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Definitions of insinuate

  1. To introduce gently or slowly, as by a winding or narrow passage, or a gentle, persistent movement. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. To introduce artfully; to infuse gently; to instill. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To hint; to suggest by remote allusion; - often used derogatorily; as, did you mean to insinuate anything? Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To push or work (one's self), as into favor; to introduce by slow, gentle, or artful means; to ingratiate; - used reflexively. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To introduce gently or artfully: to hint, esp. a fault: to work into favor. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  6. To introduce artfully; hint; work into favor. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  7. To suggest indirectly; intimate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  8. To worm (oneself) in. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  9. To ingratiate one's self; to obtain access or favor by flattery or cunning. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. Work oneself into the confidence or affection of another. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. To creep or flow in: to enter gently: to obtain access by flattery or stealth. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  12. introduce or insert (oneself) in a subtle manner; "He insinuated himself into the conversation of the people at the nearby table" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. To hint. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. To work oneself into favor, etc. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. To wind in; to introduce gently or artfully; to ingratiate or work into favour; to hint or suggest by remote allusion; to instill. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  16. To wind in; to enter gently or imperceptibly; to gain on the affections by gentle or artful means. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  17. To push or work one's self into favour by gentle means; to wind in; to ingratiate, as into the affections or one's confidence; to hint, generally in a bad sense; to gain on by gentle or artful means. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  18. INSINUATOR. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  19. Insinuation. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.

What are the misspellings for insinuate?

Usage examples for insinuate

  1. He tried to insinuate himself between the horse and the fence, but the horse did not seem inclined to move. – Aladdin O'Brien by Gouverneur Morris
  2. " Again I beg of you," she said in excitement, " not to let a thought of pity for him insinuate itself in your brain- not the finest point of it! – She Buildeth Her House by Will Comfort
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