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Definitions of sin

  1. commit a faux pas or fault Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. (colloquial) violent and excited activity; "they began to fight like sin" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. an act that is regarded by theologians as a transgression of God's will Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. estrangement from god Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. the 21st letter of the Hebrew alphabet Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. (Akkadian) god of the moon; counterpart of Sumerian Nanna Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. ratio of the opposite side to the hypotenuse of a right-angled triangle Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. commit a sin; violate a law of God or a moral law Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. violent and excited activity; "they began to fight like sin" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  10. commit a faux pas or a fault or make a serious mistake; "I blundered during the job interview" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  11. Old form of Since. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Transgression of the law of God; disobedience of the divine command; any violation of God's will, either in purpose or conduct; moral deficiency in the character; iniquity; as, sins of omission and sins of commission. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. An offense, in general; a violation of propriety; a misdemeanor; as, a sin against good manners. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. A sin offering; a sacrifice for sin. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. An embodiment of sin; a very wicked person. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To depart voluntarily from the path of duty prescribed by God to man; to violate the divine law in any particular, by actual transgression or by the neglect or nonobservance of its injunctions; to violate any known rule of duty; -- often followed by against. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To violate human rights, law, or propriety; to commit an offense; to trespass; to transgress. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. Wilful breaking of the divine law; violation of the laws of morality; a special case of such violation. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  19. To transgress, offend, or neglect the law of God or any duty; to commit evil deeds. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. To bring about by sin; to commit (a sin). The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. Sinner. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. Sinned. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. Sinning. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  24. Willful violation of law: neglect of duty: neglect of the laws of morality and religion: wickedness: iniquity. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  25. To commit sin: to violate or neglect the laws of morality or religion: to do wrong:-pr.p. sinning; pa.t. and pa.p. sinned. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  26. To commit sin; do wrong. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  27. Violation of moral or religious law; wickedness. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  28. To transgress or disregard the moral law. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. Any transgression of a moral law; a fault; error; offense. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. Want of conformity to, or more properly, positive wilful transgression of, the divine law; wickedness; iniquity; an offence; a sin-offering. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  31. To violate divine law; to offend against. Original sin, native sinfulness or disposition to sin. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  32. Any action, word, or thought contrary to the law of God; the habitual neglect of religion; transgression; the omission of duty; a wicked act. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  33. To violate any law of God; to do wrong. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  34. a city of Egypt, mentioned only by Ezekiel. ( Ezekiel 30:15 Ezekiel 30:16 ) The name is Hebrew, or at least Semitic, perhaps signifying clay . It is identified in the Vulgate with Pelusium, "the clayey or muddy" town. Its antiquity may perhaps be inferred from the mention of "the wilderness of Sin" in the journeys of the Israelites. ( Exodus 16:1 ; Numbers 33:11 ) Ezekiel speaks of Sin as "Sin the strongholds of Egypt." ( Ezekiel 30:15 ) This place was held by Egypt from that time until the period of the Romans. Herodotus relates that Sennacherib advanced against Pelusium, and that near Pelusium Cambyses defeated Psammenitus. In like manner the decisive battle in which Ochus defeated the last native king, Nectanebes, was fought near this city. biblestudytools.com
  35. is "any want of conformity unto or transgression of the law of God" ( 1 John 3:4 ; Romans 4:15 ), in the inward state and habit of the soul, as well as in the outward conduct of the life, whether by omission or commission ( Romans 6:12-17 ; 7:5-24 ). It is "not a mere violation of the law of our constitution, nor of the system of things, but an offence against a personal lawgiver and moral governor who vindicates his law with penalties. The soul that sins is always conscious that his sin is (1) intrinsically vile and polluting, and (2) that it justly deserves punishment, and calls down the righteous wrath of God. Hence sin carries with it two inalienable characters, (1) ill-desert, guilt (reatus); and (2) pollution (macula).", Hodge's Outlines. The moral character of a man's actions is determined by the moral state of his heart. The disposition to sin, or the habit of the soul that leads to the sinful act, is itself also sin ( Romans 6:12-17 ; Galatians 5:17 ; James 1:14 James 1:15 ). The origin of sin is a mystery, and must for ever remain such to us. It is plain that for some reason God has permitted sin to enter this world, and that is all we know. His permitting it, however, in no way makes God the author of sin. Adam's sin ( Genesis 3:1-6 ) consisted in his yielding to the assaults of temptation and eating the forbidden fruit. It involved in it, (1) the sin of unbelief, virtually making God a liar; and (2) the guilt of disobedience to a positive command. By this sin he became an apostate from God, a rebel in arms against his Creator. He lost the favour of God and communion with him; his whole nature became depraved, and he incurred the penalty involved in the covenant of works. Original sin. "Our first parents being the root of all mankind, the guilt of their sin was imputed, and the same death in sin and corrupted nature were conveyed to all their posterity, descending from them by ordinary generation." Adam was constituted by God the federal head and representative of all his posterity, as he was also their natural head, and therefore when he fell they fell with him ( Romans 5:12-21 ; 1 Corinthians 15:22-45 ). His probation was their probation, and his fall their fall. Because of Adam's first sin all his posterity came into the world in a state of sin and condemnation, i.e., (1) a state of moral corruption, and (2) of guilt, as having judicially imputed to them the guilt of Adam's first sin. "Original sin" is frequently and properly used to denote only the moral corruption of their whole nature inherited by all men from Adam. This inherited moral corruption consists in, (1) the loss of original righteousness; and (2) the presence of a constant proneness to evil, which is the root and origin of all actual sin. It is called "sin" ( Romans 6:12 Romans 6:14 Romans 6:17 ; 7:5-17 ), the "flesh" ( Galatians 5:17 Galatians 5:24 ), "lust" ( James 1:14 James 1:15 ), the "body of sin" ( Romans 6:6 ), "ignorance," "blindness of heart," "alienation from the life of God" ( Ephesians 4:18 Ephesians 4:19 ). It influences and depraves the whole man, and its tendency is still downward to deeper and deeper corruption, there remaining no recuperative element in the soul. It is a total depravity, and it is also universally inherited by all the natural descendants of Adam ( Romans 3:10-23 ; 5:12-21 ; 8:7 ). Pelagians deny original sin, and regard man as by nature morally and spiritually well; semi-Pelagians regard him as morally sick; Augustinians, or, as they are also called, Calvinists, regard man as described above, spiritually dead ( Ephesians 2:1 ; 1 John 3:14 ). The doctrine of original sin is proved, From the fact of the universal sinfulness of men. "There is no man that sinneth not" ( 1 Kings 8:46 ; Isaiah 53:6 ; Psalms 130:3 ; Romans 3:19 Romans 3:22 Romans 3:23 ; Galatians 3:22 ). biblestudytools.com
  36. is "any want of conformity unto or transgression of the law of God" ( 1 John 3:4 ; Romans 4:15 ), in the inward state and habit of the soul, as well as in the outward conduct of the life, whether by omission or commission ( Romans 6:12-17 ; 7:5-24 ). It is "not a mere violation of the law of our constitution, nor of the system of things, but an offence against a personal lawgiver and moral governor who vindicates his law with penalties. The soul that sins is always conscious that his sin is (1) intrinsically vile and polluting, and (2) that it justly deserves punishment, and calls down the righteous wrath of God. Hence sin carries with it two inalienable characters, (1) ill-desert, guilt (reatus); and (2) pollution (macula).", Hodge's Outlines. The moral character of a man's actions is determined by the moral state of his heart. The disposition to sin, or the habit of the soul that leads to the sinful act, is itself also sin ( Romans 6:12-17 ; Galatians 5:17 ; James 1:14 James 1:15 ). The origin of sin is a mystery, and must for ever remain such to us. It is plain that for some reason God has permitted sin to enter this world, and that is all we know. His permitting it, however, in no way makes God the author of sin. Adam's sin ( Genesis 3:1-6 ) consisted in his yielding to the assaults of temptation and eating the forbidden fruit. It involved in it, (1) the sin of unbelief, virtually making God a liar; and (2) the guilt of disobedience to a positive command. By this sin he became an apostate from God, a rebel in arms against his Creator. He lost the favour of God and communion with him; his whole nature became depraved, and he incurred the penalty involved in the covenant of works. Original sin. "Our first parents being the root of all mankind, the guilt of their sin was imputed, and the same death in sin and corrupted nature were conveyed to all their posterity, descending from them by ordinary generation." Adam was constituted by God the federal head and representative of all his posterity, as he was also their natural head, and therefore when he fell they fell with him ( Romans 5:12-21 ; 1 Corinthians 15:22-45 ). His probation was their probation, and his fall their fall. Because of Adam's first sin all his posterity came into the world in a state of sin and condemnation, i.e., (1) a state of moral corruption, and (2) of guilt, as having judicially imputed to them the guilt of Adam's first sin. "Original sin" is frequently and properly used to denote only the moral corruption of their whole nature inherited by all men from Adam. This inherited moral corruption consists in, (1) the loss of original righteousness; and (2) the presence of a constant proneness to evil, which is the root and origin of all actual sin. It is called "sin" ( Romans 6:12 Romans 6:14 Romans 6:17 ; 7:5-17 ), the "flesh" ( Galatians 5:17 Galatians 5:24 ), "lust" ( James 1:14 James 1:15 ), the "body of sin" ( Romans 6:6 ), "ignorance," "blindness of heart," "alienation from the life of God" ( Ephesians 4:18 Ephesians 4:19 ). It influences and depraves the whole man, and its tendency is still downward to deeper and deeper corruption, there remaining no recuperative element in the soul. It is a total depravity, and it is also universally inherited by all the natural descendants of Adam ( Romans 3:10-23 ; 5:12-21 ; 8:7 ). Pelagians deny original sin, and regard man as by nature morally and spiritually well; semi-Pelagians regard him as morally sick; Augustinians, or, as they are also called, Calvinists, regard man as described above, spiritually dead ( Ephesians 2:1 ; 1 John 3:14 ). The doctrine of original sin is proved, From the total depravity of man. All men are declared to be destitute of any principle of spiritual life; man's apostasy from God is total and complete ( Job 15:14-16 ; Genesis 6:5 Genesis 6:6 ). biblestudytools.com
  37. is "any want of conformity unto or transgression of the law of God" ( 1 John 3:4 ; Romans 4:15 ), in the inward state and habit of the soul, as well as in the outward conduct of the life, whether by omission or commission ( Romans 6:12-17 ; 7:5-24 ). It is "not a mere violation of the law of our constitution, nor of the system of things, but an offence against a personal lawgiver and moral governor who vindicates his law with penalties. The soul that sins is always conscious that his sin is (1) intrinsically vile and polluting, and (2) that it justly deserves punishment, and calls down the righteous wrath of God. Hence sin carries with it two inalienable characters, (1) ill-desert, guilt (reatus); and (2) pollution (macula).", Hodge's Outlines. The moral character of a man's actions is determined by the moral state of his heart. The disposition to sin, or the habit of the soul that leads to the sinful act, is itself also sin ( Romans 6:12-17 ; Galatians 5:17 ; James 1:14 James 1:15 ). The origin of sin is a mystery, and must for ever remain such to us. It is plain that for some reason God has permitted sin to enter this world, and that is all we know. His permitting it, however, in no way makes God the author of sin. Adam's sin ( Genesis 3:1-6 ) consisted in his yielding to the assaults of temptation and eating the forbidden fruit. It involved in it, (1) the sin of unbelief, virtually making God a liar; and (2) the guilt of disobedience to a positive command. By this sin he became an apostate from God, a rebel in arms against his Creator. He lost the favour of God and communion with him; his whole nature became depraved, and he incurred the penalty involved in the covenant of works. Original sin. "Our first parents being the root of all mankind, the guilt of their sin was imputed, and the same death in sin and corrupted nature were conveyed to all their posterity, descending from them by ordinary generation." Adam was constituted by God the federal head and representative of all his posterity, as he was also their natural head, and therefore when he fell they fell with him ( Romans 5:12-21 ; 1 Corinthians 15:22-45 ). His probation was their probation, and his fall their fall. Because of Adam's first sin all his posterity came into the world in a state of sin and condemnation, i.e., (1) a state of moral corruption, and (2) of guilt, as having judicially imputed to them the guilt of Adam's first sin. "Original sin" is frequently and properly used to denote only the moral corruption of their whole nature inherited by all men from Adam. This inherited moral corruption consists in, (1) the loss of original righteousness; and (2) the presence of a constant proneness to evil, which is the root and origin of all actual sin. It is called "sin" ( Romans 6:12 Romans 6:14 Romans 6:17 ; 7:5-17 ), the "flesh" ( Galatians 5:17 Galatians 5:24 ), "lust" ( James 1:14 James 1:15 ), the "body of sin" ( Romans 6:6 ), "ignorance," "blindness of heart," "alienation from the life of God" ( Ephesians 4:18 Ephesians 4:19 ). It influences and depraves the whole man, and its tendency is still downward to deeper and deeper corruption, there remaining no recuperative element in the soul. It is a total depravity, and it is also universally inherited by all the natural descendants of Adam ( Romans 3:10-23 ; 5:12-21 ; 8:7 ). Pelagians deny original sin, and regard man as by nature morally and spiritually well; semi-Pelagians regard him as morally sick; Augustinians, or, as they are also called, Calvinists, regard man as described above, spiritually dead ( Ephesians 2:1 ; 1 John 3:14 ). The doctrine of original sin is proved, From its early manifestation ( Psalms 58:3 ; Proverbs 22:15 ). biblestudytools.com
  38. is "any want of conformity unto or transgression of the law of God" ( 1 John 3:4 ; Romans 4:15 ), in the inward state and habit of the soul, as well as in the outward conduct of the life, whether by omission or commission ( Romans 6:12-17 ; 7:5-24 ). It is "not a mere violation of the law of our constitution, nor of the system of things, but an offence against a personal lawgiver and moral governor who vindicates his law with penalties. The soul that sins is always conscious that his sin is (1) intrinsically vile and polluting, and (2) that it justly deserves punishment, and calls down the righteous wrath of God. Hence sin carries with it two inalienable characters, (1) ill-desert, guilt (reatus); and (2) pollution (macula).", Hodge's Outlines. The moral character of a man's actions is determined by the moral state of his heart. The disposition to sin, or the habit of the soul that leads to the sinful act, is itself also sin ( Romans 6:12-17 ; Galatians 5:17 ; James 1:14 James 1:15 ). The origin of sin is a mystery, and must for ever remain such to us. It is plain that for some reason God has permitted sin to enter this world, and that is all we know. His permitting it, however, in no way makes God the author of sin. Adam's sin ( Genesis 3:1-6 ) consisted in his yielding to the assaults of temptation and eating the forbidden fruit. It involved in it, (1) the sin of unbelief, virtually making God a liar; and (2) the guilt of disobedience to a positive command. By this sin he became an apostate from God, a rebel in arms against his Creator. He lost the favour of God and communion with him; his whole nature became depraved, and he incurred the penalty involved in the covenant of works. Original sin. "Our first parents being the root of all mankind, the guilt of their sin was imputed, and the same death in sin and corrupted nature were conveyed to all their posterity, descending from them by ordinary generation." Adam was constituted by God the federal head and representative of all his posterity, as he was also their natural head, and therefore when he fell they fell with him ( Romans 5:12-21 ; 1 Corinthians 15:22-45 ). His probation was their probation, and his fall their fall. Because of Adam's first sin all his posterity came into the world in a state of sin and condemnation, i.e., (1) a state of moral corruption, and (2) of guilt, as having judicially imputed to them the guilt of Adam's first sin. "Original sin" is frequently and properly used to denote only the moral corruption of their whole nature inherited by all men from Adam. This inherited moral corruption consists in, (1) the loss of original righteousness; and (2) the presence of a constant proneness to evil, which is the root and origin of all actual sin. It is called "sin" ( Romans 6:12 Romans 6:14 Romans 6:17 ; 7:5-17 ), the "flesh" ( Galatians 5:17 Galatians 5:24 ), "lust" ( James 1:14 James 1:15 ), the "body of sin" ( Romans 6:6 ), "ignorance," "blindness of heart," "alienation from the life of God" ( Ephesians 4:18 Ephesians 4:19 ). It influences and depraves the whole man, and its tendency is still downward to deeper and deeper corruption, there remaining no recuperative element in the soul. It is a total depravity, and it is also universally inherited by all the natural descendants of Adam ( Romans 3:10-23 ; 5:12-21 ; 8:7 ). Pelagians deny original sin, and regard man as by nature morally and spiritually well; semi-Pelagians regard him as morally sick; Augustinians, or, as they are also called, Calvinists, regard man as described above, spiritually dead ( Ephesians 2:1 ; 1 John 3:14 ). The doctrine of original sin is proved, It is proved also from the necessity, absolutely and universally, of regeneration ( John 3:3 ; 2 co 5:17 ). biblestudytools.com
  39. is "any want of conformity unto or transgression of the law of God" ( 1 John 3:4 ; Romans 4:15 ), in the inward state and habit of the soul, as well as in the outward conduct of the life, whether by omission or commission ( Romans 6:12-17 ; 7:5-24 ). It is "not a mere violation of the law of our constitution, nor of the system of things, but an offence against a personal lawgiver and moral governor who vindicates his law with penalties. The soul that sins is always conscious that his sin is (1) intrinsically vile and polluting, and (2) that it justly deserves punishment, and calls down the righteous wrath of God. Hence sin carries with it two inalienable characters, (1) ill-desert, guilt (reatus); and (2) pollution (macula).", Hodge's Outlines. The moral character of a man's actions is determined by the moral state of his heart. The disposition to sin, or the habit of the soul that leads to the sinful act, is itself also sin ( Romans 6:12-17 ; Galatians 5:17 ; James 1:14 James 1:15 ). The origin of sin is a mystery, and must for ever remain such to us. It is plain that for some reason God has permitted sin to enter this world, and that is all we know. His permitting it, however, in no way makes God the author of sin. Adam's sin ( Genesis 3:1-6 ) consisted in his yielding to the assaults of temptation and eating the forbidden fruit. It involved in it, (1) the sin of unbelief, virtually making God a liar; and (2) the guilt of disobedience to a positive command. By this sin he became an apostate from God, a rebel in arms against his Creator. He lost the favour of God and communion with him; his whole nature became depraved, and he incurred the penalty involved in the covenant of works. Original sin. "Our first parents being the root of all mankind, the guilt of their sin was imputed, and the same death in sin and corrupted nature were conveyed to all their posterity, descending from them by ordinary generation." Adam was constituted by God the federal head and representative of all his posterity, as he was also their natural head, and therefore when he fell they fell with him ( Romans 5:12-21 ; 1 Corinthians 15:22-45 ). His probation was their probation, and his fall their fall. Because of Adam's first sin all his posterity came into the world in a state of sin and condemnation, i.e., (1) a state of moral corruption, and (2) of guilt, as having judicially imputed to them the guilt of Adam's first sin. "Original sin" is frequently and properly used to denote only the moral corruption of their whole nature inherited by all men from Adam. This inherited moral corruption consists in, (1) the loss of original righteousness; and (2) the presence of a constant proneness to evil, which is the root and origin of all actual sin. It is called "sin" ( Romans 6:12 Romans 6:14 Romans 6:17 ; 7:5-17 ), the "flesh" ( Galatians 5:17 Galatians 5:24 ), "lust" ( James 1:14 James 1:15 ), the "body of sin" ( Romans 6:6 ), "ignorance," "blindness of heart," "alienation from the life of God" ( Ephesians 4:18 Ephesians 4:19 ). It influences and depraves the whole man, and its tendency is still downward to deeper and deeper corruption, there remaining no recuperative element in the soul. It is a total depravity, and it is also universally inherited by all the natural descendants of Adam ( Romans 3:10-23 ; 5:12-21 ; 8:7 ). Pelagians deny original sin, and regard man as by nature morally and spiritually well; semi-Pelagians regard him as morally sick; Augustinians, or, as they are also called, Calvinists, regard man as described above, spiritually dead ( Ephesians 2:1 ; 1 John 3:14 ). The doctrine of original sin is proved, From the universality of death ( Romans 5:12-20 ). Various kinds of sin are mentioned, biblestudytools.com
  40. is "any want of conformity unto or transgression of the law of God" ( 1 John 3:4 ; Romans 4:15 ), in the inward state and habit of the soul, as well as in the outward conduct of the life, whether by omission or commission ( Romans 6:12-17 ; 7:5-24 ). It is "not a mere violation of the law of our constitution, nor of the system of things, but an offence against a personal lawgiver and moral governor who vindicates his law with penalties. The soul that sins is always conscious that his sin is (1) intrinsically vile and polluting, and (2) that it justly deserves punishment, and calls down the righteous wrath of God. Hence sin carries with it two inalienable characters, (1) ill-desert, guilt (reatus); and (2) pollution (macula).", Hodge's Outlines. The moral character of a man's actions is determined by the moral state of his heart. The disposition to sin, or the habit of the soul that leads to the sinful act, is itself also sin ( Romans 6:12-17 ; Galatians 5:17 ; James 1:14 James 1:15 ). The origin of sin is a mystery, and must for ever remain such to us. It is plain that for some reason God has permitted sin to enter this world, and that is all we know. His permitting it, however, in no way makes God the author of sin. Adam's sin ( Genesis 3:1-6 ) consisted in his yielding to the assaults of temptation and eating the forbidden fruit. It involved in it, (1) the sin of unbelief, virtually making God a liar; and (2) the guilt of disobedience to a positive command. By this sin he became an apostate from God, a rebel in arms against his Creator. He lost the favour of God and communion with him; his whole nature became depraved, and he incurred the penalty involved in the covenant of works. Original sin. "Our first parents being the root of all mankind, the guilt of their sin was imputed, and the same death in sin and corrupted nature were conveyed to all their posterity, descending from them by ordinary generation." Adam was constituted by God the federal head and representative of all his posterity, as he was also their natural head, and therefore when he fell they fell with him ( Romans 5:12-21 ; 1 Corinthians 15:22-45 ). His probation was their probation, and his fall their fall. Because of Adam's first sin all his posterity came into the world in a state of sin and condemnation, i.e., (1) a state of moral corruption, and (2) of guilt, as having judicially imputed to them the guilt of Adam's first sin. "Original sin" is frequently and properly used to denote only the moral corruption of their whole nature inherited by all men from Adam. This inherited moral corruption consists in, (1) the loss of original righteousness; and (2) the presence of a constant proneness to evil, which is the root and origin of all actual sin. It is called "sin" ( Romans 6:12 Romans 6:14 Romans 6:17 ; 7:5-17 ), the "flesh" ( Galatians 5:17 Galatians 5:24 ), "lust" ( James 1:14 James 1:15 ), the "body of sin" ( Romans 6:6 ), "ignorance," "blindness of heart," "alienation from the life of God" ( Ephesians 4:18 Ephesians 4:19 ). It influences and depraves the whole man, and its tendency is still downward to deeper and deeper corruption, there remaining no recuperative element in the soul. It is a total depravity, and it is also universally inherited by all the natural descendants of Adam ( Romans 3:10-23 ; 5:12-21 ; 8:7 ). Pelagians deny original sin, and regard man as by nature morally and spiritually well; semi-Pelagians regard him as morally sick; Augustinians, or, as they are also called, Calvinists, regard man as described above, spiritually dead ( Ephesians 2:1 ; 1 John 3:14 ). The doctrine of original sin is proved, "Presumptuous sins," or as literally rendered, "sins with an uplifted hand", i.e., defiant acts of sin, in contrast with "errors" or "inadvertencies" ( Psalms 19:13 ). biblestudytools.com
  41. is "any want of conformity unto or transgression of the law of God" ( 1 John 3:4 ; Romans 4:15 ), in the inward state and habit of the soul, as well as in the outward conduct of the life, whether by omission or commission ( Romans 6:12-17 ; 7:5-24 ). It is "not a mere violation of the law of our constitution, nor of the system of things, but an offence against a personal lawgiver and moral governor who vindicates his law with penalties. The soul that sins is always conscious that his sin is (1) intrinsically vile and polluting, and (2) that it justly deserves punishment, and calls down the righteous wrath of God. Hence sin carries with it two inalienable characters, (1) ill-desert, guilt (reatus); and (2) pollution (macula).", Hodge's Outlines. The moral character of a man's actions is determined by the moral state of his heart. The disposition to sin, or the habit of the soul that leads to the sinful act, is itself also sin ( Romans 6:12-17 ; Galatians 5:17 ; James 1:14 James 1:15 ). The origin of sin is a mystery, and must for ever remain such to us. It is plain that for some reason God has permitted sin to enter this world, and that is all we know. His permitting it, however, in no way makes God the author of sin. Adam's sin ( Genesis 3:1-6 ) consisted in his yielding to the assaults of temptation and eating the forbidden fruit. It involved in it, (1) the sin of unbelief, virtually making God a liar; and (2) the guilt of disobedience to a positive command. By this sin he became an apostate from God, a rebel in arms against his Creator. He lost the favour of God and communion with him; his whole nature became depraved, and he incurred the penalty involved in the covenant of works. Original sin. "Our first parents being the root of all mankind, the guilt of their sin was imputed, and the same death in sin and corrupted nature were conveyed to all their posterity, descending from them by ordinary generation." Adam was constituted by God the federal head and representative of all his posterity, as he was also their natural head, and therefore when he fell they fell with him ( Romans 5:12-21 ; 1 Corinthians 15:22-45 ). His probation was their probation, and his fall their fall. Because of Adam's first sin all his posterity came into the world in a state of sin and condemnation, i.e., (1) a state of moral corruption, and (2) of guilt, as having judicially imputed to them the guilt of Adam's first sin. "Original sin" is frequently and properly used to denote only the moral corruption of their whole nature inherited by all men from Adam. This inherited moral corruption consists in, (1) the loss of original righteousness; and (2) the presence of a constant proneness to evil, which is the root and origin of all actual sin. It is called "sin" ( Romans 6:12 Romans 6:14 Romans 6:17 ; 7:5-17 ), the "flesh" ( Galatians 5:17 Galatians 5:24 ), "lust" ( James 1:14 James 1:15 ), the "body of sin" ( Romans 6:6 ), "ignorance," "blindness of heart," "alienation from the life of God" ( Ephesians 4:18 Ephesians 4:19 ). It influences and depraves the whole man, and its tendency is still downward to deeper and deeper corruption, there remaining no recuperative element in the soul. It is a total depravity, and it is also universally inherited by all the natural descendants of Adam ( Romans 3:10-23 ; 5:12-21 ; 8:7 ). Pelagians deny original sin, and regard man as by nature morally and spiritually well; semi-Pelagians regard him as morally sick; Augustinians, or, as they are also called, Calvinists, regard man as described above, spiritually dead ( Ephesians 2:1 ; 1 John 3:14 ). The doctrine of original sin is proved, "Secret", i.e., hidden sins ( 19:12 ); sins which escape the notice of the soul. biblestudytools.com
  42. is "any want of conformity unto or transgression of the law of God" ( 1 John 3:4 ; Romans 4:15 ), in the inward state and habit of the soul, as well as in the outward conduct of the life, whether by omission or commission ( Romans 6:12-17 ; 7:5-24 ). It is "not a mere violation of the law of our constitution, nor of the system of things, but an offence against a personal lawgiver and moral governor who vindicates his law with penalties. The soul that sins is always conscious that his sin is (1) intrinsically vile and polluting, and (2) that it justly deserves punishment, and calls down the righteous wrath of God. Hence sin carries with it two inalienable characters, (1) ill-desert, guilt (reatus); and (2) pollution (macula).", Hodge's Outlines. The moral character of a man's actions is determined by the moral state of his heart. The disposition to sin, or the habit of the soul that leads to the sinful act, is itself also sin ( Romans 6:12-17 ; Galatians 5:17 ; James 1:14 James 1:15 ). The origin of sin is a mystery, and must for ever remain such to us. It is plain that for some reason God has permitted sin to enter this world, and that is all we know. His permitting it, however, in no way makes God the author of sin. Adam's sin ( Genesis 3:1-6 ) consisted in his yielding to the assaults of temptation and eating the forbidden fruit. It involved in it, (1) the sin of unbelief, virtually making God a liar; and (2) the guilt of disobedience to a positive command. By this sin he became an apostate from God, a rebel in arms against his Creator. He lost the favour of God and communion with him; his whole nature became depraved, and he incurred the penalty involved in the covenant of works. Original sin. "Our first parents being the root of all mankind, the guilt of their sin was imputed, and the same death in sin and corrupted nature were conveyed to all their posterity, descending from them by ordinary generation." Adam was constituted by God the federal head and representative of all his posterity, as he was also their natural head, and therefore when he fell they fell with him ( Romans 5:12-21 ; 1 Corinthians 15:22-45 ). His probation was their probation, and his fall their fall. Because of Adam's first sin all his posterity came into the world in a state of sin and condemnation, i.e., (1) a state of moral corruption, and (2) of guilt, as having judicially imputed to them the guilt of Adam's first sin. "Original sin" is frequently and properly used to denote only the moral corruption of their whole nature inherited by all men from Adam. This inherited moral corruption consists in, (1) the loss of original righteousness; and (2) the presence of a constant proneness to evil, which is the root and origin of all actual sin. It is called "sin" ( Romans 6:12 Romans 6:14 Romans 6:17 ; 7:5-17 ), the "flesh" ( Galatians 5:17 Galatians 5:24 ), "lust" ( James 1:14 James 1:15 ), the "body of sin" ( Romans 6:6 ), "ignorance," "blindness of heart," "alienation from the life of God" ( Ephesians 4:18 Ephesians 4:19 ). It influences and depraves the whole man, and its tendency is still downward to deeper and deeper corruption, there remaining no recuperative element in the soul. It is a total depravity, and it is also universally inherited by all the natural descendants of Adam ( Romans 3:10-23 ; 5:12-21 ; 8:7 ). Pelagians deny original sin, and regard man as by nature morally and spiritually well; semi-Pelagians regard him as morally sick; Augustinians, or, as they are also called, Calvinists, regard man as described above, spiritually dead ( Ephesians 2:1 ; 1 John 3:14 ). The doctrine of original sin is proved, "Sin against the Holy Ghost" (q.v.), or a "sin unto death" ( Matthew 12:31 Matthew 12:32 ; 1 John 5:16 ), which amounts to a wilful rejection of grace. Sin, a city in Egypt, called by the Greeks Pelusium, which means, as does also the Hebrew name, "clayey" or "muddy," so called from the abundance of clay found there. It is called by Ezekel ( Ezekiel 30:15 ) "the strength of Egypt, "thus denoting its importance as a fortified city. It has been identified with the modern Tineh, "a miry place," where its ruins are to be found. Of its boasted magnificence only four red granite columns remain, and some few fragments of others. These dictionary topics are fromM.G. Easton M.A., D.D., Illustrated Bible Dictionary, Third Edition,published by Thomas Nelson, 1897. Public Domain, copy freely.[N] indicates this entry was also found in Nave's Topical Bible[T] indicates this entry was also found in Torrey's Topical Textbook[B] indicates this entry was also found in Baker's Evangelical Dictionary[H] indicates this entry was also found in Hitchcock's Bible Names[J] indicates this entry was also found in Jack Van Impe's Prophecy Dictionary[S] indicates this entry was also found in Smith's Bible DictionaryBibliography InformationEaston, Matthew George. "Entry for Sin". "Easton's Bible Dictionary". . biblestudytools.com
  43. To depart voluntarily from the path of duty prescribed by God to man; to violate the divine law in any particular, by actual transgression or by the neglect or nonobservance of its injunctions; to violate any known rule of duty; often followed by against. dictgcide_fs
  44. sin, adv. (Spens.) since. [Since.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  45. sin, n. wilful violation of law: neglect of duty: neglect of the laws of morality and religion, any want of conformity unto, or transgression of, the law of God: wickedness, iniquity.--v.i. to commit sin: to violate or neglect the laws of morality or religion: to do wrong:--pr.p sin'ning; pa.t. and pa.p. sinned.--adjs. SIN'-BORN, born of sin; SIN'-BRED, produced by sin.--ns. SIN'-EAT'ER, one of a class of men formerly employed in Wales to eat a piece of bread and drink a cup of ale placed on a bier, and so symbolically take upon themselves the sins of the deceased--due to the notion of the Levitical scapegoat (Levit. xvi. 21, 22); SIN'-EAT'ING.--adj. SIN'FUL, full of, or tainted with, sin: iniquitous: wicked: depraved: criminal: unholy.--adv. SIN'FULLY.--n. SIN'FULNESS.--adj. SIN'LESS, without sin: innocent: pure: perfect.--adv. SIN'LESSLY.--ns. SIN'LESSNESS; SIN'NER, one who sins: an offender or criminal: (theol.) an unregenerate person.--v.i. (Pope) to act as a sinner (with indefinite it).--n. SIN'-OFF'ERING, an offering for, or sacrifice in expiation of, sin.--adjs. SIN'-SICK, morally sick from sin; SIN'-WORN, worn by sin.--LIKE SIN (slang), very much, very hard; MORTAL, or DEADLY, SIN, such as wilfully violates the divine law and separates the soul from God--seven deadly sins, pride, covetousness, lust, anger, gluttony, envy, and sloth; ORIGINAL SIN, the innate depravity and corruption of the whole nature due to the sin of Adam as federal representative of the human race, and transmitted by ordinary generation to all his posterity; VENIAL SIN, any transgression due to inadvertence, not alienating the friendship of God. [A.S. syn, sinn; Ice. syn-d, Ger. sünde, L. sons.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  46. Transgression, a transgression, against divine law or principles of morality (original s.; living in open s.; deadly or mortal s., such as kills the soul or is fatal to salvation; the seven deadly ss., pride, covetousness, lust, anger, gluttony, envy, sloth; one\'s besetting s., to which one is especially tempted; the unpardonable s., that described Matt. xii. 31-2; man of s. archaic or joc., reprobate, also Antichrist; like s. adv. slang, vehemently); offence against good taste, propriety, &c.; s.-offering, sacrifice &c. in expiation of s.; hence sinful, sinless, aa., sinfully, sinlessly, advv., sinfulness, sinlessness, nn. (Vb) commit s.; offend against; hence sinner n. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  47. more sinned against than sinning (esp. of transgressor seduced &c. into transgression). Concise Oxford Dictionary

What are the misspellings for sin?

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