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Definitions of fracture

  1. (geology) a crack in the earth's crust resulting from the displacement of one side with respect to the other; "they built it right over a geological fault" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the act of cracking something Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. interrupt, break, or destroy; "fracture the balance of power" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. breaking of hard tissue such as bone; "it was a nasty fracture"; "the break seems to have been caused by a fall" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. fracture a bone of; "I broke my foot while playing hockey" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. break, as of a bone; "She broke her clavicle" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. become fractured; "The tibia fractured from the blow of the iron pipe" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. violate or abuse; "This writer really fractures the language" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. break into pieces; "The pothole fractured a bolt on the axle" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. break (a bone); "She broke her clavicle" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  11. To break. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. The act of breaking or snapping asunder; rupture; breach. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. The texture of a freshly broken surface; as, a compact fracture; an even, hackly, or conchoidal fracture. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To cause a fracture or fractures in; to break; to burst asunder; to crack; to separate the continuous parts of; as, to fracture a bone; to fracture the skull. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. Breaks in bones or cartilage. (Stedman, 25th ed) Medical Dictionary DB
  16. A part broken; a break caused by violence; separation; the direction in which a mineral breaks so as to show its texture. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. To break or crack, as a bone, etc. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. 1. To break. 2. A break, especially the breaking of a bone or cartilage. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  19. Breaking of a bone. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  20. A breakage; a breach in a body, especially caused by violence; a rupture of a solid body: in surg. the breaking of a bone; a fracture is simple or compound-simple when the bone only is divided; compound when the bone is broken, with a laceration of the integuments; a fracture is termed transverse, longitudinal, or oblique, according to its direction in regard to the axis of the bone: in mineral, the manner in which a mineral breaks, and by which its texture is displayed; the broken surface; as, a compact fracture; a firous fracture; foliated, striated, or conchoidal fracture, etc. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. To break: to burst asunder: to crack: to separate the continuous parts of: as, to fracture a bone, to fracture the skull. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. Act of breaking; breach. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  23. The act of breaking; a break. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. To break; to crack. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  25. A breaking of any body, especially a breach caused by violence; a rupture of a solid body; the breaking of a bone, called simple when the bone merely is divided, compound when it is broken and the integuments are lacerated; the manner in which a mineral breaks, and by which its texture is displayed; the surface, as broken. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  26. To break; to separate continuous parts. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  27. A break in any body; a break caused by violence; a broken bone. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  28. 1. Material separates into two parts. Typically caused by mechanical failure. 2. Bone breaking; many types exist, such as complete or incomplete breakage. thelawdictionary.org
  29. A solution of continuity in a bone, Osteoclasis. A simple fracture is when the bone only is divided. A compound frature is a division of the bone with a wound of the integuments communicating with the bone,- the bone, indeed, generally protruding. In addition to the injury done to the bone, a lesion of some considerable vessel, nervous trunk, &c. Fractures are also termed transverse, oblique, &c, according to their direction. The treatment of fractures consists, in general, in reducing the fragments when displaced; maintaining them when reduced; preventing the symptoms which may be likely to arise; and combating them when they occur. The reduction of fractures must be effected by extension, counter-extension, and coaptation. The parts are kept in apposition by position, rest, and an appropriate apparatus. The position must vary according to the kind of fracture. Commonly, the fractured limb is placed on a horizontal or slightly inclined plane, in a state of extension; or rather in a middle state between extension and flexion, according to the case. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  30. [Latin] The way of breaking; the appearance indicative of the way in which anything breaks. F. is called Resinous, Vitreous, Fibrous, or Conchoidal according as the surface exposed by breaking looks like resin, or glass, or appears fibrous, or has wavy depressions and elevations like a bivalve shell. na
  31. Breaking, breakage, esp. of bone or cartilage (COMPOUND f.); surface shown by mineral when broken with hammer; substitution of diphthong, diphthong substituted, for simple vowel owing to influence of following consonant; (vb) cause f. in, break continuity of, crack (t. & i.). [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  32. The breaking of a bone. American pocket medical dictionary.
  33. A solution of continuity of one or more bones. A fracture is termed transverse, longitudinal, or oblique, according to the direction of the break to the long axis of the bone. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  34. n. [Latin] Act of breaking or snapping asunder; rupture; breach;—the breaking of a bone;—the appearance of a freshly-broken mineral; or the mode in which it breaks, by which its texture is displayed. Cabinet Dictionary
  35. Breach, separation of continuous parts; the breaking of a bone. Complete Dictionary

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