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Definitions of meridian

  1. an imaginary great circle on the surface of the earth passing through the north and south poles at right angles to the equator; "all points on the same meridian have the same longitude" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. Highest point reached by a heavenly body; highest point, as of success, prosperty, and the like; an imaginary circle around the earth in a north and south direction, passing through the poles. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  3. Mid-day: the highest point, as of success: an imaginary circle on the earth's surface passing through the poles and any given place: (astr.) an imaginary circle, passing through the poles of the heavens, and the zenith of the spectator, which the sun crosses at mid-day. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4. Noon; highest point; great circle passing through the poles. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  5. Pertaining to noon or a meridian. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  6. A great circle supposed to be drawn so as to pass through the poles of the earth, and the zenith and nadir of any given place, intersecting the equator at right angles, and dividing the hemisphere into eastern and western; midday; roon; the highest point. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  7. In geog., an imaginary great circle on the surface of the earth, supposed to pass through the poles and any given place, cutting the equator at right angles; in astron., a great circle of the sphere passing through the poles of the heavens and the zenith of the spectator which is crossed at mid-day; the brass ring surrounding a globe on which the degrees are marked-meridians are so called because they mark all places that have noon at the same instant; mid-day or noon; the highest point of anything. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  8. Being at, or pertaining to, midday; belonging to, or passing through, the highest point attained by the sun in his diurnal course. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. Pertaining to the highest point or culmination; as, meridian splendor. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. Midday; noon. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. Hence: The highest point, as of success, prosperity, or the like; culmination. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. A great circle of the sphere passing through the poles of the heavens and the zenith of a given place. It is crossed by the sun at midday. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. A great circle on the surface of the earth, passing through the poles and any given place; also, the half of such a circle included between the poles. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Meridional. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. Pertaining to mid-day: being on the meridian or at mid-day: raised to the highest point. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  16. Pertaining to the meridian; highest; brightest; noonday. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  17. Pertaining to the meridian or at mid-day or to the highest point, or to the magnetic meridian. Magnetic meridian, a great circle, parallel with the direction of the magnetic needle, and passing through its poles. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  18. Being on the meridian or at mid-day; pert. to the highest point. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

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Usage examples for meridian

  1. As I could not abide these antics, I thanked him abruptly, pulled my still- trembling horse another way, and thought I would seek some other adventure, or perhaps go home; for during my wild gallop the sun had passed his meridian and was now declining westward. – Famous Stories Every Child Should Know by Various
  2. She was an eye- witness to her conduct during the most brilliant and luxurious portion of her reign; she saw her from the meridian of her magnificence down to her dejection to the depths of unparalleled misery. – The Memoirs of Louis XV. and XVI., Volume 7 Being Secret Memoirs of Madame du Hausset, Lady's Maid to Madame de Pompadour, and of an Unknown English Girl and The Princess Lamballe by Madame du Hausset, and of an Unknown English Girl and the Princess Lamballe
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