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Definitions of start

  1. set in motion, cause to start; "The U.S. started a war in the Middle East"; "The Iraqis began hostilities"; "begin a new chapter in your life" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. begin an event that is implied and limited by the nature or inherent function of the direct object; "begin a cigar"; "She started the soup while it was still hot"; "We started physics in 10th grade" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. have a beginning, in a temporal, spatial, or evaluative sense; "The DMZ begins right over the hill"; "The second movement begins after the Allegro"; "Prices for these homes start at $250,000" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. have a beginning characterized in some specified way; "The novel begins with a murder"; "My property begins with the three maple trees"; "Her day begins with a work-out"; "The semester begins with a convocation ceremony" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. the time at which something begins; "They got an early start" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. the act of starting something; "he was responsible for the beginning of negotiations" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. leave; "The family took off for Florida" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. get off the ground; "Who started this company?"; "We embarked on an exciting enterprise"; "I start my day with a good breakfast"; "We began the new semester"; "The afternoon session begins at 4 PM"; "The blood shed started when the partisans launched a surprise attack" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  9. begin or set in motion; "I start at eight in the morning"; "Ready, set, go!" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. advantage gained by an early start as in a race; "with an hour's start he will be hard to catch" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. bring into being; "He initiated a new program"; "Start a foundation" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. a sudden involuntary movement; "he awoke with a start" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. a turn to be a starter (in a game at the beginning); "he got his start because one of the regular pitchers was in the hospital"; "his starting meant that the coach thought he was one of their best linemen" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. a signal to begin (as in a race); "the starting signal was a green light"; "the runners awaited the start" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. the beginning of anything; "it was off to a good start" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. play in the starting line-up, in team sports Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. move or jump suddenly, as if in surprise or alarm; "She startled when I walked into the room" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. begin work or acting in a certain capacity, office or job; "Take up a position"; "start a new job" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. a line indicating the location of the start of a race or a game Wordnet Dictionary DB
  20. the time at which something is supposed to begin; "they got an early start"; "she knew from the get-go that he was the man for her" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  21. take the first step or steps in carrying out an action; "We began working at dawn"; "Who will start?"; "Get working as soon as the sun rises!"; "The first tourists began to arrive in Cambodia"; "He began early in the day"; "Let's get down to work now" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. play in the starting line-up Wordnet Dictionary DB
  23. get going or set in motion; "We simply could not start the engine"; "start up the computer" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  24. A beginning. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. To leap; to jump. Newage Dictionary DB
  26. To move suddenly, as with a spring or leap, from surprise, pain, or other sudden feeling or emotion, or by a voluntary act. Newage Dictionary DB
  27. To set out; to commence a course, as a race or journey; to begin; as, to start business. Newage Dictionary DB
  28. To become somewhat displaced or loosened; as, a rivet or a seam may start under strain or pressure. Newage Dictionary DB
  29. To cause to move suddenly; to disturb suddenly; to startle; to alarm; to rouse; to cause to flee or fly; as, the hounds started a fox. Newage Dictionary DB
  30. To bring onto being or into view; to originate; to invent. Newage Dictionary DB
  31. To cause to move or act; to set going, running, or flowing; as, to start a railway train; to start a mill; to start a stream of water; to start a rumor; to start a business. Newage Dictionary DB
  32. To move suddenly from its place or position; to displace or loosen; to dislocate; as, to start a bone; the storm started the bolts in the vessel. Newage Dictionary DB
  33. To pour out; to empty; to tap and begin drawing from; as, to start a water cask. Newage Dictionary DB
  34. The act of starting; a sudden spring, leap, or motion, caused by surprise, fear, pain, or the like; any sudden motion, or beginning of motion. Newage Dictionary DB
  35. A convulsive motion, twitch, or spasm; a spasmodic effort. Newage Dictionary DB
  36. A sudden, unexpected movement; a sudden and capricious impulse; a sally; as, starts of fancy. Newage Dictionary DB
  37. The beginning, as of a journey or a course of action; first motion from a place; act of setting out; the outset; -- opposed to finish. Newage Dictionary DB
  38. A tail, or anything projecting like a tail. Newage Dictionary DB
  39. The handle, or tail, of a plow; also, any long handle. Newage Dictionary DB
  40. The curved or inclined front and bottom of a water-wheel bucket. Newage Dictionary DB
  41. The arm, or level, of a gin, drawn around by a horse. Newage Dictionary DB
  42. To move suddenly and quickly; spring; leap; bound; to make a startled movement or spring, as from surprise, etc.; set out; as, to start on a journey; begin a race, career, etc.; as, to start in business; become loosened. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  43. To originate action in, or set going; as, to start a clock; rouse suddenly from concealment; as, to start a hare; originate or begin; as, to start a quarrel; to draw from a cask or draw the contents from. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  44. A sudden motion or twitch, as of pain, joy, etc.; a quick spring; a going forth; as, an early start; outset; as, get it right at the start; a beginning; as, a start in business; lead; as, he had the start of them. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  45. Starter. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  46. To move suddenly aside: to wince: to deviate: to begin. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  47. To cause to move suddenly: to disturb suddenly: to rouse suddenly from concealment: to set in motion: to call forth: to invent or discover: to move suddenly from its place: to loosen: to empty: to pour out. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  48. A sudden movement: a sudden motion of the body: a sudden rousing to motion: an unexpected movement: a sally: a sudden fit: a quick spring: the first motion from a point or place: the outset. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  49. A sudden movement; spring; beginning of motion; outset. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  50. To cause to start; rouse; set in motion; originate; loosen. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  51. To move suddenly; spring; beging. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  52. To set in motion or action; rouse; stir. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  53. To originate; begin. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  54. To call forth; evoke. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  55. To make a startled movement. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  56. To set out; begin. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  57. To become loose. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  58. A quick, startled movement. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  59. Distance in advance. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  60. A sudden motion or twitch from alarm, &c.; a spring; excitement; a sally; a sudden fit; a quick spring; a darting; act of setting out. To get the start, to begin before another. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  61. To alarm; to startle; to rouse suddenly from concealment; to raise; to invent; to move suddenly from its place; to empty. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  62. To move suddenly, as it by a twitch or an involuntary shrinking; to move, as with a spring or leap; to shrink; to wince; to move suddenly aside; to move out of place; to set out; to commence. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  63. A sudden and momentary twitching motion of the body; a sudden motion of the body caused by fear; a sudden rousing to action; a sudden fit; a quick spring; first motion from a place; act of setting out; advantage in the outset. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  64. To disturb suddenly, as by fear or ill news; to bring or put into motion; to move suddenly; to shift from its place; to set out; to commence; to bring into view or notice. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  65. To set out; to commence a course, as a race or journey; to begin; as, to start in business. dictgcide_fs
  66. To bring into being or into view; to originate; to invent. dictgcide_fs
  67. The beginning, as of a journey or a course of action; first motion from a place; act of setting out; the outset; opposed to finish. dictgcide_fs
  68. The arm, or lever, of a gin, drawn around by a horse. dictgcide_fs
  69. A Treaty between the United States and the Soviet Union which provided for stepwise reductions in the number of nuclear weapons possessed by each country. dictgcide_fs
  70. stärt, v.i. to move suddenly aside: to wince: to deviate: to begin: to proceed: to give way somewhat.--v.t. to cause to move suddenly: to disturb suddenly: to rouse suddenly from concealment: to set in motion: to call forth: to invent or discover: to move suddenly from its place: to loosen: to empty: to pour out.--n. a sudden movement: a sudden motion of the body: a sudden rousing to action: an unexpected movement: a sally: a sudden fit: a quick spring: the first motion from a point or place: the outset.--n. START'ER, one who starts.--adj. START'FUL, apt to start.--adv. START'INGLY (Shak.), by fits or starts.--ns. START'ING-POINT, the point from which anything starts, or from which motion begins; START'ING-POST, the post or barrier from which the competitors in a race start or begin the race.--adj. START'ISH, apt to start, skittish.--ns. START'-UP (Shak.), an upstart; START'UPPE (Spens.), a kind of high shoe or half-boot.--START AFTER, to set out after, to pursue; START UP, to rise suddenly, to come suddenly into notice.--GET, or HAVE, THE START, to begin before another, to obtain an advantage over another. [M. E. sterten; closely akin to Dut. and Low Ger. storten, to plunge, Ger. stürzen.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  71. Make sudden movement from pain, surprise, &c., as started in his seat, started at the sound of my voice; change position abruptly as from shock or sudden impulse, as s. aside, from one\'s chair; (of timbers &c.) spring from proper position, give way; set out, begin journey, as we s. at six; make a beginning (on journey, enterprise, book, cigar, &c.); begin (work, doing, colloq. or vulg. to do); s. in (colloq.), begin (to do); s. out (colloq.), take steps as intending (to do); s. up, rise suddenly e.g. from seat, arise, come into existence or action, occur to the mind, as many difficulties, rivals, have started up; rouse (game) from lair &c.; originate, set going, (enterprise, newspaper, business, clock after winding, objections, quarrel, &c.); cause or enable (person) to commence business &c.; give signal to (persons) to s. in race; cause or experience the starting of (timbers, tooth, &c.); (Naut.) pour out (liquor) from cask; to s. with, in the first place, as you have no right to be here, to s. with, at the beginning, as had 6 members to s. with. [middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  72. Sudden movement of surprise, pain, &c.; (pl.) intermittent or spasmodic efforts or movements, esp. (works) by fits& ss.; beginning of journey or action or race, as shall make an early s. for town, is difficult work at the s., the s. is fixed for 3 p.m.; starting-place of race; advantage conceded in race, as will give you 60 yards s., 15 seconds s.; advantageous position gained in business &c., as got a good s. in life, got the s. of (gained advantage over) his rivals. [middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  73. n. A sudden spring, leap, or motion occasioned by surprise, fear, pain, or the like ;-a convulsive twitch or spasm ;-a wanton or unexpected movement ; a sally;-act of setting out; outset ;.-a push ; a shove ;-hence, alarm ; fright. Cabinet Dictionary
  74. n. [Anglo-Saxon, German] A projection; a push; a horn; a tail. Cabinet Dictionary

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