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Correct spelling for DSEASE

We think the word dsease is a misspelling. It could be just an incorrect spelling of the words which are suggested below. Review the list and pick the word which you think is the most suitable. For your convenience, we put a definition below each word.

Possible correct spellings for dsease

  • Cease
  • Put an end to a state or an activity; "quit teasing your little brother".

  • Dace
  • Small european freshwater fish with a slender bluish-green body.

  • Danseuse
  • A female ballet dancer.

  • Daze
  • Overcome esp. with astonishment or disbelief; "the news stunned her".

  • Debase
  • Corrupt, debase, or make impure by adding a foreign or inferior substance; often by replacing valuable ingredients with inferior ones; "adulterate liquor".

  • Decease
  • The event of dying or departure from life; "her death came as a terrible shock"; "upon your decease the capital will pass to your grandchildren".

  • Deceased
  • (euphemistic) "he is deceased"; "our dear departed friend".

  • Degas
  • Remove gas from.

  • Dense
  • So lacking in interest as to cause mental weariness; "a boring evening with uninteresting people"; "the deadening effect of some routine tasks"; "a dull play"; "his competent but dull performance"; "a ho-hum speaker who couldn't capture their attention"; "what an irksome task the writing of long letters is"- edmund burke; "tedious days on the train"; "the tiresome chirping of a cricket"- mark twain; "other people's dreams are dreadfully wearisome".

  • Desist
  • Choose to refrain; "i abstain from alcohol".

  • Despise
  • Look down on with disdain; "he despises the people he has to work for"; "the professor scorns the students who don't catch on immediately".

  • Dias
  • Portuguese explorer who in 1488 was the first european to get round the cape of good hope (thus establishing a sea route from the atlantic to asia) (1450-1500).

  • Diocese
  • The territorial jurisdiction of a bishop.

  • Disease
  • An impairment of health or a condition of abnormal functioning.

  • Diseased
  • Caused by or altered by or manifesting disease or pathology; "diseased tonsils"; "a morbid growth"; "pathologic tissue"; "pathological bodily processes".

  • Disperse
  • Cause to separate; "break up kidney stones"; "disperse particles".

  • Disuse
  • The state of something that has been unused and neglected; "the house was in a terrible state of neglect".

  • Dose
  • The quantity of an active agent (substance or radiation) taken in or absorbed at any one time.

  • Duse
  • Italian actress best known for her performances in tragic roles (1858-1924).

  • Sass
  • An impudent or insolent rejoinder; "don't give me any of your sass".

  • Seats
  • An area that includes seats for several people; "there is seating for 40 students in this classroom".

  • Tease
  • Someone given to teasing (as by mocking or stirring curiosity).

  • Teaser
  • Someone given to teasing (as by mocking or stirring curiosity).

  • Tsetse
  • Blood-sucking african fly; transmits sleeping sickness etc..

  • Diastase
  • A soluble, nitrogenous ferment, capable of converting starch and dextrin into sugar..

  • Dies
  • Of or pertaining to dying or death; as, dying bed; dying day; dying words; also, simulating a dying state..

  • Does
  • The 3d pers. sing. pres. of do..

  • Diseases
  • A definite pathologic process with a characteristic set of signs and symptoms. it may affect the whole body or any of its parts, and its etiology, pathology, and prognosis may be known or unknown..

  • Dues
  • Certain taxes, rates, or payments..

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