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Definitions of laugh

  1. produce laughter Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a facial expression characteristic of a person laughing; "his face wrinkled in a silent laugh of derision" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the sound of laughing Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a humorous anecdote or remark intended to provoke laughter; "he told a very funny joke"; "he knows a million gags"; "thanks for the laugh"; "he laughed unpleasantly at hisown jest"; "even a schoolboy's jape is supposed to have some ascertainable point" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  5. To show mirth, satisfaction, or derision, by peculiar movement of the muscles of the face, particularly of the mouth, causing a lighting up of the face and eyes, and usually accompanied by the emission of explosive or chuckling sounds from the chest and throat; to indulge in laughter. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. Fig.: To be or appear gay, cheerful, pleasant, mirthful, lively, or brilliant; to sparkle; to sport. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To affect or influence by means of laughter or ridicule. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. An expression of mirth peculiar to the human species; the sound heard in laughing; laughter. See Laugh, v. i. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To express by, or utter with, laughter; - with out. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A convulsive sound caused by merriment; an expression, made only by man, of mirth, ridicule, etc. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. To express merriment, etc.; by such a sound; appear gay, pleasant, etc., jeer; with at. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  12. To express with laughter. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  13. Laugher. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  14. To make the noise showing or caused by mirth: to be gay or lively. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  15. The sound caused by merriment. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  16. Sound indicative of mirth or derision. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  17. To deride with laughter. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  18. To utter a laugh. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  19. To ridicule; deride. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  20. To give vent to laughter; be glad. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  21. To scoff; jeer; followed by at. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. An act of laughter; merriment; ridicule. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. An expression of sudden mirth peculiar to the human species. To laugh at, to ridicule. To laugh to scorn, to deride; to treat with mockery. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  24. To ridicule or deride. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  25. To make the noise and exhibit the features which sudden mirth creates; to be gay, cheerful, or lively. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  26. The expression of sudden mirth peculiar to man. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  27. To exhibit the appearance of the features, and utter the sounds, caused by mirth; to ridicule or deride. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  28. To express by, or utter with, laughter; -- with out. mso.anu.edu.au
  29. To express by, or utter with, laughter; with out. dictgcide_fs
  30. läf, v.i. to express mirth or joy by an explosive inarticulate sound of the voice and peculiar facial distortion: to be gay or lively: make merry (with at), to flout.--v.t. to express with a laugh: to affect in some way by laughter.--n. the sound caused by merriment.--adj. LAUGH'ABLE, ludicrous.--n. LAUGH'ABLENESS.--adv. LAUGH'ABLY.--ns. LAUGH'ER; LAUGH'ING-GAS, a gas which excites laughter, called nitrous oxide, used as an anæsthetic in minor surgical operations, as in dentistry; LAUGH'ING-JACK'ASS, the great kingfisher of Australia.--adv. LAUGH'INGLY, in a laughing manner.--ns. LAUGH'ING-STOCK, an object of ridicule, like something stuck up to be laughed at; LAUGH'TER, act or noise of laughing.--LAUGH A THING OFF, to treat as if worthy only of a laugh; LAUGH IN ONE'S SLEEVE, to laugh inwardly; LAUGH ONE OUT OF, to make a person abandon a habit, &c., by laughing at him for it; LAUGH ON THE WRONG SIDE OF THE MOUTH, to be made feel disappointment or sorrow, esp. after boasting, &c.; LAUGH TO SCORN, to deride or jeer at.--HAVE THE LAUGH ON ONE'S SIDE, to be able to laugh at another through getting the better of him by superior dexterity, &c. [A.S. hlihan; Ger. lachen, Goth. hlahjan; prob. imit.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  31. Risus- l. Sardonic, Canine laugh. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  32. A series of spasmodic expirations, accompanied with characteristic sounds produced by the vibration of the widely separated vocal cords. na
  33. Make the sounds& movements of face& sides by which lively amusement, sense of the ludicrous, exultation, & scorn, are instinctively expressed, have these emotions, (l. in one\'s sleeve, be secretly amused; laughing hyena, jackass; l. on wrong side of mouth, have revulsion from joy or amusement to tears or vexation; he laughs best who laughs last, warning against premature exultation); (of water, landscape, corn, &c.) be lively with play of movement or light; utter laughingly; hold up to scorn; l. at, make fun of, ridicule, also look pleasantly or smile at; get (person) out of habit, belief, &c., by ridicule (l. person, opinion, &c., out of court, deprive of a hearing by ridicule); l. away, dismiss (subject) with a l., while away (time) with jests; l. down, silence with laughter; l. off (embarrassment &c.), get rid of with a jest; l. over, discuss with laughter; hence laugher n., laughing a., laughingly adv. (N.) sound made in, act of, laughing (join in the l., esp. of person taking banter good-humouredly; have, get, the l. of, turn the tables on assailant, also have the l. on one\'s side); person\'s manner of laughing. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  34. The characteristic sound produced in laughing. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  35. n. [Anglo-Saxon] To give expression to pleasure, mirth, or sense of the ludicrous by a twinkling of the eyes, contortion of the features, convulsive catching of the breath, and heaving or shaking of the sides;— to smile or grin;— to chuckle; to titter;— to he merry or gay;— to seem favourable, pleasant, or fertile;— to shout for joy;— v.t. To ridicule or deride;— to scorn;— imp. & pp. laughed; ppr. laughing. Cabinet Dictionary
  36. n. An expression of mirth peculiar to the human species; laughter. Cabinet Dictionary

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