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Definitions of rent

  1. shattered or torn up or torn apart violently as by e.g. wind or lightning or explosive; "an old blasted apple tree"; "a tree rent by lightning"; "cities torn by bombs"; "earthquake-torn streets" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. hold under a lease or rental agreement; of goods and services Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. engage for service under a term of contract; "We took an apartment on a quiet street"; "Let's rent a car"; "Shall we take a guide in Rome?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. the return derived from cultivated land in excess of that derived from the poorest land cultivated under similar conditions Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. grant use or occupation of under a term of contract; "I am leasing my country estate to some foreigners" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. let for money; of housing Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. the act of rending or ripping or splitting something; "he gave the envelope a vigorous rip" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. an opening made forcibly as by pulling apart; "there was a rip in his pants" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a regular payment by a tenant to a landlord for use of some property Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. an opening made forcibly as by pulling apart; "there was a rip in his pants"; "she had snags in her stockings" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  11. let for money; "We rented our apartment to friends while we were abroad" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. That portion of the produce of the earth paid to the landlord for the use of the "original and indestructible powers of the soil;" the excess of the return from a given piece of cultivated land over that from land of equal area at the "margin of cultivation." Called also economic, / Ricardian, rent. Economic rent is due partly to differences of productivity, but chiefly to advantages of location; it is equivalent to ordinary or commercial rent less interest on improvements, and nearly equivalent to ground rent. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Loosely, a return or profit from a differential advantage for production, as in case of income or earnings due to rare natural gifts creating a natural monopoly. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To rant. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. imp. & p. p. of Rend. Newage Dictionary DB
  16. An opening made by rending; a break or breach made by force; a tear. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Figuratively, a schism; a rupture of harmony; a separation; as, a rent in the church. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To tear. See Rend. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Income; revenue. See Catel. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. Pay; reward; share; toll. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. A certain periodical profit, whether in money, provisions, chattels, or labor, issuing out of lands and tenements in payment for the use; commonly, a certain pecuniary sum agreed upon between a tenant and his landlord, paid at fixed intervals by the lessee to the lessor, for the use of land or its appendages; as, rent for a farm, a house, a park, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To grant the possession and enjoyment of, for a rent; to lease; as, the owwner of an estate or house rents it. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To take and hold under an agreement to pay rent; as, the tennant rents an estate of the owner. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To be leased, or let for rent; as, an estate rents for five hundred dollars a year. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. imp. & p. p. of Rend. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. Of rend. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  27. A tear; a hole or slit made by rending or tearing, especially in cloth; payment at stated times for the use of property. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. To hold in possession by paying for at stated times; hire; as, to rent a house from an owner; to give possession of, in return for regular stated payments; lease; as, to rent a house to a tenant. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  29. Be leased or let; as, the house rents for $1, 000. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  30. An opening made by rending: fissure: break: tear. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  31. Annual payment in return for the use of property held of another, esp. houses and lands. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  32. To hold or occupy by paying rent: to let for a rent. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  33. To be let for rent. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  34. Pa.t. and pa.p. of REND. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  35. A fissure; tear; payment for the use of lands, houses, &c. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  36. To let or occupy for rent. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  37. To obtain or let out for rent; hire. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. To be rented or leased. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. Imp. & pp. or REND, v. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. A hole or slit made by rending. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. The payment periodically made for the use of property. rental. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  42. An opening produced by rending or violent separation; a schism; a separation. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  43. A sum of money issuing yearly from lands or tenements. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  44. To lease or hold in tenancy lands or tenements for a certain consideration. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  45. To be leased or let for rent. See Render. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  46. That portion of the produce of the earth paid to the landlord for the use of the original and indestructible powers of the soil; the excess of the return from a given piece of cultivated land over that from land of equal area at the margin of cultivation. Webster Dictionary DB
  47. Did rend. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  48. A tear; an opening caused by a forcible division. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  49. Of rend, which see. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  50. Yearly income; annual payment; the yearly sum paid by an occupier or lessee to a proprietor. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  51. To hold or occupy by the payment of a yearly sum; to lease or let for an annual payment. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  52. ( Isaiah 3:24 ), probably a rope, as rendered in the LXX. and Vulgate and Revised Version, or as some prefer interpreting the phrase, "girdle and robe are torn [i.e., are 'a rent'] by the hand of violence." biblestudytools.com
  53. That portion of the produce of the earth paid to the landlord for the use of the economic rent, or Ricardian rent. Economic rent is due partly to differences of productivity, but chiefly to advantages of location; it is equivalent to ordinary or commercial rent less interest on improvements, and nearly equivalent to ground rent. dictgcide_fs
  54. rent, n. an opening made by rending: fissure: break: tear: a schism, as a rent in a church. [Rend.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  55. rent, n. annual payment in return for the use of property held of another, esp. houses and lands: revenue.--v.t. to hold or occupy by paying rent: to let, or to hire, for a rent.--v.i. to be let for rent: to endow.--adj. RENT'ABLE.--ns. RENT'AL, a schedule or account of rents, with the tenants' names, &c.: a rent-roll: rent; RENT'ALLER; RENT'-CHARGE, a rent on a conveyance of land in fee simple; RENT'-DAY, the day on which rents are paid; RENTE (Fr.), annual income; RENT'ER, one who holds by paying rent for; RENT'ER-WARD'EN, the warden of a company who receives rents.--adj. RENT'-FREE, without payment of rent.--ns. RENT'-GATH'ERER, a collector of rents; RENT'-ROLL, a roll or account of rents: a rental or schedule of rents. [Fr. rente--L. reddita (pecunia), money paid--redd[)e]re, to pay.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  56. rent, pa.t. and pa.p. of rend. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  57. See rend Concise Oxford Dictionary
  58. Tear in garment &c., opening in clouds &c. resembling tear; cleft, fissure, gorge. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  59. Tenant\'s periodical payment to owner or landlord for use of land or house or room; payment for hire of machinery &c.; r.-charge, periodical charge on land &c. reserved by deed to one who is not the owner; r.-free a. & adv., with exemption from r.; r.-roll, register of person\'s lands &c. with rr. due from them, sum of one\'s income from r.; r.-service, (tenure by) personal service in lieu of or addition to r.; hence (of land &c., with low, high, &c.) -rented a. (Vb) take, occupy, use, at a r.; let or hire for r.; be let at specified r.; impose r. on (tenant; rents his tenants low); hence rentable a. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  60. n. A fissure; an opening made by rending; a break or breach made by force; —a tear; a split; —a schism; a separation. Cabinet Dictionary
  61. n. [Latin] A certain periodical profit money, previsions, or labour, issuing out of lands and tenements; rental; revenue; —the stipulated sum paid by a tenant annually, quarterly, monthly, or weekly, for the temporary use and possession of lands, moors, houses, rooms, &c. Cabinet Dictionary

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