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Definitions of benefit

  1. be beneficial for; "This will do you good" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. something that aids or promotes well-being; "for the common good" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a performance to raise money for a charitable cause Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. financial assistance in time of need Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. derive benefit from Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. derive a benefit from; "She profited from his vast experience" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  7. Profit; advantage. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  8. An act of kindness; a favor conferred. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. Whatever promotes prosperity and personal happiness, or adds value to property; advantage; profit. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A theatrical performance, a concert, or the like, the proceeds of which do not go to the lessee of the theater or to the company, but to some individual actor, or to some charitable use. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. Beneficence; liberality. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Natural advantages; endowments; accomplishments. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To be beneficial to; to do good to; to advantage; to advance in health or prosperity; to be useful to; to profit. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To gain advantage; to make improvement; to profit; as, he will benefit by the change. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. An act of kindness; a favor conferred; whatever promotes the happiness and well-being of a person or thing, or adds to the value of property; a theatrical performance, the proceeds of which go to one of the actors, etc. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. To do good to; be of service to. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. To gain advantage; make improvement. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. A favor: advantage: a performance at a theatre, the proceeds of which go to one of the company. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  19. To do good to. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. To gain advantage:-pr.p. benefiting; pa.p. benefited. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. A favor; advantage. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  22. To receive good from; profit by. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  23. To be helpful or useful to; profit; improve. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. A favor bestowed; privilege. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. An act of kindness; a favour conferred; advantage; profit; a performance at a theatre, or place of entertainment, the proceeds of which go to one of the actors, some indigent deserving person, or some public institution or charity. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  26. To do good to; to advantage. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  27. To gain advantage; to make improvement. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  28. To do good to; to gain advantage from. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  29. Advantage; profit; privilege. Fitch v. Bates, 11 Barb. (N. Y.) 473; Synod of Dakota v. State, 2 S. D. 366, 50 N. W. 632, 14 L. R. A. 418; Winthrop Co. v. Clinton, 196 Pa. 472, 46 Atl. 435, 79 Am. St. Rep. 729. In the law of eminent domain, it is a rule that, in assessing damages for private property taken or injured for public use, “special benefits” may be set off against the amount of damage found, but not “general benefits.” Within the meaning of this rule, general benefits are such as accrue to the community at large to the vicinage, or to all property similarly situated with reference to the work or improvement in question; while special benefits are such as accrue directly and solely to the owner of the land in question and not to others. Little Miami R. Co. v. Collett, 6 Ohio St. 182; St. Louis, etc., Ity. Co. v. Fowler, 142 Mo. 670, 44 S. W. 771; Gray v. Manhattan Ry. Co., 16 Daly, 510, 12 N. Y. Supp. 542; Barr v. Omaha, 42 Neb. 341, 60 N. W. 591. thelawdictionary.org
  30. This word is used in the same sense as gain (q. v.) and profits. (q. v.) 20 Toull. n. 199. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  31. ben'e-fit, n. a kindness: a favour: any advantage, natural or other: a performance at a theatre, the proceeds of which go to one of the company.--v.t. to do good to.--v.i. to gain advantage (with from),--ns. BEN'EFIT-OF-CLER'GY, in old English law, the exemption of the persons of ecclesiastics from criminal process before a secular judge, they being responsible only to their ordinary. This privilege, at first limited to those in actual orders, was in 1350 extended to all manner of clerks, and in later practice to all who could read, whether of clergy or laity; BEN'EFIT-OF-IN'VENTORY (Scots law), a legal privilege whereby an heir secured himself against unlimited liability for his ancestor, by giving up within the annus deliberandi an inventory of his heritage or real estate, to the extent of which alone was the heir liable.--BENEFIT SOCIETIES, associations for mutual benefit chiefly among the labouring classes, better known as Friendly societies. [M. E. benfet, through Fr. from L. benefactum.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  32. Advantage (for the b. of, on behalf of); exemption from ordinary courts by the privilege of one\'s order (b. of CLERGY, peerage); performance at theatre, game &c., of which proceeds go to particular players (-\'s b., b.-night, b.-match); b.-club, -society, for mutual insurance against illness or age. [middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  33. Do good to; receive b. (by thing). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  34. (Also) allowance, pension, attendance, to which person is entitled under National Insurance Act or as member of benefit society &c. (maternity, medical, b.); (slang, iron.) fine time, fine job, (had no end of a b. getting things straight). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  35. n. [Latin] An act of kindness; a favour conferred;—whatever contributes to promote prosperity, happiness, or property;—a performance at a theatre or elsewhere, the proceeds of which are given to a particular person or object. Cabinet Dictionary
  36. A kindness, a favour conferred; advantage, profit, use; in law, benefit of clergy is, that a man being found guilty of such felony as this benefit is granted for, is burnt in the hand, and set free, if the ordinary's commissioner standing by, do say, Legit ut clericus. Complete Dictionary

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