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Definitions of bandage

  1. wrap around with something so as to cover or enclose Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a piece of soft material that protects an injured part of the body Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. dress by covering or binding; "The nurse bandaged a sprained ankle"; "bandage an incision" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a piece of soft material that covers and protects an injured part of the body Wordnet Dictionary DB
  5. A fillet or strip of woven material, used in dressing and binding up wounds, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. Something resembling a bandage; that which is bound over or round something to cover, strengthen, or compress it; a ligature. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To bind, dress, or cover, with a bandage; as, to bandage the eyes. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. Material used for wrapping or binding any part of the body. Medical Dictionary DB
  9. A strip of cotton or other material used in dressing wounds, etc. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. To dress or bind with a strip of any soft material. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. A piece of cloth or other material, of varying shape and size, applied to a limb or other part of the body, to make compression, prevent motion, retain surgical dressings, etc. See also cuts under Barton, Scultetus, and Velpeau. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  12. A strip of cloth used to bind up a wound or fracture. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  13. To bind with such. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  14. A strip of cloth used for binding. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  15. To bind with a bandage. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  16. To put a bandage on. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  17. A strip, as of soft cloth, used in dressing wounds, etc.; any band. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  18. A fillet or swath used in dressing and binding up wounds, &c.; that which is bound over something else. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  19. A fillet; a swath; a long narrow strip of cloth used in binding up a wound or an infirmity. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  20. To tie up with astrip of cloth; to dress with a bandage. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  21. This word, with the French, is generally used to express the methodical application of rollers, compresses, &c., Bandaging, Syndesis, to fix an apparatus upon any part,-corresponding to the words deligatio, fasciatio, fasciarum applicatio, epidssis. With us the noun is usually applied to the result of the application, or to the bandage itself ;-a sense in which the French employ the word Bande. Bandages are simple or compound. The simple bandage is equal, if the turns are applied circularly above each other; unequal, if the turns are not accurately applied upon each other. If each turn of the bandage be only covered one-third, it forms the doloire of the French; if the edges touch only slightly, it is the mousse; if the turns are very oblique and separated, it is the spiral or creeping, (F.) rampant; if folded upon each other, it is termed the reversed, (F.) renverse. By uniting various kinds of bandaging, we have the compound; and these compound bandages have received various names expressive of their figure, or of the parts to which they are applied, as capistrum, spica, &c. Bandages are divided, also, as regards their uses, into uniting, dividing, retaining, expelling, compressing. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  22. It may be made of linen, flannel, or other stuff capable of offering a certain resistance. The two extremities of a bandage are called tails, (F.) chefs, and the rolled part is termed its head, (F.) globe. If rolled at both extremities, it is called a double-headed roller or bandage, (F.) bande a deux globes. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  23. Strip of material for binding up limb, wound, &c., or anything used for blindfolding; (vb) tie up with b., whence bandaging (3) n. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  24. A piece or strip of gauze or other fabric for wrapping any part or member. American pocket medical dictionary.
  25. An appliance consisting wholly or in great part of muslin, linen, flannel, or other analogous fabric, employed for restraining, suspending, supporting, or compressing a part, or for retaining other applications in position. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  26. n. A fillet, roller, or swath, used in dressing and binding up wounds, &c. Cabinet Dictionary
  27. Something bound over another; the fillet or roller wrapped over a wounded member. Complete Dictionary

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