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Definitions of chine

  1. Too chamfer the ends of a stave and form the chine.. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. cut through the backbone of an animal Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. To cut through the backbone, or into chine-pieces. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  4. To cut into chine pieces. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  5. cut of meat or fish including at least part of the backbone Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. A chink or cleft; a narrow and deep ravine; as, Shanklin Chine in the Isle of Wight, a quarter of a mile long and 230 feet deep. Newage Dictionary DB
  7. The backbone or spine of an animal; the back. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A piece of the backbone of an animal, with the adjoining parts, cut for cooking. [See Illust. of Beef.] Webster Dictionary DB
  9. The edge or rim of a cask, etc., formed by the projecting ends of the staves; the chamfered end of a stave. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A chink or cleft; a narrow and deep ravine; as, Shanklin in the Isle of Wight, a quarter of a mile long and 230 feet deep. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. The Chinchilla backbone or spine of an animal; a piece of the backbone of an animal with adjoining parts. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  12. The spine or backbone, from its thorn-like form: a piece of the backbone of a beast and adjoining parts for cooking. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  13. The spine or backbone. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  14. The back bone or back. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. The backbone or spine of an animal; a piece of the back of an animal, properly of a pig, cut for cooking; the chime of a cask. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  16. The back-bone of an animal; a piece of the back-bone, with adjacent parts, cut from an animal for cooking; part of the water-way of a ship. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

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Usage examples for chine

  1. He has a broad snout, short head, eyes bright and fiery, very small fine pink ears, wide cheeks, high chine with a neck of such immense thickness, that when the animal is fat it looks like an elongated carcase,- a mass of fat, without shape or form, like a feather pillow. – The Book of Household Management by Mrs. Isabella Beeton
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