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Definitions of pinch

  1. make off with belongings of others Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the act of apprehending (especially apprehending a criminal); "the policeman on the beat got credit for the collar" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. make ridges into by pinching together Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a sudden unforeseen crisis (usually involving danger) that requires immediate action; "he never knew what to do in an emergency" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a slight but appreciable addition; "this dish could use a touch of garlic" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. squeeze tightly between the fingers; "He pinched her behind"; "She squeezed the bottle" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. small sharp biting Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a squeeze with the fingers Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. an injury resulting from getting some body part squeezed Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a painful or straitened circumstance; "the pinch of the recession" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. irritate as if by a nip, pinch, or tear; "smooth surfaces can vellicate the teeth"; "the pain is as if sharp points pinch your back" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. cut the top off; "top trees and bushes" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. To seize by way of theft; to steal; also, to catch; to arrest. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To press hard or squeeze between the ends of the fingers, between teeth or claws, or between the jaws of an instrument; to squeeze or compress, as between any two hard bodies. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To plait. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  16. Figuratively: To cramp; to straiten; to oppress; to starve; to distress; as, to be pinched for money. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To move, as a railroad car, by prying the wheels with a pinch. See Pinch, n., 4. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To act with pressing force; to compress; to squeeze; as, the shoe pinches. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To take hold; to grip, as a dog does. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To spare; to be niggardly; to be covetous. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. A close compression, as with the ends of the fingers, or with an instrument; a nip. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. As much as may be taken between the finger and thumb; any very small quantity; as, a pinch of snuff. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Pian; pang. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. o seize; to grip; to bite; - said of animals. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. A lever having a projection at one end, acting as a fulcrum, - used chiefly to roll heavy wheels, etc. Called also pinch bar. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To squeeze or nip between two hard edges; to press on so as to hurt; oppress or distress; make thin or wan; as, to be pinched with hunger. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. To press hard; as, my shoe pinches; be mean or miserly. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. A squeeze or nip, as with the fingers and thumb; painful pressure; as, the pinch of poverty; a sudden difficulty or necessity; as, to do it at a pinch; as much as can be held between the thumb and finger; as, a pinch of salt. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  29. To gripe hard: to squeeze: to squeeze the flesh so as to give pain: to nip: to distress: to gripe. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  30. To act with force: to bear or press hard: to live sparingly. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  31. A close compression with the fingers: what can be taken up by the compressed fingers: a gripe: distress: oppression. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  32. A nip; squeeze. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  33. To squeeze; nip; gripe. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  34. To squeeze; nip; bind; treat stingily. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. The act of pinching; painful pressure; emergency. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. So much as can be taken between the finger and thumb. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. A painful compression with the ends of the fingers; that which is taken between the fingers and thumb; a gripe; distress inflicted or suffered; straits. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  38. To press hard or squeeze; to nip; to gripe; to straiten; to oppress with want; to distress; to press; to press hard. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. To act with pressing force; to hear hard; to be straitened. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. A sharp and painful gripe by the ends of the fingers or by pincers, &c.; the mark or pain occasioned by it; the small quantity that can be held between the thumb and forefinger; pressure; oppression; distress through want. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  41. To gripe or squeeze between the thumb and a finger; to squeeze or press between any two sharp edges or points so as to pain; to distress; to press hard or bear hard upon, as want; to act with a force to be felt; to spare; to be frugal. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  42. o seize; to grip; to bite; -- said of animals. mso.anu.edu.au
  43. A lever having a projection at one end, acting as a fulcrum, -- used chiefly to roll heavy wheels, etc. Called also pinch bar. mso.anu.edu.au
  44. pinsh, v.t. to grip hard: to squeeze between two hard or firm substances: to squeeze the flesh so as to give pain: to nip: to distress: to gripe.--v.i. to act with force: to bear or press hard: to live sparingly.--n. a close compression with the fingers: what can be taken up between the finger and thumb: an iron bar used as a lever for lifting weights, rolling wheels, &c.: a gripe: distress: oppression.--n. PINCH'COMMONS, a niggard, a miser.--adj. PINCHED, having the appearance of being tightly squeezed: hard pressed by want or cold: narrowed in size.--ns. PINCH'ER, one who, or that which, pinches; PINCH'ERS, PIN'CERS, an instrument for gripping anything firmly, esp. for drawing out nails, &c.; PINCH'FIST, PINCH'GUT PINCH'PENNY, a niggard.--adv. PINCH'INGLY, in a pinching manner.--AT A PINCH, in a case of necessity; KNOW WHERE THE SHOE PINCHES, to know where the cause of trouble or difficulty is. [O. Fr. pincer; prob. Teut., cf. Dut. pitsen, to pinch.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  45. Nip, squeeze; (fig.) stress (of poverty &c.); at a p. (critical juncture); as much as can be taken up with tips of finger& thumb, as a p. of snuff, salt. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  46. Nip, squeeze, esp. between tips of finger& thumb (also fig. of cold, hunger, &c.); that is where the shoe pinches, that is the difficulty or trouble; extort (money &c. from, out of, person &c.); stint (person &c. in, of, for, food &c.); be niggardly; urge (horse esp. in race); sail (ship) close-hauled; (slang) steal (thing), rob (person), arrest, take into custody. [old Northern French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  47. n. A close compression with the ends of the fingers; also, that which is taken between the ends of the fingers;—a gripe; a pang;—straits; difficulty; time of distress;—pressure; oppression;—a lever having a projection acting as a fulcrum near one end, used chiefly to roll heavy wheels—called also pinch-bar. Cabinet Dictionary

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