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Definitions of mine

  1. get from the earth; of ores and metals Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. explosive device that explodes on contact; designed to destroy vehicles or ships or to kill or maim personnel Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. excavation in the earth from which ores and minerals are extracted Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. lay mines; "The Vietnamese mined Cambodia" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. get from the earth by excavation; "mine ores and metals" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  6. See Mien. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To dig a mine or pit in the earth; to get ore, metals, coal, or precious stones, out of the earth; to dig in the earth for minerals; to dig a passage or cavity under anything in order to overthrow it by explosives or otherwise. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To form subterraneous tunnel or hole; to form a burrow or lodge in the earth; as, the mining cony. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To dig away, or otherwise remove, the substratum or foundation of; to lay a mine under; to sap; to undermine; hence, to ruin or destroy by slow degrees or secret means. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To dig into, for ore or metal. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To get, as metals, out of the earth by digging. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. A subterranean cavity or passage Webster Dictionary DB
  13. A cavity or tunnel made under a fortification or other work, for the purpose of blowing up the superstructure with some explosive agent. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Any place where ore, metals, or precious stones are got by digging or washing the soil; as, a placer mine. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. Fig.: A rich source of wealth or other good. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To undermine. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  17. Belonging to me; my. Used as a pronominal to me; my. Used as a pronominal adjective in the predicate; as, Vengeance is mine; I will repay. Rom. xii. 19. Also, in the old style, used attributively, instead of my, before a noun beginning with a vowel. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A pit or excavation in the earth, from which metallic ores, precious stones, coal, or other mineral substances are taken by digging; - distinguished from the pits from which stones for architectural purposes are taken, and which are called quarries. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Pertaining to me. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. An opening made in the earth, from which minerals, precious stones, etc., are taken; crude iron-stone; an abundant store; a rich source of wealth; a tunnel under an enemy's works to blow them up; a receptacle filled with explosives, moored beneath, or on, the water, the firing of which destroys or hinders an enemy. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. To carry on the work of digging for metals, etc.; to dig a mine; to burrow; practice secret methods; to lay explosives (in a harbor). The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  22. To undermine or sap, as an enemy's works; to destroy slowly; to dig in for ore or metals; to make or get by digging underground; as, to mine a tunnel, or to mine coal. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. Belonging to me: my. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  24. To dig for metals: to excavate: to dig underground in order to overturn a wall: to destroy by secret means. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  25. A place from which metals are dug: an excavation dug under a fortification to blow it up with gunpowder: a rich source of wealth. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  26. Place where minerals are dug; excavation. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  27. To a mine; excavate. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  28. To dig a mine under; sap. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  29. To dig out of the earth. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. To make by digging. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. To make a mine; engage in mining; burrow. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  32. Miner. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. An excavation for digging out ore, coal, or the like, or a deposit of such material. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. An explosive charge or the cavity containing it. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. Belonging to me; of me: possessive of I. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. Possessive case of I, belonging tome. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  37. An excavation in the earth, out of which minerals are dug; crude ore or iron stone; a subterraneous passage dug under a fortification to blow it up; a rich source of wealth or other worth. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  38. To sap; to undermine. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. To dig a mine in the earth; to practise secret means of injury. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. The possessive case of the pronoun of the first person; belonging to me; my; that which belongs to me; in Scrip, language and in old style, mine is put before a noun beginning with a vowel, as, mine iniquity. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  41. A pit or excavation in the earth from which ores are dug; any rich source of wealth or good; an excavation filled with gunpowder for the purpose of blasting rocks, or in war, for blowing up an enemy's works. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  42. To sap; to form mines under; to excavate. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  43. A tunnel or gallery constructed by an insect. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.
  44. [Latin] A tunnel or gallery constructed by an insect (zool.). na
  45. A pit or excavation in the earth, from which metallic ores, precious stones, coal, or other mineral substances are taken by digging; -- distinguished from the pits from which stones for architectural purposes are taken, and which are called quarries. mso.anu.edu.au
  46. The process of mining is described in Job 28:1-11 . Moses speaks of the mineral wealth of Palestine ( Deuteronomy 8:9 ). Job 28:4 is rightly thus rendered in the Revised Version, "He breaketh open a shaft away from where men sojourn; they are forgotten of the foot [that passeth by]; they hang afar from men, they swing to and fro." These words illustrate ancient mining operations. biblestudytools.com
  47. A pit or excavation In the earth, from which metallic ores or other mineral substances are taken by digging. Webster; Marvel v. Merritt, 110 U. S. 11, 6 Sup. Ct. 207, 29 L. Ed. 550; Murray v. Allred, 100 Tenn. 100, 43 S. W. 355, 39 L. R. A. 249, 60 Am. St Rep. 740. thelawdictionary.org
  48. Belonging to me; my. Used as a pronominal to me; my. Used as a pronominal adjective in the predicate; as, mine; I will repay.Rom. xii. 19. Also, in the old style, used attributively, instead of my, before a noun beginning with a vowel. dictgcide_fs
  49. A rich source of wealth or other good. dictgcide_fs
  50. An explosive device placed concealed in a location, on land or at sea, where an enemy vehicle or enemy personnel may pass through, having a triggering mechanism which detects people or vehicles, and which will explode and kill or maim personnel or destroy or damage vehicles. A mine placed at sea (formerly called a torpedo, see torpedo{2} (a)) is also called an marine mine and underwater mine and sometimes called a floating mine, even though it may be anchored to the floor of the sea and not actually float freely. A mine placed on land (formerly called a torpedo, see torpedo{3}), usually buried, is called a land mine. dictgcide_fs
  51. m[=i]n, adj. pron. belonging to me: my. [A.S. mín; Ger. mein.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  52. m[=i]n, v.i. and v.t. to dig for metals: to excavate: to dig under a wall or building in order to overturn it: to ruin or destroy by secret means.--n. a place from which metals are dug: an excavation dug under a fortification to blow it up with gunpowder: a rich source of wealth.--ns. MINE'-CAP'TAIN, the overseer of a mine; M[=I]'NER, one who digs in a mine.--adj. M[=I]'NY, rich in mines: like a mine.--See also SUBMARINE MINE. [Low L. min[=a]re, to lead, open a mine.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  53. Excavation in earth for metal, coal, salt, &c.; (flg.) abundant source (of information &c.); iron ore; (Mil.) subterranean gallery in which gunpowder is placed to blow up fortifications, (formerly) subterranean passage under wall of besieged fortress; (Nav.) receptacle filled with dynamite& sunk esp. at entrance to harbour. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  54. Burrow in (earth); make (hole) underground; make subterranean passages under; (flg.) undermine; (Mil., Nav.) lay mines under; obtain (metal &c.) from mine; dig in (earth &c.) for ore &c. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  55. poss. pron. & a. corresponding in pred. & elliptical uses to MY, as it is m., I have lost m.; also used (archaic, poet.) before noun beginning with vowel or h, as m. eyes. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  56. m.-layer, -sweeper, ship used for laying mm., for clearing away the enemy\'s mm. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  57. n. [French, Italian] A subterranean cavity or passage, especially, a pit or excavation in the earth from which mineral substances are dug;— a cavity filled with powder formed under a fortification or other work, so as to destroy it when fired;—a rich source of wealth or other good. Cabinet Dictionary

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