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Definitions of god

  1. A supernatural being conceived of as possessing divine powers or attributes; an idol; a person or thing deifled or honored to excess. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  2. The Supreme Being: the Creator and Preserver of the world: an object of worship, an idol: (B.) a ruler. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  3. GODDESS. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4. The Supreme Being; a deity; idol. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  5. The one Supreme Being; the Deity. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  6. An object of worship; divinity; an idol. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  7. The occupants of the upper gallery in a theatre. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  8. The self-existent supreme Creator and Up holder of the universe; a being conceived of and worshipped as endowed with Divine power; an idol; any person or thing deifled or too much honoured; a ruler, as representing God. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  9. The Supreme Being; the Almighty; an idol or improper object of worship. Note.-In written or printed compositions, the word God, designating the Supreme Being, begins with a capital letter, thus, God; but when an idol or false god is meant the word is wholly in small letters, thus, god. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  10. (A.S. and Dutch God; Dan. Gud; Ger. Gott), the name of the Divine Being. It is the rendering (1) of the Hebrew 'El , from a word meaning to be strong; (2) of 'Eloah_, plural _'Elohim . The singular form, Eloah , is used only in poetry. The plural form is more commonly used in all parts of the Bible, The Hebrew word Jehovah (q.v.), the only other word generally employed to denote the Supreme Being, is uniformly rendered in the Authorized Version by "LORD," printed in small capitals. The existence of God is taken for granted in the Bible. There is nowhere any argument to prove it. He who disbelieves this truth is spoken of as one devoid of understanding ( Psalms 14:1 ). The arguments generally adduced by theologians in proof of the being of God are: The a priori argument, which is the testimony afforded by reason. biblestudytools.com
  11. (A.S. and Dutch God; Dan. Gud; Ger. Gott), the name of the Divine Being. It is the rendering (1) of the Hebrew 'El , from a word meaning to be strong; (2) of 'Eloah_, plural _'Elohim . The singular form, Eloah , is used only in poetry. The plural form is more commonly used in all parts of the Bible, The Hebrew word Jehovah (q.v.), the only other word generally employed to denote the Supreme Being, is uniformly rendered in the Authorized Version by "LORD," printed in small capitals. The existence of God is taken for granted in the Bible. There is nowhere any argument to prove it. He who disbelieves this truth is spoken of as one devoid of understanding ( Psalms 14:1 ). The arguments generally adduced by theologians in proof of the being of God are: The a posteriori argument, by which we proceed logically from the facts of experience to causes. These arguments are, (a) The cosmological, by which it is proved that there must be a First Cause of all things, for every effect must have a cause. (b) The teleological, or the argument from design. We see everywhere the operations of an intelligent Cause in nature. (c) The moral argument, called also the anthropological argument, based on the moral consciousness and the history of mankind, which exhibits a moral order and purpose which can only be explained on the supposition of the existence of God. Conscience and human history testify that "verily there is a God that judgeth in the earth." The attributes of God are set forth in order by Moses in Exodus 34:6 Exodus 34:7 . (see also Deuteronomy 6:4 ; 10:17 ; Numbers 16:22 ; Exodus 15:11 ; 33:19 ; Isaiah 44:6 ; Habakkuk 3:6 ; Psalms 102:26 ; Job 34:12 .) They are also systematically classified in Revelation 5:12 and 7:12 . God's attributes are spoken of by some as absolute, i.e., such as belong to his essence as Jehovah, Jah, etc.; and relative, i.e., such as are ascribed to him with relation to his creatures. Others distinguish them into communicable, i.e., those which can be imparted in degree to his creatures: goodness, holiness, wisdom, etc.; and incommunicable, which cannot be so imparted: independence, immutability, immensity, and eternity. They are by some also divided into natural attributes, eternity, immensity, etc.; and moral, holiness, goodness, etc. These dictionary topics are fromM.G. Easton M.A., D.D., Illustrated Bible Dictionary, Third Edition,published by Thomas Nelson, 1897. Public Domain, copy freely.[N] indicates this entry was also found in Nave's Topical Bible[T] indicates this entry was also found in Torrey's Topical Textbook[B] indicates this entry was also found in Baker's Evangelical Dictionary[S] indicates this entry was also found in Smith's Bible DictionaryBibliography InformationEaston, Matthew George. "Entry for God". "Easton's Bible Dictionary". . biblestudytools.com
  12. (good ). Throughout the Hebrew Scriptures two chief names are used for the one true divine Being--ELOHIM, commonly translated God in our version, and JEHOVAH, translated Lord . Elohim is the plural of Eloah (in Arabic Allah ); it is often used in the short form EL (a word signifying strength , as in EL-SHADDAI, God Almighty, the name by which God was specially known to the patriarchs. ( Genesis 17:1 ; 28:3 ; Exodus 6:3 ) The etymology is uncertain, but it is generally agreed that the primary idea is that of strength, power of effect , and that it properly describes God in that character in which he is exhibited to all men in his works, as the creator, sustainer and supreme governor of the world. The plural form of Elohim has given rise to much discussion. The fanciful idea that it referred to the trinity of persons in the Godhead hardly finds now a supporter among scholars. It is either what grammarians call the plural of majesty , or it denotes the fullness of divine strength, the sum of the powers displayed by God. Jehovah denotes specifically the one true God, whose people the Jews were, and who made them the guardians of his truth. The name is never applied to a false god, nor to any other being except one, the ANGEL-JEHOVAH who is thereby marked as one with God, and who appears again in the New Covenant as "God manifested in the flesh." Thus much is clear; but all else is beset with difficulties. At a time too early to be traced, the Jews abstained from pronouncing the name, for fear of its irreverent use. The custom is said to have been founded on a strained interpretation of ( Leviticus 24:16 ) and the phrase there used, "THE NAME" (Shema ), is substituted by the rabbis for the unutterable word. In reading the Scriptures they substituted for it the word ADONAI (Lord ), from the translation of which by Kurios in the LXX., followed by the Vulgate, which uses Dominus , we have the LORD of our version. The substitution of the word Lord is most unhappy, for it in no way represents the meaning of the sacred name. The key to the meaning of the name is unquestionably given in Gods revelation of himself to Moses by the phrase "I AM THAT I AM," ( Exodus 3:14 ; 6:3 ) We must connect the name Jehovah with the Hebrew substantive verb to be , with the inference that it expresses the essential, eternal, unchangeable being of Jehovah. But more, it is not the expression only, or chiefly, of an absolute truth: it is a practical revelation of God, in his essential, unchangeable relation to this chosen people, the basis of his covenant. biblestudytools.com
  13. From the Saxon god, good. The source of all good; the supreme being. 1. Every man is presumed to believe in God, and he who opposes a witness on the ground of his unbelief is bound to prove it. 3 Bouv. Inst. u. 3180. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  14. Blasphemy against the Almighty, by denying his being or providence, was an offence punishable at common law by fine and imprisonment, or other infamous corporal punishment. 4 Bl. Corn. 60; 1 East, P. C. 3; 1 Russ. on Crimes, 217. This offence his been enlarged in Pennsylvania, and perhaps most of the states, by statutory provision. Vide Christianity; Blasphemy; 11 Serg. & Rawle, 394. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  15. By article 1, of amendments to the Constitution of the United States, it is provided that "Congress shall make no laws respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof." In the United States, therefore, every one is allowed to worship God according to the dictates of his own conscience. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  16. god, n. the Supreme Being: the Creator and Preserver of the world: an object of worship, an idol: (B.) a ruler:--fem. GOD'DESS: (pl.) the occupants of the gallery of a theatre.--v.t. (Shak.) to deify.--interj. GOD'-A-MER'CY (Shak.), probably a corruption of 'God have mercy!'--ns. GOD'CHILD; GOD'DAUGHTER; GOD'DESS-SHIP (Byron), state or quality of a goddess; GOD'FATHER, GOD'MOTHER, the persons who, at baptism, guarantee a child's religious education.--adjs. GOD'-FORSAK'EN, miserable, as if forsaken by God; GOD'-FEAR'ING, reverencing God.--n. GOD'HEAD, state of being a god: deity: divine nature--also rarely GOD'HOOD.--adj. GOD'LESS, living without God: impious: atheistical.--adv. GOD'LESSLY.--n. GOD'LESSNESS.--adj. GOD'LIKE, like God: divine.--ns. GODLI'NESS; GOD'LING (Dryden), a little god.--adj. GOD'LY, like God in character: pious: according to God's law.--advs. GOD'LY, GOD'LILY.--ns. GOD'LY-HEAD (Spens.), goodness; GOD'SEND, an unexpected piece of good fortune; GOD'SHIP, the rank or character of a god: a divinity; GOD'-SMITH (Dryden), a maker of idols; GOD'SON; GOD'SPEED, a wish for good speed or success.--adv. GOD'WARD, toward God.--GOD'S ACRE, a burial-ground (imitated from Ger. Gottesacker); GOD'S TRUTH, an absolute truth--an emphatic asseveration.--HOUSEHOLD GODS, among the Romans, the special gods presiding over the family: anything bound up with home interests. [A.S. god; Ger. gott, Goth. guth, Dut. god; all from a Teut. root gutha, God, and quite distinct from good.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  17. Superhuman being worshipped as having power over nature& human fortunes, deity, (usu. g-; g. of day, sun; g. of war, Mars; g. of love, blind g., Cupid; g. of wine, Bacchus; g. of this world, the Devil; Ye gg.!, Ye gg. & little fishes!, mock-heroic exclamations; feast, sight, for the gg., something exquisite &c.); image, animal, or other object, worshipped as symbolizing, being the visible habitation of, or itself possessing, divine power, an idol, (g-); adored, admired, or influential person (g-); (Theat.; pl.) occupants of gallery. Supreme being, Creator& Ruler of universe, (G-; often the Lord G., Almighty G., German Almighty; German the Father, Son, Holy Ghost, Persons of Trinity; ACT of G.; with G., dead& in heaven; God\'s truth, the absolute truth; God\'s earth, the whole earth; oh, my, good, &c., G.!, exclamations of pain, grief, or anger; German bless, damn, help, you!, him!, &c., German forbid!, grant- !, prayers or imprecations; German bless me!, my life!, my soul!, you!. &c., exclamations of surprise; German willing, if circumstances allow; under G., used to qualify attribution of full agency to man; thank G.!, parenthetic expression of pleasure at turn of events &c.; German knows, I do not know; for God\'s sake, with urgent petitions; by G., confirmatory oath; so HELP me G.!). Godfather, godmother, g.-parent, g.-papa, g.-mamma, sponsor at baptism, & so of the converse relation g.-child, godson, g.-daughter; godfather (fig.), person after whom person or thing is named, (vb) be responsible for, give one\'s name to; g.-fearing, sincerely religious; godman, Christ; God\'sacre (imit. of German), churchyard; God\'s book, bible; godsend unexpected welcome event or acquisition; God\'s image, human body; g.-speed, utterance of words German speed you!, usu. in bid person g.-s., wish him success in undertaking, journey, &c. Hence godhood, godship, nn., godward adv. & a., godwards adv. [Dutch] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  18. Deify; g. it, play the g. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  19. n. [Anglo-Saxon, German, Gothic] The Supreme Being; Jehovah;—an object of worship; a divinity;—a heathen deity; an idol;—a ruler; a judge;—an angel;—any person idolized or honoured sinfully;—any object esteemed and pursued as the chief good. Cabinet Dictionary
  20. The Supreme Being; a false god, an idol; any person or thing deified, or too much honoured. Complete Dictionary

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