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Definitions of haggard

  1. very thin especially from disease or hunger or cold; "emaciated bony hands"; "a nightmare population of gaunt men and skeletal boys"; "eyes were haggard and cavernous"; "small pinched faces"; "kept life in his wasted frame only by grim concentration" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. showing the wearing effects of overwork or care or suffering; "looking careworn as she bent over her mending"; "her face was drawn and haggard from sleeplessness"; "that raddled but still noble face"; "shocked to see the worn look of his handsome young face"- Charles Dickens Wordnet Dictionary DB
  3. British writer noted for romantic adventure novels (1856-1925) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. Wild or intractable; disposed to break away from duty; untamed; as, a haggard or refractory hawk. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. Having the expression of one wasted by want or suffering; hollow-eyed; having the features distorted or wasted, or anxious in appearance; as, haggard features, eyes. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. A young or untrained hawk or falcon. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. A fierce, intractable creature. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A hag. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. A stackyard. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. Worn and anxious in appearance; lean and hollow-eyed. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. Wild, applied to an untrained hawk. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  12. Lean: holloweyed. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  13. HAGGARDLY. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  14. Wasted by want or suffering. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  15. Worn and gaunt in appearance. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  16. Lean and hollow-eyed from age, or want, or suffering. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  17. Wild or intractable. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  18. An untrained or refractory hawk; anything haggard. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  19. Wild and rough in appearance; having sunken eyes; gaunt or lean. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  20. Anything wild or irreclaimable. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  21. hag'ard, adj. lean: hollow-eyed: wild, applied to an untrained hawk-- (arch.) HAGG'ED.--n. HAGG'ARD, a hawk.--adv. HAGG'ARDLY. [O. Fr. hagard, prob. related to haie, hedge.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  22. hag'ard, n. a stackyard. [Hay-yard.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  23. The French use the term Air hagard, Oeil hagard, 'Haggard air,' ' Haggard eye,' for a physiognomy, in which there is at once an expression of madness and terror. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  24. Wild-looking (esp. as a result of fatigue, privation, worry, &c.); (of hawk) caught in her adult plumage, untamed; (n.) such a hawk. Hence haggardness n. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  25. n. A species of hawk;—any thing wild and intractable. Cabinet Dictionary

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