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Definitions of disarray

  1. To throw into disorder; to break the array of. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. To take off the dress of; to unrobe. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To undress; to throw into disorder. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  4. To break the array of: to throw into disorder: to strip of array or dress. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  5. To throw into disorder; undress. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  6. To undress; to throw an army into disorder. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  7. Disarraying. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8. untidiness (especially of clothing and appearance) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. Want of array or regular order; disorder; confusion. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. Confused attire; undress. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. Disordered or insufficient dress; confusion. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  12. Want of array or order: undress. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  13. Want of order; undress. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  14. Disorder; undress. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  15. Undress; confusion; disorder. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  16. Disarrayed. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.

What are the misspellings for disarray?

Usage examples for disarray

  1. It revealed the disarray of the deck- he basins, the old mahogany amputating- case with its lock plate of bone, the stained and reddened towels; and it showed the brooding and overcast faces of the men. – The After House by Mary Roberts Rinehart
  2. Peering cautiously in, she saw that the room was in disarray – The Cry at Midnight by Mildred A. Wirt
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