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Definitions of humour

  1. the liquid parts of the body Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. put into a good mood Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the trait of appreciating (and being able to express) the humorous; "she didn't appreciate my humor"; "you can't survive in the army without a sense of humor" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. the quality of being funny; "I fail to see the humor in it" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. one of the four fluids in the body whose balance was believed (in ancient and medieval physiology) to determine your emotional and physical state; "the humors are blood and phlegm and yellow and black bile" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a characteristic (habitual or relatively temporary) state of feeling; "whether he praised or cursed me depended on his temper at the time"; "he was in a bad humor" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a message whose ingenuity or verbal skill or incongruity has the power to evoke laughter Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. (Middle Ages) one of the four fluids in the body whose balance was believed to determine your emotional and physical state; "the humors are blood and phlegm and yellow and black bile" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  9. Moisture; a fluid of animal bodies; an animal fluid in a vitiated state; cutaneous eruption; turn of mind, or peculiarity of disposition; temper; caprice; whim; a deep, kindly, playful sympathy of feeling and fancy, with all kinds of, especially lowly, and even outcast, things. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  10. To fall in with the humour of; to indulge by compliance. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  11. Turn or temper of mind; the talent which perceives and generalises the peculiarities of persons or circumstances in a witty and kindly manner; caprice; present disposition. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  12. To gratify by yielding to a particular inclination or desire; to indulge. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  13. The fluid of the eye; any fluid or juice. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.
  14. [Latin] Any fluid or juice; the fluid of the eye. na
  15. h[=u]'mur, or [=u]'mur, n. the moisture or fluids of animal bodies: an animal fluid in an unhealthy state: state of mind (because once thought to depend on the humours of the body), as 'good' and 'ill humour:' disposition: caprice: a mental quality which delights in ludicrous and mirthful ideas: playful fancy.--v.t. to go in with the humour of: to gratify by compliance.--adj. H[=U]'MORAL, pertaining to or proceeding from the humours.--ns. H[=U]'MORALISM, the state of being humoral: the doctrine that diseases have their seat in the humours; H[=U]'MORALIST, one who favours the doctrine of humoralism; HUMORESQUE', a musical caprice; H[=U]'MORIST, one whose conduct and conversation are regulated by humour or caprice: one who studies or portrays the humours of people: one possessed of humour: a writer of comic stories.--adjs. HUMORIS'TIC, humorous; H[=U]'MORLESS, without humour; H[=U]'MOROUS, governed by humour: capricious: irregular: full of humour: exciting laughter.--adv. H[=U]'MOROUSLY.--n. H[=U]'MOROUSNESS.--adj. H[=U]'MOURSOME, capricious, petulant.--n. H[=U]'MOURSOMENESS.--Out of humour, out of temper, displeased; THE NEW HUMOUR, a so-called modern literary product in which there is even less humour than novelty. [O. Fr. humor (Fr. humeur)--L. humor--hum[=e]re, to be moist.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  16. Every fluid substance of an organized body; - as the blood, chyle, lymph, &c. The Humours, , Chymi, Humores, differ considerably as to number and quality in the different species of organized beings; and even in the same species, according to the state of health or disease. The ancients reduced them to four; which they called cardinal humours :-the blood, phlegm, yellow bile, and atrabilis or black bile. A modern classification of the humours is given under Fluid. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  17. State of mind, mood; inclination, as in the h. for fighting; facetiousness, comicality; faculty of perceiving this; jocose imagination (less intellectual& more sympathetic than wit), whence humourless a.; out of h., displeased; good, ill, h. (temper), whence -humoured a.; cardinal hh., (hist.) four chief fluids of the body (blood, phlegm, choler, melancholy), determining person\'s physical& mental qualities: aqueous, vitreous, h., transparent fluid parts of the eye. [Anglo-French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  18. Gratify, indulge, (person, taste, temper, &c.); adapt oneself to, make concessions to. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  19. [L.] Galen and later physicians believed the human temperament to be made up of the choleric, the phlegmatic, the sanguine, and the melancholy; and the temperament of the individual to be caused by the prevalence of one or other of these humours over the others. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  20. n. [French, Latin] Moisture; especially, the moisture or fluids of animal bodies;—a vitiated or morbid animal fluid, such as often causes an eruption on the skin;—an eruptive affection of the skin; a rash;—state of mind (formerly fancied to depend on the condition of the fluids of the body); temper;—freak; whim; caprice; fancy;—petulance; peevishness;—jocularity; merriment; pleasantry;—that quality of the imagination which gives to ideas a ludicrous or grotesque turn, and evokes mirth and laughter. Cabinet Dictionary
  21. Moisture; the different kinds of moisture in man’s body; general turn or temper of mind; present disposition; grotesque imagery, jocularity, merriment; diseased or morbid disposition; petulance, peevishness; a trick; caprice, whim, predominant inclination. Complete Dictionary

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