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Definitions of predicate

  1. involve as a necessary condition of consequence; as in logic; "solving the problem is predicated on understanding it well" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. one of the two main constituents of a sentence; the predicate contains the verb and its complements Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. (logic) what is predicated of the subject of a proposition; the second term in a proposition is predicated of the first term by means of the copula; "`Socrates is a man' predicates manhood of Socrates" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. (grammar) of adjectives; relating to or occurring within the predicate of a sentence; "`red' is a predicative adjective in `the apple is red'" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. affirm or declare as an attribute or quality of; "The speech predicated the fitness of the candidate to be President" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. make the (grammatical) predicate in a proposition; "The predicate `dog' is predicated of the subject `Fido' in the sentence `Fido is a dog'" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. To assert to belong to something; to affirm (one thing of another); as, to predicate whiteness of snow. Newage Dictionary DB
  8. To found; to base. Newage Dictionary DB
  9. To affirm something of another thing; to make an affirmation. Newage Dictionary DB
  10. That which is affirmed or denied of the subject. In these propositions, "Paper is white," "Ink is not white," whiteness is the predicate affirmed of paper and denied of ink. Newage Dictionary DB
  11. The word or words in a proposition which express what is affirmed of the subject. Newage Dictionary DB
  12. Predicated. Newage Dictionary DB
  13. To affirm as belonging to, or characteristic of, something; assert; declare. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  14. To affirm one thing of another; assert. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. In grammar, expressing that which is stated about the subject. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. In grammar, the part of a sentence which makes a statement about the subject. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. To affirm one thing of another. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  18. (logic and gram.) That which is stated of the subject. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  19. Predication. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  20. That which is stated of any subject. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  21. To state as belonging to something. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. The word or words in a sentence that express what is affirmed or denied of a subject. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. Predicable. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. That which is affirmed or denied. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  25. To comprise an affirmation. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  26. To affirm one thing of another; to affirm. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  27. That which is affirmed or denied of the subject. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  28. In logic. That which is said concerning the subject in a logical prop- osition ; as, "The law is the perfection of common sense." "Perfection of common sense," being affirmed concerning the law, (the subject,) is the predicate or thing predicated. Wharton ; Bourland v. Hildreth, 26 Cal. 232. thelawdictionary.org
  29. pred'i-k[=a]t, v.t. to affirm one thing of another: to assert: to base on certain grounds.--n. (logic and gram.) that which is stated of the subject.--n. PREDIC[=A]'TION, act of predicating: assertion: affirmation.--adj. PREDIC[=A]'TIVE, expressing predication or affirmation: affirming: asserting.--adv. PRED'IC[=A]TIVELY.--adj. PRED'IC[=A]TORY, affirmative. [L. prædic[=a]re, -[=a]tum, to proclaim.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  30. (Logic) what is predicated, what is affirmed or denied of the subject by means of the copula (e.g. a fool in he is a fool); (Gram.) what is said of the subject, including the copula (e.g. is a fool in prec. ex.); quality, attribute. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  31. Assert, affirm, as true or existent, as many truths may be predicated about humanity, we p. goodness or badness of a motive, p. of a motive that it is good or bad; (Logic) assert (thing) about subject. Hence or cogn. predication n., predicative a., predicatively adv. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  32. (Log.) In a proposition, the term which is affirmed or denied of the subject. See Predicable. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  33. n. The thing or quality affirmed of the subject ;-in grammar, the word or words in a proposition expressing that which is affirmed of the subject. Cabinet Dictionary

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