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Definitions of syllable

  1. a unit of spoken language larger than a phoneme; "the word `pocket' has two syllables" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. To utter; to articulate. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  3. An elementary sound, or a combination of elementary sounds, uttered together, or with a single effort or impulse of the voice, and constituting a word or a part of a word. In other terms, it is a vowel or a diphtong, either by itself or flanked by one or more consonants, the whole produced by a single impulse or utterance. One of the liquids, l, m, n, may fill the place of a vowel in a syllable. Adjoining syllables in a word or phrase need not to be marked off by a pause, but only by such an abatement and renewal, or reenforcement, of the stress as to give the feeling of separate impulses. See Guide to Pronunciation, /275. Newage Dictionary DB
  4. In writing and printing, a part of a word, separated from the rest, and capable of being pronounced by a single impulse of the voice. It may or may not correspond to a syllable in the spoken language. Newage Dictionary DB
  5. A small part of a sentence or discourse; anything concise or short; a particle. Newage Dictionary DB
  6. To pronounce the syllables of; to utter; to articulate. Newage Dictionary DB
  7. That part of a word which can be clearly spoken by a single effort of the voice; in writing and printing, such a part of a word separated from the rest of the word. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8. Several letters taken together so as to form one sound: a word or part of a word uttered by a single effort of the voice: a small part of a sentence. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  9. Word, or part of a word, uttered by a single impulse of the voice. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  10. To utter or express in syllables. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  11. A single vocal sound forming a word, or part of a word. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. A letter or combination of letters uttered together by a single impulsion of the voice; a small part of a sentence; a particle. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  13. As much of a word as can be uttered distinctly by one effort of the voice; a word. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  14. An elementary sound, or a combination of elementary sounds, uttered together, or with a single effort or impulse of the voice, and constituting a word or a part of a word. In other terms, it is a vowel or a diphtong, either by itself or flanked by one or more consonants, the whole produced by a single impulse or utterance. One of the liquids, l, m, n, may fill the place of a vowel in a syllable. Adjoining syllables in a word or phrase need not to be marked off by a pause, but only by such an abatement and renewal, or reenforcement, of the stress as to give the feeling of separate impulses. See Guide to Pronunciation, dictgcide_fs
  15. sil'a-bl, n. several letters taken together so as to form one sound: a word or part of a word uttered by a single effort of the voice: a small part of a sentence.--v.t. to express by syllables, to utter.--n. SYLL'ABARY, a list of characters representing syllables--also SYLLAB[=A]'RIUM.--adjs. SYLLAB'IC, -AL, consisting of a syllable or syllables.--adv. SYLLAB'ICALLY.--vs.t. SYLLAB'IC[=A]TE, SYLLAB'IFY (pa.t. and pa.p. syllab'ified), to form into syllables--ns. SYLLABIC[=A]'TION, SYLLABIFIC[=A]'TION; SYLL'ABISM, syllabic character, representation of syllables. [L. syllaba--Gr. syllab[=e]--syn, with, lab-, lambanein, to take.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  16. Unit of pronunciation forming a word or part of a word& containing one vowel sound& often consonant (s) preceding or following or preceding& following this; (transf.) so much as a word, the least amount of speech, (not a s.!, do not speak); hence (-)syllabled a. (Vb) pronounce by ss., articulate distinctly; (poet.) utter (name, word). [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  17. n. [Latin, Greek] An elementary sound, or a combination of elementary sounds uttered together, or at a single effort or impulse of the voice, and constituting a word or a part of a word ;-in writing and printing, part of a word separated from the rest, and capable of being pronounced by a single impulse of the voice ;-a small part of a sentence or discourse ;-a concise part ;-a jot ; a tittle. Cabinet Dictionary

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