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Definitions of burlesque

  1. To ridicule or make ridiculous by caricatured representation. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  2. To represent ludicrously; caricature. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To ridicule, or to make ludicrous by grotesque representation in action or in language. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To turn into burlesque: to ridicule. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  5. To employ burlesque. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To turn to ridicule. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  7. To turn a subject into ridicule; to treat a trifling matter with mock gravity to excite laughter. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  8. a composition that imitates somebody's style in a humorous way Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a theatrical entertainment of broad and earthy humor; consists of comic skits and short turns (and sometimes striptease) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. Ludicrous representation; exaggerated parody; grotesque satire. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. An ironical or satirical composition intended to excite laughter, or to ridicule anything. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. A ludicrous imitation; a caricature; a travesty; a gross perversion. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. A jesting or ridiculing: a ludicrous representation. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  14. The treatment of a ridiculous subject with mocksolemnity; a ridiculous representation. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  15. Ludicrous representation; caricature. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  16. A ludicrous representation of contrast; a composition in which the contrast between the subject and the manner of considering it renders it ludicrous, as when the trifling is treated seriously, or the serious, or rather mock serious, with levity. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  17. The turning any matter into ridicule; the representation of a subject in mock gravity with the view of exciting laughter. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  18. Tending to excite laughter or contempt by extravagant images, or by a contrast between the subject and the manner of treating it, as when a trifling subject is treated with mock gravity; jocular; ironical. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Tending to excite laughter by exaggerating the peculiarities or prominent features. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. Jocular: comical. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. Marked by ludicrous incongruity. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. Tending to excite laughter by burlesque. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  23. Tending to raise laughter; droll; comic. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

Usage examples for burlesque

  1. This feature of Schiller's plot, which has for us something of the burlesque about it, has been taken more than any other to prove his inexperience of life. – The Life and Works of Friedrich Schiller by Calvin Thomas
  2. I was duly grateful as Mr. Bishop had told me a lot about burlesque during the afternoon. – Terribly Intimate Portraits by Noël Coward
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