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Definitions of metre

  1. (prosody) the accent in a metrical foot of verse Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. rhythm as given by division into parts of equal time Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the basic unit of length adopted under the System International d'Unites (approximately 1.094 yards) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. the basic unit of length adopted under the Systeme International d'Unites (approximately 1.094 yards) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  5. a poem. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. A measure of length, equal to 39.37 English inches, the standard of linear measure in the metric system of weights and measures. It was intended to be, and is very nearly, the ten millionth part of the distance from the equator to the north pole, as ascertained by actual measurement of an arc of a meridian. See Metric system, under Metric. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. See Meter. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  8. A regular arrangement of syllables in verse; rhythm; poetical measure; unit of length in the metric system equivalent to 39.37 inches. Also, meter. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  9. Meter. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  10. Poetical measure or arrangement of syllables: rhythm: verse: a French measure of length equal to nearly 39 1/2 inches. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  11. Metric, metrical. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  12. Poetical arrangement of syllables; verse; French measure of 39.37 inches. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  13. Rhythmical arrangement of syllables, as in poetry. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. An instrument for measuring fluids, gases, etc. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. The fundamental unit of length in the metric system; 39.37 inches. See METRIC SYSTEM. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  16. Meterage. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  17. A rhythmic arrangement of syllables in verse; a French measure of length, being the unit of the metrical system of France, and fixed at the ten-millionth part of the quadrant of the meridian and equal to 3937 English inches. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  18. In poetry, the quality of the measured tread which distinguishes poetry from prose, and the harmony of which pleases and delights the ear; the number of syllables in a verse, as a psalm or hymn. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  19. A French measure of length equal to 39.371 inches English. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  20. Rhythmical arrangement of syllables or words into verses, stanzas, strophes, etc.; poetical measure, depending on number, quantity, and accent of syllables; rhythm; measure; verse; also, any specific rhythmical arrangements; as, the Horatian meters; a dactylic meter. mso.anu.edu.au
  21. tions for legislation, and other matters. Const. U. S. art 2, thelawdictionary.org
  22. m[=e]'t[.e]r, n. that regulated succession of certain groups of syllables in which poetry is usually written--these groups of long and short (classical) or accented (English) syllables being called feet: rhythm: verse, or poetry generally: a plan of versification, the character of a stanza as consisting of a given number of lines composed of feet of a given number, construction, and accent: musical time.--adjs. MET'RIC, -AL, pertaining to metre or to metrology: consisting of verses.--adv. MET'RICALLY.--ns. METRIC'IAN, MET'RICIST, one skilled in metres, one who writes in metre; MET'RICS, the art or science of versification; METRIFIC[=A]'TION. (Tenn.), the act of making verses; MET'RIFIER, a versifier; MET'RIST, one skilled in metres, a skilful versifier; METROM[=A]'NIA, a mania for writing verses.--COMMON METRE, the stanza forming a quatrain in eights and sixes, of four and of three iambic feet alternately--also SERVICE METRE, from its use in the metrical psalms, &c., and BALLAD METRE, from its use in old romances and ballads; LONG METRE, an octosyllabic quatrain, the four lines with four feet each; SHORT METRE, the quatrain in sixes, with the third line octosyllabic. [Fr.,--L. metrum--Gr. metron.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  23. Any form of poetic rhythm, determined by character& number of feet; metrical group, esp. pair of feet in iambic& other rhythms. Hence metrician, metrics, metrist, nn. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  24. Unit of length in metric system (39-37 in.). So metric a. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  25. Same as Meter. American pocket medical dictionary.
  26. [Fr.] The fundamental unit of length in the metric system; originally designed to be the ten-millionth part of an arc of the meridian, reaching from the pole to the equator. It is, in reality, like the yard, an arbitrary distance, viz. the distance between the two ends of a certain platinum rod at the temperature of melting ice. Its length is 39.37079 inches or 1.09363 yard. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  27. n. [Anglo-Saxon, French, Latin, Greek] Rhythmical arrangement of syllables into verses, stanzas, strophes, &c. ; rhythm; measure; verse ; —a French measure of length, equal to 39.370 English inches, the standard of linear measure. Cabinet Dictionary

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