxon] Some hard material bent into a curve for catching, holding, and sustaining any thing. [Welsh] A scythe or sickle. Cabinet Dictionary
  71. Any thing bent to as to catch hold; the bended wire on which the bait is hung for fishes, and with which the fish is pierced; a snare, a trap; a fickle to reap corn; an iron to seize the meat in the caldron; an instrument to cut or lop with; the part of the hinge fixed to the post; Hook or crook, one way or other, by any expedient. Complete Dictionary

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