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Definitions of witness

  1. (law) a person who attests to the genuineness of a document or signature by adding their own signature Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. perceive or be contemporaneous with; "We found Republicans winning the offices"; "You'll see a lot of cheating in this school"; "I want to see results"; "The 1960 saw the rebellion of the younger generation against established traditions"; "I want to see results" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  3. someone who sees an event and reports what happened Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a close observer; someone who looks at something (such as an exhibition of some kind); "the spectators applauded the performance"; "television viewers"; "sky watchers discovered a new star" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. testimony by word or deed to your religious faith Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. (law) a person who testifies under oath in a court of law Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. be a witness to Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. Attestation of a fact or an event; testimony. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. That which furnishes evidence or proof. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. One who is cognizant; a person who beholds, or otherwise has personal knowledge of, anything; as, an eyewitness; an earwitness. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. One who testifies in a cause, or gives evidence before a judicial tribunal; as, the witness in court agreed in all essential facts. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. One who sees the execution of an instrument, and subscribes it for the purpose of confirming its authenticity by his testimony; one who witnesses a will, a deed, a marriage, or the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To see or know by personal presence; to have direct cognizance of. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To give testimony to; to testify to; to attest. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To see the execution of, as an instrument, and subscribe it for the purpose of establishing its authenticity; as, to witness a bond or a deed. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To bear testimony; to give evidence; to testify. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A person who testifies under oath at a deposition or trial, providing firsthand or expert evidence. In addition, the term also refers to someone who watches another person sign a document and then adds his name to confirm (called "attesting") that the signature is genuine.
  18. The act of declaring, or one who declares that he has, personal knowledge of the truth of a stated fact or event; testimony; evidence; a person who testifies in court under oath; one who puts his signature to a document to show that he has seen it signed. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  19. To look on at, so as to have personal knowledge; to have direct knowledge of; to testify to; to see. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. To testify. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. Knowledge brought in proof: testimony of a fact: that which furnishes proof: one who sees or has personal knowledge of a thing: one who attests. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. To have direct knowledge of: to see: to give testimony to. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  23. To give evidence. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  24. Testimony; one who testifies; one who has direct knowledge of: one who attests. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  25. To have direct knowledge of; see; attest. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  26. To see or know by personal experience; testify; attest; give evidence. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. A person who has seen or known something; a spectator. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. One who or that which furnishes evidence or proof; attestation. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. Testimony; attestation of a fact or event; that which furnishes evidence or proof; a person who knows or sees anything; one personally present; one who sees the execution of an instrument and subscribes it, to confirm its authenticity by his testimony; one who gives testimony in a court of justice. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. To see or know by personal presence; to attest; to give testimony to; to testify to something; to see the execution of an instrument, and subscribe it as witness of its authenticity; in the imperative, see, in evidence or proof. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  31. To bear testimony; to give evidence. With a witness, effectually; with great force. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  32. Testimony; knowledge or matter adduced in proof; a person who sees or knows anything; one present; one who gives evidence; one who sees the execution of a will, a deed, or suchlike, and adhibits his name to it to confirm its authenticity. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  33. To see or know by personal presence; to attest; to give testimony to; to give evidence; impera. see, in evidence or proof-as, witness my hand. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  34. 1. Person who sees a document signed. 2. Person called to court to testify and give evidence. thelawdictionary.org
  35. In the primary sense of the word, a witness is a person who has _knowledge of an event. As the most direct | mode of acquiring knowledge of an eventis by seeing it, "witness" has acquired the sense of a person who is present at andobserves a transaction. Sweet See State v. Desforges, 47 La. Ann. 1167, 17 South. 811;In re Ix>-U see's Will, 13 Misc. Rep. 298, 34 N. Y. Supp. 1120; Bliss v. Shuman, 47 Me. 248.A witness is a person whose declaration under oath (or affirmation) is received asevidence for any purpose, whether such declara-Vtion be made on oral examination or by deposition or affidavit Code Civ. Proc. Cal. {1878; Gen. St. Minn. 1878, c. 73, thelawdictionary.org
  36. To subscribe one's name to a deed, will, or other document, for the purposeof attesting its autheuticity, and prov- thelawdictionary.org
  37. Among people with whom writing is not common the evidence of a transaction is given by some tangible memorial or significant ceremony: Abraham gave seven ewe-lambs to Abimelech as an evidence of his property in the well of Beersheba. Jacob raised a heap of stones, "the heap of witness." as a boundary-mark between himself and Laban. ( Genesis 21:30 ; Genesis 31:47 Genesis 31:52 ) The tribes of Reuben and Gad raised an "altar" as a witness to the covenant between themselves and the rest of the nation. Joshua set up a stone as an evidence of the allegiance promised by Israel to God. ( Joshua 22:10 Joshua 22:26 Joshua 22:34 ; Joshua 24:26 Joshua 24:27 ) But written evidence was by no means unknown to the Jews. Divorce was to be proved by a written document. ( deuteronomy 24:1 deuteronomy 24:3 ) In civil contracts, at least in later times documentary evidence was required and carefully preserved. ( Isaiah 8:16 ; Jeremiah 32:10-16 ) On the whole the law was very careful to provide and enforce evidence for all its infractions and all transactions bearing on them. Among special provisions with respect to evidence are the following: 1. Two witnesses at least are required to establish any charge. ( Numbers 35:30 ; 17:6 ; John 8:17 ; 2 Corinthians 13:1 ) comp. 1Tim 5:19 2. In the case of the suspected wife, evidence besides the husbands was desired. ( Numbers 5:13 ) 3. The witness who withheld the truth was censured. ( Leviticus 5:1 ) 4. False witness was punished with the penalty due to the offence which it sought to establish. 5. Slanderous reports and officious witness are discouraged. ( Exodus 20:16 ; 23:1 ; Leviticus 18:16 Leviticus 18:18 ) etc. 6. The witnesses were the first executioners. ( 15:9 ; 17:7 ; Acts 7:58 ) 7. In case of an animal left in charge and torn by wild beasts, the keeper was to bring the carcass in proof of the fact and disproof of his own criminality. ( Exodus 22:13 ) 8. According to Josephus, women and slaves were not admitted to bear testimony. In the New Testament the original notion of a witness is exhibited in the special form of one who attests his belief in the gospel by personal suffering. Hence it is that the use of the ecclesiastical term ("martyr." the Greek word for "witness," has arisen. biblestudytools.com
  38. More than one witness was required in criminal cases ( Deuteronomy 17:6 ; 19:15 ). They were the first to execute the sentence on the condemned ( Deuteronomy 13:9 ; 17:7 ; 1 Kings 21:13 ; Matthew 27:1 ; Acts 7:57 Acts 7:58 ). False witnesses were liable to punishment ( Deuteronomy 19:16-21 ). It was also an offence to refuse to bear witness ( Leviticus 5:1 ). biblestudytools.com
  39. wit'nes, n. knowledge brought in proof: testimony of a fact: that which furnishes proof: one who sees or has personal knowledge of a thing: one who attests.--v.t. to have direct knowledge of: to see: to give testimony to: to show: (Shak.) to foretell.--v.i. to give evidence.--ns. WIT'NESS-BOX, the enclosure in which a witness stands when giving evidence in a court of law; WIT'NESSER.--WITH A WITNESS (Shak.), to a great degree. [A.S. witnes, testimony--witan, to know.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  40. Testimony, evidence, (bear w. to or of, state one\'s belief in, state facts tending to establish), thing stated by way of evidence (my w. is not true; archaic), confirmation (stands there in w. of the event; call to w., appeal to for confirmation); thing or person whose existence, position, state, &c., serves as testimony to or proof of (is a living w. to my clemency); (also EYE-w.) spectator of incident, bystander, person present at event; person giving sworn testimony in law-court or for legal purposes (w. often used for the w.); person attesting genuineness of signature to document by adding his signature; w.-box, enclosure in law-court reserved for ww. (Vb) state in evidence (noun, that, &c.; archaic); give evidence (against, for), serve as evidence (usu. against, for, to; w. or as w. my poverty, of which let my poverty be the proof); be a or the w. (archaic; w. Heaven!, I call Heaven to w.); indicate, serve as evidence of, (a deathly pallor witnessed his agitation); see, be spectator of; sign (document) as w. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  41. n. [Anglo-Saxon] Attestation of a fact or event ; testimony ;—that which furnishes evidence or proof ;—one who beholds or otherwise has personal knowledge of any thing ;— one who gives evidence before a judicial tribunal ;— one who sees the execution of an instrument, and subscribes it for the purpose of confirming its authenticity by his testimony ;—one who gives testimony. Cabinet Dictionary

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