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Definitions of morris

  1. United States suffragist in Wyoming (1814-1902) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. United States statesman who led the committee that produced the final draft of the United States Constitution (1752-1816) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. American Revolutionary leader who signed the Declaration of Independence and raised money for the Continental Army (1734-1806) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. English poet and craftsman (1834-1896) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. leader of the American Revolution who signed the Declaration of Independence and raised money for the Continental Army (1734-1806) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  6. A Moorish dance, usually performed by a single dancer, who accompanies the dance with castanets. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. A dance formerly common in England, often performed in pagenats, processions, and May games. The dancers, grotesquely dressed and ornamented, took the parts of Robin Hood, Maidmarian, and other fictious characters. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. An old game played with counters, or men, which are placed angles of a figure drawn on a board or on the ground; also, the board or ground on which the game is played. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. A marine fish having a very slender, flat, transparent body. It is now generally believed to be the young of the conger eel or some allied fish. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A lively dance; a game. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  11. An old-fashioned rustic dance in England. morrice. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. A Moorish dance; a dance in imitation of the Moors, usually performed with castanets, tambours, &c. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  13. Originally a Moorish dance; a dance performed with bells, castanets, tambours, &c.; nine-men's-morrice, a kind of play with nine holes in the ground. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  14. A dance formerly common in England, often performed in pagenats, processions, and May games. The dancers, grotesquely dressed and ornamented, took the parts of Robin Hood, Maidmarian, and other fictitious characters. dictgcide_fs
  15. An old game played with counters, or men, which are placed at the angles of a figure drawn on a board or on the ground; also, the board or ground on which the game is played. dictgcide_fs
  16. MORRICE, mor'is, MORR'IS-DANCE, n. a Moorish dance: a dance in which bells, rattles, tambours, &c. are introduced.--v.i. MORR'IS, to perform by dancing.--ns. MORR'IS-DANC'ER; MORR'IS-PIKE (Shak.), a Moorish pike.--NINE MEN'S MORRIS, an old English game in which a figure of squares, one within another, was marked out on aboard or on the turf, and eighteen pieces or stones, nine for each side, were moved alternately as at draughts--also Nine men's merils. [Sp. morisco, Moorish--Sp. moro, a Moor.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  17. M. (-dance), grotesque dance by persons in fancy costume, usu. as characters in Robin Hood legend; m. -pike (hist.), form of pike supposed to be of Moorish origin. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  18. n. [French] A dance in imitation of the Moors, performed with castanets or rattles held in the hands, by a single person;- a dance formerly common in England, usually joined with the May-day pageants and processions. Cabinet Dictionary

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