Spellcheck.net

Definitions of jump

  1. go back and forth; swing back and forth between two states or conditions Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. rise in rank or status; "Her new novel jumped high on the bestseller list" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. run off or leave the rails; "the train derailed because a cow was standing on the tracks" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. be highly noticeable Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. the act of jumping; propelling yourself off the ground; "he advanced in a series of jumps"; "the jumping was unexpected" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. descent with a parachute; "he had done a lot of parachuting in the army" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a sudden involuntary movement; "he awoke with a start" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. (film) an abrupt transition from one scene to another Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. an abrupt transition; "a successful leap from college to the major leagues" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a sudden and decisive increase; "a jump in attendance" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. pass abruptly from one state or topic to another; "leap into fame"; "jump to a conclusion" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. bypass; "He skipped a row in the text and so the sentence was incomprehensible" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. make a sudden physical attack on; "The muggers jumped the woman in the fur coat" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. start a car engine whose battery by connecting it to another car's battery Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. move forward by leaps and bounds; "The horse bounded across the meadow"; "The child leapt across the puddle"; "Can you jump over the fence?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. move or jump suddenly, as if in surprise or alarm; "She startled when I walked into the room" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. increase suddenly and significantly; "Prices jumped overnight" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. enter eagerly into; "He jumped into the game" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19. cause to jump or leap; "the trainer jumped the tiger through the hoop" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  20. jump from an airplane and descend with a parachute Wordnet Dictionary DB
  21. A kind of loose jacket for men. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. A bodice worn instead of stays by women in the 18th century. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To spring free from the ground by the muscular action of the feet and legs; to project one's self through the air; to spring; to bound; to leap. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To move as if by jumping; to bounce; to jolt. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To pass by a spring or leap; to overleap; as, to jump a stream. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To cause to jump; as, he jumped his horse across the ditch. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. To expose to danger; to risk; to hazard. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. To join by a butt weld. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. To thicken or enlarge by endwise blows; to upset. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. To bore with a jumper. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. The act of jumping; a leap; a spring; a bound. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. An effort; an attempt; a venture. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. The space traversed by a leap. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. A dislocation in a stratum; a fault. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. An abrupt interruption of level in a piece of brickwork or masonry. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. Nice; exact; matched; fitting; precise. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. Exactly; pat. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. Exactly. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. To coincide; to agree; to accord; to tally; - followed by with. Webster Dictionary DB
  40. A spring or bound; the space jumped. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  41. To cause to spring or bound; leap over; to take possession of (a mining claim) during the absence of the owner. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  42. To spring upward or forward. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  43. To spring upward, or forward, or both: to bound: to pass to as by a leap. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  44. To pass by a leap: to skip over:-pr.p. jumping; pa.p. jumped. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  45. Act of jumping: a bound. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  46. To leap over. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  47. A spring; leap. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  48. To spring; leap. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  49. To cause to leap. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  50. To impel oneself through the air; leap; spring. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  51. The act of jumping; a leap; spring. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  52. The act of jumping; a leap; a bound; a lucky chance; a fault. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  53. A kind of jacket; a kind of loose or limber stays or waistcoat, worn by females. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  54. To pass by a leap; to skip over. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  55. To leap; to spring; to pass to at a leap; to agree with. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  56. A leap; a spring; a bound. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  57. To spring upwards or forwards, generally both; to pass to or over by a leap. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  58. To coincide; to agree; to accord; to tally; -- followed by with. mso.anu.edu.au
  59. jump, v.i. to spring upward, or forward, or both: to bound: to pass to as by a leap: to agree, coincide (with).--v.t. to pass by a leap: to skip over: to cause to start, as game:--pr.p. jump'ing; pa.p. jumped.--n. act of jumping: a bound, a hazard.--adv. (Shak.) exactly.--ns. JUMP'ER, one who jumps: a long iron drill or borer used in quarries and mines: (pl.) a term applied to certain Welsh Methodists (c. 1760), who jumped about in worship: JUMP'ING-DEER, the black-tailed American deer; JUMP'ING-HARE, a South African rodent, akin to the jerboas; JUMP'-SEAT, a carriage-seat which may be moved backwards or forwards, so as to be used as single or double: a carriage with a movable seat; COUNT'ER-JUMP'ER, a draper's shopman.--JUMP A CLAIM (U.S.), to take land to which another already holds a claim; JUMP AT, to embrace with eagerness; JUMP ONE'S BAIL, to abscond, forfeiting one's bail; JUMP OVER, to disregard, omit; JUMP OVER THE BROOMSTICK, to make an irregular marriage. [From a Teut. root seen in Sw. dial. gumpa, Middle High Ger. gumpen, to jump.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  60. jump, JUMPER, jump'er, n. a loose garment: overall. [More prob. a thing to be jumped or slipped on, than from Fr. jupe, a petticoat, skirt.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  61. Leap, bound, spring from ground; long, high, j., athletic competitions; start caused by shock or excitement, esp. (slang) the jj., delirium tremens; abrupt rise in amount, price, value, &c.; sudden transition, gap in series, argument, &c. Hence jumpiness n., jumpy a. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  62. Spring from ground &c. by flexion& sudden muscular extension of legs or (of fish) tail; move suddenly with leap or bound (up from seat &c., out, &c.); start with sudden jerk from excitement, shock, &c., esp. j. for joy; rise suddenly in price &c.; come to, arrive at, (conclusion) hastily; j. at, (fig.) accept (offer, bargain) eagerly; j. (up)on, attack (offender &c.) crushingly with word or act; agree, coincide, (together, one with another); pass over (gate &c.) by leap; (of railway carriage) leave (line); help (child &c.) to j. down &c.; cause (thing) to j.; startle (person, nerves); cook (potatoes &c.) in frying-pan, occasionally shaking them (usu. in p.p.); pounce upon (thing); steal a march upon; (Colon.) take summary possession of (claim abandoned or forfeited by former occupant); skip over (subject, part of book, &c.). Hence jumpable a. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  63. j. down person\'s throat, answer, interrupt, in violent manner; j. out of one\'s skin, j. with surprise or shock. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  64. n. Act of jumping ; a leap : a spring ; a bound ; - the space or distance leaped over ; - a dislocation in a mineral stratum ; a fault. Cabinet Dictionary
  65. The act of jumping, a leap, a skip, a lucky chance; a waistcoat, limber stays worn by ladies. Complete Dictionary

What are the misspellings for jump?

X