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Definitions of run

  1. have a tendency or disposition to do or be something; be inclined; "She tends to be nervous before her lectures"; "These dresses run small"; "He inclined to corpulence" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. deal in illegally, such as arms or liquor Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. be diffused; "These dyes and colors are guaranteed not to run" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. run, stand, or compete for an office or a position; "Who's running for treasurer this year?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. the monthly discharge of blood from the uterus of nonpregnant women from puberty to menopause; "the women were sickly and subject to excessive menstruation"; "a woman does not take the gout unless her menses be stopped"--Hippocrates; "the semen begins to appear in males and to be emitted at the same time of life that the catamenia begin to flow in females"--Aristotle Wordnet Dictionary DB
  6. continue to exist; "These stories die hard"; "The legend of Elvis endures" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. the pouring forth of a fluid Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a race run on foot; "she broke the record for the half-mile run" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. perform as expected when applied; "The washing machine won't go unless it's plugged in"; "Does this old car still run well?"; "This old radio doesn't work anymore" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. guide or pass over something; "He ran his eyes over her body"; "She ran her fingers along the carved figurine"; "He drew her hair through his fingers" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. pursue for food or sport (as of wild animals); "Goering often hunted wild boars in Poland"; "The dogs are running deer"; "The Duke hunted in these woods" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. a row of unravelled stitches; "she got a run in her stocking" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. reduce or cause to be reduced from a solid to a liquid state, usually by heating; "melt butter"; "melt down gold"; "The wax melted in the sun" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. progress by being changed; "The speech has to go through several more drafts"; "run through your presentation before the meeting" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. direct or control; projects, businesses, etc.; "She is running a relief operation in the Sudan" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. travel a route regularly; "Ships ply the waters near the coast" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. compete in a race; "he is running the Marathon this year"; "let's race and see who gets there first" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. change or be different within limits; "Estimates for the losses in the earthquake range as high as $2 billion"; "Interest rates run from 5 to 10 percent"; "The instruments ranged from tuba to cymbals"; "My students range from very bright to dull" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. a score in baseball made by a runner touching all four bases safely; "the Yankees scored 3 runs in the bottom of the 9th"; "their first tally came in the 3rd inning" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. the act of running; traveling on foot at a fast pace; "he broke into a run"; "his daily run keeps him fit" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. a regular trip; "the ship made its run in record time" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. a short trip; "take a run into town" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. a football play in which a player runs with the ball; "the defensive line braced to stop the run"; "the coach put great emphasis on running" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  24. the act of testing something; "in the experimental trials the amount of carbon was measured separately"; "he called each flip of the coin a new trial" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  25. become undone, as of clothes such as knitted fabrics; "the sweater unraveled" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  26. extend or continue for a certain period of time; "The film runs 5 hours" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  27. an unbroken series of events; "had a streak of bad luck"; "Nicklaus had a run of birdies" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  28. (American football) a play in which a player runs with the ball; "the defensive line braced to stop the run"; "the coach put great emphasis on running" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  29. an unbroken chronological sequence; "the play had a long run on Broadway"; "the team enjoyed a brief run of victories" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  30. a race between candidates for elective office; "I managed his campaign for governor"; "he is raising money for a Senate run" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  31. the production achieved during a continuous period of operation (of a machine or factory etc.); "a daily run of 100,000 gallons of paint" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  32. unrestricted freedom to use; "he has the run of the house" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  33. the continuous period of time during which something (a machine or a factory) operates or continues in operation; "the assembly line was on a 12-hour run" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  34. become undone; "the sweater unraveled" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  35. come unraveled or undone as if by snagging; "Her nylons were running" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  36. cause to perform; "run a subject"; "run a process" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  37. change from one state to another; "run amok"; "run rogue"; "run riot" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  38. be operating, running or functioning; "The car is still running--turn it off!" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  39. carry out; "run an errand" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  40. cause to emit recorded sounds; "They ran the tapes over and over again"; "Can you play my favorite record?" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  41. include as the content; broadcast or publicize; "We ran the ad three times"; "This paper carries a restaurant review"; "All major networks carried the press conference" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  42. cover by running; run a certain distance; "She ran 10 miles that day" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  43. move fast by using one's feet, with one foot off the ground at any given time; "Don't run--you'll be out of breath"; "The children ran to the store" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  44. travel rapidly, by any (unspecified) means; "Run to the store!"; "She always runs to Italy, because she has a lover there" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  45. run with the ball; in such sports as football Wordnet Dictionary DB
  46. keep company; "the heifers run with the bulls ot produce offspring" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  47. sail before the wind Wordnet Dictionary DB
  48. flee; take to one's heels; cut and run; "If you see this man, run!"; "The burglars escaped before the police showed up" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  49. cause an animal to move fast; "run the dogs" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  50. move about freely and without restraint, or act as if running around in an uncontrolled way; "who are these people running around in the building?"; "She runs around telling everyone of her troubles"; "let the dogs run free" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  51. set animals loose to graze Wordnet Dictionary DB
  52. make without a miss Wordnet Dictionary DB
  53. carry out a process or program, as on a computer or a machine; "Run the dishwasher"; "run a new program on the Mac"; "the computer executed the instruction" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  54. occur persistently; "Musical talent runs in the family" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  55. stretch out over a distance, space, time, or scope; run or extend between two points or beyond a certain point; "Service runs all the way to Cranbury"; "His knowledge doesn't go very far"; "My memory extends back to my fourth year of life". Wordnet Dictionary DB
  56. cause something to pass or lead somewhere; "Run the wire behind the cabinet" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  57. be affected by; be subjected to; "run a temperature"; "run a risk" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  58. have a particular form; "the story or argument runs as follows"; "as the saying goes..." Wordnet Dictionary DB
  59. A small stream. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  60. of Run Webster Dictionary DB
  61. A number of cards of the same suit in sequence; as, a run of four in hearts. Webster Dictionary DB
  62. The movement communicated to a golf ball by running. Webster Dictionary DB
  63. The distance a ball travels after touching the ground from a stroke. Webster Dictionary DB
  64. To strike (the ball) in such a way as to cause it to run along the ground, as when approaching a hole. Webster Dictionary DB
  65. To move, proceed, advance, pass, go, come, etc., swiftly, smoothly, or with quick action; -- said of things animate or inanimate. Hence, to flow, glide, or roll onward, as a stream, a snake, a wagon, etc.; to move by quicker action than in walking, as a person, a horse, a dog. Webster Dictionary DB
  66. To go swiftly; to pass at a swift pace; to hasten. Webster Dictionary DB
  67. To flee, as from fear or danger. Webster Dictionary DB
  68. To steal off; to depart secretly. Webster Dictionary DB
  69. To contend in a race; hence, to enter into a contest; to become a candidate; as, to run for Congress. Webster Dictionary DB
  70. To exert continuous activity; to proceed; as, to run through life; to run in a circle. Webster Dictionary DB
  71. To pass or go quickly in thought or conversation; as, to run from one subject to another. Webster Dictionary DB
  72. To creep, as serpents. Webster Dictionary DB
  73. To flow, as a liquid; to ascend or descend; to course; as, rivers run to the sea; sap runs up in the spring; her blood ran cold. Webster Dictionary DB
  74. To proceed along a surface; to extend; to spread. Webster Dictionary DB
  75. To become fluid; to melt; to fuse. Webster Dictionary DB
  76. To turn, as a wheel; to revolve on an axis or pivot; as, a wheel runs swiftly round. Webster Dictionary DB
  77. To travel; to make progress; to be moved by mechanical means; to go; as, the steamboat runs regularly to Albany; the train runs to Chicago. Webster Dictionary DB
  78. To extend; to reach; as, the road runs from Philadelphia to New York; the memory of man runneth not to the contrary. Webster Dictionary DB
  79. To go back and forth from place to place; to ply; as, the stage runs between the hotel and the station. Webster Dictionary DB
  80. To make progress; to proceed; to pass. Webster Dictionary DB
  81. To continue in operation; to be kept in action or motion; as, this engine runs night and day; the mill runs six days in the week. Webster Dictionary DB
  82. To have a course or direction; as, a line runs east and west. Webster Dictionary DB
  83. To be in form thus, as a combination of words. Webster Dictionary DB
  84. To be popularly known; to be generally received. Webster Dictionary DB
  85. To have growth or development; as, boys and girls run up rapidly. Webster Dictionary DB
  86. To tend, as to an effect or consequence; to incline. Webster Dictionary DB
  87. To spread and blend together; to unite; as, colors run in washing. Webster Dictionary DB
  88. To have a legal course; to be attached; to continue in force, effect, or operation; to follow; to go in company; as, certain covenants run with the land. Webster Dictionary DB
  89. To continue without falling due; to hold good; as, a note has thirty days to run. Webster Dictionary DB
  90. To discharge pus or other matter; as, an ulcer runs. Webster Dictionary DB
  91. To be played on the stage a number of successive days or nights; as, the piece ran for six months. Webster Dictionary DB
  92. Specifically, of a horse: To move rapidly in a gait in which each leg acts in turn as a propeller and a supporter, and in which for an instant all the limbs are gathered in the air under the body. Webster Dictionary DB
  93. To cause to run (in the various senses of Run, v. i.); as, to run a horse; to run a stage; to run a machine; to run a rope through a block. Webster Dictionary DB
  94. To pursue in thought; to carry in contemplation. Webster Dictionary DB
  95. To cause to enter; to thrust; as, to run a sword into or through the body; to run a nail into the foot. Webster Dictionary DB
  96. To drive or force; to cause, or permit, to be driven. Webster Dictionary DB
  97. To fuse; to shape; to mold; to cast; as, to run bullets, and the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  98. To cause to be drawn; to mark out; to indicate; to determine; as, to run a line. Webster Dictionary DB
  99. To go through or accomplish by running; as, to run a race; to run a certain career. Webster Dictionary DB
  100. To cause to stand as a candidate for office; to support for office; as, to run some one for Congress. Webster Dictionary DB
  101. To encounter or incur, as a danger or risk; as, to run the risk of losing one's life. See To run the chances, below. Webster Dictionary DB
  102. To put at hazard; to venture; to risk. Webster Dictionary DB
  103. To discharge; to emit; to give forth copiously; to be bathed with; as, the pipe or faucet runs hot water. Webster Dictionary DB
  104. To be charged with, or to contain much of, while flowing; as, the rivers ran blood. Webster Dictionary DB
  105. To conduct; to manage; to carry on; as, to run a factory or a hotel. Webster Dictionary DB
  106. To tease with sarcasms and ridicule. Webster Dictionary DB
  107. To sew, as a seam, by passing the needle through material in a continuous line, generally taking a series of stitches on the needle at the same time. Webster Dictionary DB
  108. The act of running; as, a long run; a good run; a quick run; to go on the run. Webster Dictionary DB
  109. A small stream; a brook; a creek. Webster Dictionary DB
  110. That which runs or flows in the course of a certain operation, or during a certain time; as, a run of must in wine making; the first run of sap in a maple orchard. Webster Dictionary DB
  111. A course; a series; that which continues in a certain course or series; as, a run of good or bad luck. Webster Dictionary DB
  112. State of being current; currency; popularity. Webster Dictionary DB
  113. A continuing urgent demand; especially, a pressure on a bank or treasury for payment of its notes. Webster Dictionary DB
  114. A range or extent of ground for feeding stock; as, a sheep run. Webster Dictionary DB
  115. The aftermost part of a vessel's hull where it narrows toward the stern, under the quarter. Webster Dictionary DB
  116. The distance sailed by a ship; as, a good run; a run of fifty miles. Webster Dictionary DB
  117. A voyage; as, a run to China. Webster Dictionary DB
  118. A pleasure excursion; a trip. Webster Dictionary DB
  119. The horizontal distance to which a drift may be carried, either by license of the proprietor of a mine or by the nature of the formation; also, the direction which a vein of ore or other substance takes. Webster Dictionary DB
  120. A roulade, or series of running tones. Webster Dictionary DB
  121. The greatest degree of swiftness in marching. It is executed upon the same principles as the double-quick, but with greater speed. Webster Dictionary DB
  122. In baseball, a complete circuit of the bases made by a player, which enables him to score one; in cricket, a passing from one wicket to the other, by which one point is scored; as, a player made three runs; the side went out with two hundred runs. Webster Dictionary DB
  123. A pair or set of millstones. Webster Dictionary DB
  124. Melted, or made from molten material; cast in a mold; as, run butter; run iron or lead. Webster Dictionary DB
  125. Smuggled; as, run goods. Webster Dictionary DB
  126. To pass from one state or condition to another; to come into a certain condition; - often with in or into; as, to run into evil practices; to run in debt. Webster Dictionary DB
  127. To discuss; to continue to think or speak about something; - with on. Webster Dictionary DB
  128. To make numerous drafts or demands for payment, as upon a bank; - with on. Webster Dictionary DB
  129. To sail before the wind, in distinction from reaching or sailing closehauled; - said of vessels. Webster Dictionary DB
  130. To move rapidly by springing steps so that there is an instant in each step when neither foot touches the ground; - so distinguished from walking in athletic competition. Webster Dictionary DB
  131. To cause to pass, or evade, offical restrictions; to smuggle; - said of contraband or dutiable goods. Webster Dictionary DB
  132. To migrate or move in schools; - said of fish; esp., to ascend a river in order to spawn. Webster Dictionary DB
  133. Continued repetition on the stage; - said of a play; as, to have a run of a hundred successive nights. Webster Dictionary DB
  134. The act of migrating, or ascending a river to spawn; - said of fish; also, an assemblage or school of fishes which migrate, or ascend a river for the purpose of spawning. Webster Dictionary DB
  135. Run. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  136. To move or go on the feet at a swifter pace than a walk; travel; proceed; as, the express runs forty miles an hour; move on in a stream; flow; as, the river runs down hill; to be in action; as, the engine will not run; extend in space; as, the railroad runs through his land; continue in time; as, the play ran a year; pass into a different state or condition; as, to run to seed; of a wound or sore, discharge pus. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  137. To cause to move or act, as an engine, etc.; perform or go through with; as, to run errands; to flow with; as, the earth ran blood; expose oneself to; as, to run a risk; to sew; as, to run up a seam. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  138. Act of going at a swifter pace than a walk; a trip or journey; as, the boat made its usual run; act of flowing or that which flows; as, a run of maple sap; a course or succession; as, a run of ill luck; free use or enjoyment of; as, to have the run of a friend's house; sudden, pressing demand; as, a run on a bank; a place passed over frequently, especially by animals; an inclosed place in which to confine and feed animals; a brook; a period of operation, or the work turned out during the period; in cricket or baseball, the act of running from one wicket or base to another. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  139. Ran. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  140. Running. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  141. Popular term for purulent discharge or exudation. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  142. To move swiftly: to pass quickly on the ground: to flee: to go, as ships, etc.: to have course in any direction: to flow: to dart: to turn: to extend: to pierce: to melt: to be busied: to become: to be in force: to discharge matter, as a sore: to press, esp. for immediate payment. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  143. To cause to move swiftly: to force forward: to push: to cause to pass: to fuse: to discharge, as a sore: to pursue in thought: to incur:-pr.p. running; pa.t. ran; pa.p. run. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  144. Act of running: course: flow: discharge from a sore: distance sailed: a trip by trainmen from one division of a railroad to the next: voyage: continued series: general reception: prevalence: popular clamor: an unusual pressure, as on a bank, for payment of notes. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  145. Act of running; flow; course; voyage; small stream; unusual demand; tapering after-part of a ship. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  146. To cause to move swiftly; cause to pass; pursue; fuse; incur. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  147. To move swiftly; go; flow; extend; pierce; melt. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  148. To go swiftly; move or flow; continue; extend; be reported. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  149. The act of running or flowing; swift movement; a brook. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  150. A trip or journey. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  151. A course; succession. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  152. Melted; smuggled. In the long run, in the final result. The run of mankind, the generality of people. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  153. Act of running; course; flow; successful course; clamour; an uncommon pressure on a bank for payment; distance sailed over; a voyage; a pair of mill stones; a brook; a large grazing ground. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  154. To drive; to force; to cause to be driven; to fuse; to cast; to incur; to venture; to smuggle; to break through; to pursue in thought; to thrust; to draw; to cause to ply; to cause to pass; to discharge; to pursue. To run down a ressel, to run against and sink her. To run hard, to press with sarcasm or ridicule; to urge importunately. To run over, to narrate or run the eye over hastily. to run through, to expend. To run up. to increase. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  155. To move or pass swiftly on the ground with the legs; to use the legs in moving; to move in a hurry; to spread; to extend; to rush violently; to sail; to slide; to move; to contend in a race; to flee for escape; to flew in any manner; to move as a fluid; to melt; to turn; to go; to pass; to fall; to have a Course ; to carried; to shoot; to discharge matter; to continue in time; to press with numerous demands. To run after, to pursue or follow. To run at, to attack. To run in trust, to get credit. To run down a coast, to sail along it. To run on, to talk incessantly. To run over, to overflow. To run out, to come to an end; to be wasted or exhausted. To run riot, to go to the utmost excess. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  156. To go, move, or pass on a surface in almost any manner; to cause to move swiftly; to move on the ground by long quick steps; to rush violently; to fuse or melt; to become liquid; to take a course at sea; to drive with violence, as a ship ashore; to ply or pass, as a coach or ship; to move or flow, as water; to pursue; to contend in a race; to have success; to strive at, followed by after; to contract, as a debt, followed by into or in; to pass from one state or condition to another; to fall; to pass; to make transition; to proceed; to discharge matter, as a scre; to extend to. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  157. Flow; course; mtion; a pleasuretrip; continued success; an unusual demand on a bank for payment of its notes, and for the return of deposits; distance sailed by a ship; a voyage. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  158. To pass from one state or condition to another; to come into a certain condition; -- often with in or into; as, to run into evil practices; to run in debt. mso.anu.edu.au
  159. To discuss; to continue to think or speak about something; -- with on. mso.anu.edu.au
  160. To make numerous drafts or demands for payment, as upon a bank; -- with on. mso.anu.edu.au
  161. To sail before the wind, in distinction from reaching or sailing closehauled; -- said of vessels. mso.anu.edu.au
  162. To move rapidly by springing steps so that there is an instant in each step when neither foot touches the ground; -- so distinguished from walking in athletic competition. mso.anu.edu.au
  163. To cause to pass, or evade, offical restrictions; to smuggle; -- said of contraband or dutiable goods. mso.anu.edu.au
  164. To migrate or move in schools; -- said of fish; esp., to ascend a river in order to spawn. mso.anu.edu.au
  165. Continued repetition on the stage; -- said of a play; as, to have a run of a hundred successive nights. mso.anu.edu.au
  166. The act of migrating, or ascending a river to spawn; -- said of fish; also, an assemblage or school of fishes which migrate, or ascend a river for the purpose of spawning. mso.anu.edu.au
  167. To move, proceed, advance, pass, go, come, etc., swiftly, smoothly, or with quick action; said of things animate or inanimate. Hence, to flow, glide, or roll onward, as a stream, a snake, a wagon, etc.; to move by quicker action than in walking, as a person, a horse, a dog. dictgcide_fs
  168. To pass from one state or condition to another; to come into a certain condition; often with in or into; as, to run into evil practices; to run in debt. dictgcide_fs
  169. To discuss; to continue to think or speak about something; with on. dictgcide_fs
  170. To move rapidly by springing steps so that there is an instant in each step when neither foot touches the ground; so distinguished from walking in athletic competition. dictgcide_fs
  171. To cause to pass, or evade, offical restrictions; to smuggle; said of contraband or dutiable goods. dictgcide_fs
  172. To migrate or move in schools; said of fish; esp., to ascend a river in order to spawn. dictgcide_fs
  173. Continued repetition on the stage; said of a play; as, to have a run of a hundred successive nights. dictgcide_fs
  174. The act of migrating, or ascending a river to spawn; said of fish; also, an assemblage or school of fishes which migrate, or ascend a river for the purpose of spawning. dictgcide_fs
  175. In baseball, a complete circuit of the bases made by a player, which enables him to score one point; also, the point thus scored; in cricket, a passing from one wicket to the other, by which one point is scored; as, a player made three runs; the side went out with two hundred runs; the Yankees scored three runs in the seventh inning. dictgcide_fs
  176. run, v.i. to move swiftly on the legs, to hasten, rush on: to move, travel, ply regularly to: to pass by: to have a certain form: (law) to have legal authority: to be current, as money: to average: to reach, have course in any direction: to make a fault, to slip, as thread in knitting: to stand as a candidate: to pass from one state to another: to pass quickly in thought, to dwell repeatedly upon in thought: to continue in operation, be in constant motion, to be carried, to extend: to move swiftly: to pass quickly on the ground: to flee: to go, as ships, &c.: to have course in any direction, to extend, spread: to flow: to dart: to turn: to extend through a period: to pierce: to fuse or melt: to turn or rotate: to be busied: to become: to be in force: to discharge matter, as a sore: to have a general tendency: to pass, fall: to creep: to press with immediate demands for payment, as a bank.--v.t. to cause to move swiftly, to keep running: to force forward: to push: to cause to pass: to fuse: to discharge, as a sore: to pursue in thought: to incur: to pour forth: to execute: to chase: to break through, as to run the blockade: to pierce: to sew: to fish in: to evade: to manage: to tease:--pr.p. run'ning; pa.t. ran; pa.p. run, as 'run brandy,' that which has been smuggled in.--n. act of running: course: flow: discharge from a sore: distance sailed: voyage: continued series: general reception: prevalence: popular clamour: an unusual pressure, as on a bank, for payment: a trip: the run of events: a small stream: the quantity run: the act of migrating: in base-ball, the complete circuit made by the player which enables him to score one: in cricket, a passing from one wicket to another, by which one point is scored: a range of pasturage: a pair of millstones: the aftermost part of a ship's bottom: (mus.) a succession of consecutive notes: a roulade.--ns. RUN'ABOUT, a gadabout: a vagabond: an open wagon; RUN'AWAY, one who runs away from danger or restraint: a fugitive.--adj. fleeing from danger or restraint: done by or in flight.--ns. RUN'LET, RUN'NEL, a little run or stream: a brook; RUN'MAN, a deserter from a ship-of-war; RUN'NER, one who, or that which, runs: a racer: a messenger, agent, one employed to solicit patronage: a rooting stem that runs along the ground: a rope to increase the power of a tackle: a deserter: a smuggler: a manager of an engine: a Bow Street officer: in saddlery, a loop of metal through which a rein is passed: that on which anything slides: in moulding, a channel cut in a mould: the rotating-stone of a grinding-mill: the movable piece to which the ribs of an umbrella are attached: a tool in which lenses are fastened for polishing: a vessel for conveying fish, oysters, &c.--adj. RUN'NING, kept for the race: successive: continuous: flowing: easy: cursive: discharging matter.--prep. (coll.) approaching or about.--n. act of moving swiftly: that which runs or flows, the quantity run: a discharge from a wound: the act of one who risks dangers, as in running a blockade: strength to run: the ranging of any animal.--n. RUN'NING-BLOCK, a block in an arrangement of pulleys.--n.pl. RUN'NING-DAYS, the days occupied on a voyage, &c., under a charter, including Sundays.--ns. RUN'NING-FIGHT, a fight kept up between one party that flees and another that pursues; RUN'NING-FIRE (mil.), a rapid succession of firing; RUN'NING-GEAR, the wheels and axles of a vehicle; RUN'NING-HAND, a style of rapid writing without lifting the pen; RUN'NING-KNOT, a knot made so as to form a noose when the rope is pulled.--n.pl. RUN'NING-LIGHTS, the lights shown by vessels between sunset and sunrise.--adv. RUN'NINGLY.--ns. RUN'NING-OR'NAMENT, an ornament in which the design is continuous; RUN'NING-REIN, a form of driving-rein; RUN'NING-RIG'GING, all the rigging except the shrouds, stays, and lower mast-head pendants; RUN'NING-THRUSH, a disease in the feet of horses; RUN'NING-T[=I]'TLE, the title of a book, &c., continued from page to page on the upper margin; RUN'NING-TRAP, a pipe so formed as to be a seal against the passage of gases; RUN'WAY, a trail, track, or passage-way.--RUN ACROSS, to come upon by accident; RUN AWAY WITH, to carry away in uncontrollable fright: to carry off in fleeing; RUN DOWN, to chase to exhaustion: to run against and sink, as a ship: to overbear, to crush; RUN DOWN A COAST, to sail along it; RUN HARD, to press hard behind in a race or other competition; RUN IN, to go in: to arrest and take to a lock-up: (print.) to insert a word, &c., without making a break or new paragraph: to alter the position of matter to fill vacant space; RUN INTO DEBT, to get into debt; RUN IN THE BLOOD, family, to belong to one by natural descent; RUN OFF, to cause to flow out: to take impressions of, to print: to repeat, recount; RUN ON (print.), to continue in the same line, and not a new paragraph; RUN OUT, to come to an end; RUN OVER, to overflow: to go over cursorily; RUN RIOT (see RIOT); RUN THE CHANCE, to encounter all risks; RUN THROUGH, to expend, to waste, to pierce through and through; RUN TOGETHER, to mingle or blend; RUN TO SEED, to shoot up too rapidly, to become exhausted, to go to waste; RUN UP, to make or mend hastily: to build hurriedly: to string up, hang.--IN THE LONG-RUN, in the end or final result; IN THE RUNNING, or OUT OF THE RUNNING, competing, or not competing, in a contest, with good hopes of success in a candidature, &c., or the opposite; MAKE GOOD ONE'S RUNNING, to keep abreast with others; TAKE UP THE RUNNING, to go off at full speed; THE COMMON RUN, THE RUN, or THE RUN OF MANKIND, ordinary people. [A.S. rinnan; Ger. rennen, Ice. renna, to run.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  177. (ran, run; p.p. rarely as -ed (2), as a fresh-r. salmon). (Of men) progress by advancing each foot alternately never having both on ground at once (cf. WALK; running jump, in which jumper runs to the take-off), (of animals) go at quicker than walking pace, amble, trot, canter, gallop, &c.; (tart to) cross cricket pitch to score r.; flee, abscond, (chiefly now in r. for it, cut& r. slang; running fight naut., kept up by retreating ship or fleet with pursuer); go or travel hurriedly, precipitately, &c. (r. to meet one\'s troubles, anticipate them; r. RIOT; r. to help another; r. over or down or up, to place for flying visit; he who runs may read, said of easily intelligible exposition &c.); be allowed to grow or stray wild; compete in or in race (r. second &c., come in so), seek election &c. (for parliament, president, &c.); (of fish, ship, &c.) go straight& fast (a running whale; salmon r., go up river from sea; ship runs before the wind, into port, ashore, on the rocks, FOUL of or aboard another); advance (as) by rolling or on wheels, spin round or along, revolve (as) on axle, go with sliding or smooth or continuous or easy motion, be in action, work freely, be current or operative, (ball, carriage, wheel, spindle, sledge, time, runs; rope runs in pulley; his life runs smoothly; running knot, that slips along rope& enlarges or diminishes running noose; running hand, writing in which pen &c. is not lifted after each letter; how your tongue runs!, how incessantly you talk!; verse runs. is smooth; tune runs in head, seems to be heard over& over again; lease, contract, runs for seven &c. years; play ran 100 nights, was kept on stage; courage runs in the family, is found in all members of it; the works have ceased running; place where writs do not r., are not valid or respected); (of public conveyance by land or water) ply (from, to, between), (of fire, news, enthusiasm, &c.) spread rapidly from point to point (news ran like wild-fire; a cheer ran down the line; running fire, successive shots from different points); (of colour in fabric) spread from the dyed to the undyed parts; (of thought, eye, memory, &c.) pass in transitory or cursory way (thoughts r. through one\'s head; eyes r. over object; running commentary, touching on a point here& there; r. back over the past, survey it summarily); (of liquid, grain, sand, &c., also of vessel containing or object emitting &c., & fig.) flow, be wet, drip, flow with, (till the blood ran; ran blood; fountains r. wine; is running with oil; tide runs strong; river runs clear, thick; feeling ran high; one\'s blood runs cold, he is horrified; the sands are running out, time of grace &c. is nearly up; running sore, suppurating; nose, eyes, r., drop mucus or tears; r. at the nose; r. with sweat; r. dry, cease to flow, be exhausted; r. low, short, become scanty; candle runs, gutters); extend, be continuous, have a certain course or order, progress, proceed, have a tendency or common characteristic or average price or level. (fence runs round the house; running head-line, head, or title, repeated or different heading of page; whereof the memory of man runneth not to the contrary, phr. applied to immemorial tradition or custom; running account, = current ACCOUNT; road runs at right angles to, along, the ridge; story title, document, runs in these words; must not r. to extremes; runs to sentiment; our pears r. big this year, are so for the most part; prices r. high; oats r. 44 lb. to the bushel), (in part., placed after pl. n.) following each other without interval, in succession, (happened three days, hit the bull\'s-eye seven times, running); (w. cogn. obj.) pursue, follow, traverse, cover, make way swiftly through or over, wander about in, perform, essay or be exposed or submit to, (course, way, race, a mile, r. at cricket; things must r. their course, be left to themselves; r. a scent, follow it up; r. the streets, be street arab; r. errands, messages, be a messenger; the Derby was r. in a snow-storm; r. the GAUNTLET; r. RISKS; runs a chance of being, may be; r. rapids, shoot them; r. croquethoop, send ball clear through it; r. BLOCKADE); sew (fabric) slightly; chase, hunt, have running race with, (r. fox five miles; r. to earth, chase to its lair, & often fig. = discover after long search; will r. you for £50 a side; r. one hard or close, press him severely in race, competition, or comparative merit &c.); (in causative senses) make r. or go (r. cattle &c., turn out to graze; r. brandy, &c., smuggle it in by evading coast-guard &c.; r. ship aground, to New York; r. boat down to the water; r. train through; r. one\'s head against; r. cart into wall; r. sword, pin, into; r. one\'s hand, eye, along, down, over, something; r. rope through eyelet; r. coach, steamer, business, person, keep them going, manage them, conduct their operations; r. the show slang, dominate in an undertaking &c.; r. horse, send him in for race, so r. candidate; r. metal into mould; r. the water off; r. parallel, simile, &c., too far; ran his fingers, comb. through his hair; r. thing fine, leave very little margin of time or amount concerning it); runabout a., roving; runaway n. & a., fugitive, bolting (horse), r.-a. match or marriage, after elopement, r.-a. ring or knock, given at door by practical joker who immediately makes off. With prepp.; r. across, fall in with; r. after, pursue with attentions, seek society of, give much time to (pursuit &c.); r. against, fall in with; run at, assail by charging or rushing; r. in, incur debt; r. into, fall into (practice, absurdity, &c.), be continuous or coalesce with, have collision with, reach or attain (some length, five editions, &c.); r. on, be concerned with (talk, mind, runs on a subject); r. over, review, glance over, peruse, recapitulate, touch (notes of piano &c.) in quick succession, (of vehicle) pass over (prostrate person); r. through, examine cursorily, peruse, deal successively with, consume (estate &c.) by reckless or quick spending, pervade; r. to, reach (amount, number, &c.), have money or ability or (of money &c.) be enough for (some expense or undertaking), fall into (ruin), (of plants) tend to develop chiefly (seed), (of persons) indulge inclination towards (coarseness &c.); r. upon, (of thoughts &c.) be engrossed by, dwell on, (of person) encounter suddenly. With advv.; r. about, bustle, hurry from one person &c. to another, (esp. of children) play or wander without restraint; r. away, flee, abscond, elope, (of horse) bolt, (of horse or person) get clear away from competitors in race; r. away with, carry off (person, stolen property, &c.), accept (notion) hastily, (of expense &c.) consume (money &c.), (of horse &c.) bolt with (rider, carriage or its occupants); r. down, (of clock &c.) stop for want of winding, (of person or his health &c.) become enfeebled from overwork, poor feeding, &c. (also in p.p., as is, feels, much r. d.), knock down or collide with (person, ship, &c.), overtake (game, person) in pursuit, discover after search, disparage; r. in, (of combatant) rush to close quarters, (Rugby footb.) carry ball over opponents goal-line& touch it down, pay short visit (to person or house), (colloq.) arrest& take to prison, (colloq.) secure election of (candidate); r. off, flee, flow away, digress suddenly, write or recite (poem, list, &c.) fluently, drain (liquid) off, decide (race) after tie or trial heats; r. on, be joined together (of written characters), continue in operation, elapse, speak volubly, talk incessantly, (Print.) begin (t. & i. of sentence &c.) in same line as what precedes; r. out, come to an end (of period, also of stock of something or its owner; r. out of, exhaust one\'s stock of), escape from containing vessel, advance from block to hit ball in cricket, pass or be paid out (of rope), jut out, come out of contest in specified position &c. or complete required score &c., complete (race), advance (gun &c.) so as to project, put down wicket of (batsman while running), exhaust oneself by running; r. over, overflow (of vessel or contents), recapitulate, review, glance over; r. through, pierce with sword &c., draw line through (written words); r. up, grow quickly, rise in price, amount to, be Runner-up, accumulate (number, sum, debt) quickly, force (rival bidder) to bid higher, force up (price or commodity in that respect), erect (wall, house) to great height or in unsubstantial or hurried way; add up (column of figures). [Middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  178. Act or spell of running (have a r. for one\'s money, get some enjoyment &c. out of expenditure or effort, orig. w. ref. to scratching of horse after bets; had a good r., esp. in hunting or on ship, train, &c.; on the r., fleeing, also bustling about; at a r., running; a r. on the Continent, to Paris, &c., short excursion or visit); (Cricket) traversing of pitch by both batsmen without either\'s being put out, point scored thus or otherwise, notch; rhythmical motion, way things tend to move, direction, (cannot get the r. of the metre, or of some process or operation, see how it goes; the r. of the market was against us; the r. of the hills is N.W.); rapid fall (come down with a r., of building &c., person, mercury in barometer &c., prices, &c.); (Mus.) roulade; continuous stretch or spell or course, long series or succession, general demand, (a 500 ft r. of pipe; a long r. of power, office; a r. of luck; in the LONG r.; a r. on the bank, sudden demand from many customers for immediate payment; r. on rubber, book, &c., great demand for it; so book &c. has a considerable r.; r. on the red in rouge-et-noir, its coming many times running; play has a r. of 50 nights, a long r., &c.); common, general, average, or ordinary type or class (the common r. of men, average men), class or line of goods, batch or drove of animals born or reared together, shoal of fish in motion; regular track of some animals, enclosure for fowls &c., range of pasture (usu. sheep &c.-r.); trough for water to run in; part of ship\'s bottom narrowing towards stern; licence to make free use of (allowed him the r. of their books, house; the r. of one\'s teeth, free board); r.-in, act of running in (see prec.) at football; r.-off, deciding race after dead-heat; r.-up, race between greyhounds up to hare\'s first turn. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  179. To discharge pus or mucus. American pocket medical dictionary.
  180. n. Act of running;- motion; flow; also, a method or rate of running;- course; process;— will; unconstrained liberty;— state of being current; currency; prevalence;—a small stream; a brook; a creek; -a pressure on a bank or treasury for payment of its notes;- a range or extent of ground for feeding stock; - the distance sailed by a ship; voyage;- the aftmost part of a ship’s bottom;- the greatest degree of swiftness in marching. Cabinet Dictionary

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