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Definitions of logic

  1. the branch of philosophy that analyzes inference Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. reasoned and reasonable judgment; "it made a certain kind of logic" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a system of reasoning Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. the principles that guide reasoning within a given field or situation; "economic logic requires it"; "by the logic of war" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. The science or art of exact reasoning, or of pure and formal thought, or of the laws according to which the processes of pure thinking should be conducted; the science of the formation and application of general notions; the science of generalization, judgment, classification, reasoning, and systematic arrangement; correct reasoning. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. A treatise on logic; as, Mill's Logic. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. The science that investigates the principles governing correct or reliable inference and deals with the canons and criteria of validity in thought and demonstration. This system of reasoning is applicable to any branch of knowledge or study. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed & Sippl, Computer Dictionary, 4th ed) Medical Dictionary DB
  8. The science of reasoning; the power to think correctly. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  9. The science and art of reasoning correctly: the science of the necessary laws of thought. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  10. The art of reasoning correctly. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  11. The science of corect and accurate reasoning. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. The science and art of reasoning, specially of inference; the science of the formal and necessary laws of thought; reasoning. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  13. The examination of that part of reasoning which depends upon the manner in which inferences are formed, and the investigations of general maxims and rules for constructing arguments, so that the conclusion may contain no inaccuracy which was not previously inserted in the premises; the science of the laws of thought, as thought; the art of using reason well in our inquiries after truth, and the communication of it to others. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  14. The science of reasoning, or of the operations of the understanding which are subservient to the estimation of evidence. The term includes both the process itself of proceeding from known truths to unknown, and all other intellectual operations, in so far as auxiliary to this. thelawdictionary.org
  15. The science or art of exact reasoning, or of pure and formal thought, or of the laws according to which the processes of pure thinking should be conducted; the science of the formation and application of general notions; the science of generalization, judgment, classification, reasoning, and systematic arrangement; the science of correct reasoning. dictgcide_fs
  16. correct reasoning; as, I can't see any logic in his argument; also, sound judgment; as, the logic of surrender was uncontestable. dictgcide_fs
  17. The path of reasoning used in any specific argument; as, his logic was irrefutable. dictgcide_fs
  18. A function of an electrical circuit (called a gate) that mimics certain elementary binary logical operations on electrical signals, such as AND, OR, or NOT; as, a logic circuit; the arithmetic and logic unit. dictgcide_fs
  19. loj'ik, n. the science and art of reasoning correctly: the science of the necessary laws of thought.--adj. LOG'ICAL, according to the rules of logic: skilled in logic: discriminating.--ns. LOGICAL'ITY, LOG'ICALNESS.--adv. LOG'ICALLY.--n. LOGIC'IAN, one skilled in logic.--v.i. LOG'ICISE, to argue.--CHOP LOGIC (see CHOP); DEDUCTIVE LOGIC, logic independent of probability or quantitative considerations; FORMAL LOGIC, logic regarded as a distinct science, independent of matters of fact; INDUCTIVE LOGIC, the logic of scientific reasoning; MATERIAL LOGIC, logic which takes into account natural fact or phenomena, as distinct from formal logic; NATURAL LOGIC, the natural faculty of distinguishing the true from the false: the logical doctrine applicable to natural things as opposed to the logic of faith; PURE LOGIC, the general laws of thought. [Gr. logik[=e], from logos, speech.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  20. Science of reasoning, proof, thinking, or inference; particular scheme of or treatise on this; chain of reasoning, correct or incorrect use of argument, ability in argument, arguments (chop l.), (argues with great learning& l.; is not governed by l.); (with purposely perverted sense) converting power, compulsion, (the l. of events, facts, necessity, grapeshot, war, &c.). So logician n. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  21. n. [Latin] The science of pure and formal thought, or of the laws according to which the process of pure thinking should be conducted. Cabinet Dictionary

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