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Definitions of escutcheon

  1. a flat protective covering (on a door or wall etc) to prevent soiling by dirty fingers Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a shield; especially one displaying a coat of arms Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. (nautical) a plate on a ship's stern on which the name is inscribed Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. The surface, usually a shield, upon which bearings are marshaled and displayed. The surface of the escutcheon is called the field, the upper part is called the chief, and the lower part the base (see Chiff, and Field.). That side of the escutcheon which is on the right hand of the knight who bears the shield on his arm is called dexter, and the other side sinister. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. A marking upon the back of a cow's udder and the space above it (the perineum), formed by the hair growing upward or outward instead of downward. It is esteemed an index of milking qualities. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. That part of a vessel's stern on which her name is written. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. A thin metal plate or shield to protect wood, or for ornament, as the shield around a keyhole. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. The depression behind the beak of certain bivalves; the ligamental area. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. A shield on which the heraldic arms, or coat of arms, of a family are shown. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. A shield on which a coat of arms is represented: a family shield: the part of a vessel's stern bearing her name. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  11. Shield bearing a coat-of-arms. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  12. A heraldic shield. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  13. The shield on which a coat of arms is represented; the shield of a family; the picture of ensigns armorial; the part of a ship's sterb where her name is printed. Escutcheon of pretence, that on which a man carries his wife's coat of arms when she is the heiress of her family. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  14. The shield on which a coat of arms is represented; a hatchment; picture of the ensigns armorial. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  15. See under escuage. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  16. The area on the rump of many quadrupeds which is either variously coloured or has the hair specially arranged ; the mesoscutellum of certain insects ; the ligamental area of certain bivalves. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.
  17. [Old French] Area on rump of many quadrupeds which is either variously coloured or has the hair specially arranged; mesoscutellum of certain insects; ligamental area of certain bivalves. na
  18. es-kuch'un, n. a shield on which a coat of arms is represented: a family shield: the part of a vessel's stern bearing her name.--adj. ESCUTCH'EONED ('und), having an escutcheon.--ESCUTCHEON OF PRETENCE, an escutcheon placed with the arms of an heiress in the centre of her husband's coat.--A BLOT ON THE ESCUTCHEON, a stain on one's good name. [O. Fr. escuchon--L. scutum, a shield.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  19. Shield with armorial bearings; a blot on his e. (stain on reputation); middle of ship\'s stern where name is placed. [old Northern French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  20. The name sometimes given to the crinkly coarse hairs on the mons veneris in the adult. [Old Fr] Appleton's medical dictionary.
  21. (Naut.) The place in a ship's stern where her name is. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  22. [Fr., shield.] (Her.) A shield on which armorial bearings are painted. If it be divided into three equal parts by horizontal lines, the upper part is called the chief, the lower part the base, and the middle part the fess. A is called the dexter chief, B the middle chief, C the sinister chief, D the honour point, E the fess point, F the nombril [Fr., L.] or navel point, G the dexter base, H the middle base, I the sinister base. An E. of pretence is the small shield in the centre of his own, on which a man bears the coat of arms of his wife, if she is an heiress (to show his pretension to her lands). Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  23. n. [French] The shield; the field or ground on which a coat of arms is represented; also, the shield of a family. The two sides of an escutcheon are respectively designated as dexter and sinister, as in the cut, and the different parts or points by the following names: A, dexter chief point; B, middle chief point; C, sinister chief point; D, honour or collar point; E, fesse or heart point; F, nombril or navel point; G, dexter base point; H, middle base point; I, sinister base point; —that part of a vessel’s stern on which her name is written. Cabinet Dictionary
  24. The shield of the family, the picture of the ensigns armorial. Complete Dictionary

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