Spellcheck.net

Definitions of pore

  1. focus one's attention on something; "Please focus on your studies and not on your hobbies" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. any small opening in the skin or outer surface of an animal Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. any tiny hole admitting passage of a liquid (fluid or gas) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a minute epidermal pore in a leaf or stem through which gases and water vapor can pass Wordnet Dictionary DB
  5. direct one's attention on something; "Please focus on your studies and not on your hobbies" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  6. One of the minute orifices in an animal or vegetable membrane, for transpiration, absorption, etc. Newage Dictionary DB
  7. A minute opening or passageway; an interstice between the constituent particles or molecules of a body; as, the pores of stones. Newage Dictionary DB
  8. To look or gaze steadily in reading or studying; to fix the attention; to be absorbed; -- often with on or upon, and now usually with over. Newage Dictionary DB
  9. A minute hole in the skin through which sweat passes to the surface. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. To look with close and steady attention; as, to pore over a book. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. A hole, perforation, or foramen; one of the minute openings of the sweat-glands of the skin. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  12. Minute vent or hollow tubular depression in skin. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  13. A minute passage in the skin for the perspiration: an opening between the molecules of a body. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  14. To look with steady attention on: to study closely. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  15. Minute orifice in the skin; opening between the molecules of a body. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  16. To study closely. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  17. To ponder or study closely; followed by over. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  18. A minute orifice, as in the skin. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  19. A minute orifice in the membranous surfaces of plants or animals by which fluids are exhaled or absorbed; a small interstice between the molecules or particles of bodies. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  20. To look with steady, continued attention or application. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  21. One of the very minute openings or interstices in the skin through which the perspiration or sweat passes to the surface; any minute opening or cell on the surface of an organised body. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  22. To look on steadily and minutely; to look close and long. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  23. A minute opening or interstice, as of the skin, of a stone. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.
  24. [Greek] A minute opening or interstice, as of the skin, of a stone. na
  25. p[=o]r, n. a minute passage in the skin for the perspiration: an opening between the molecules of a body.--adjs. P[=O]'RAL, of or pertaining to pores; P[=O]'RIFORM, in the form of a pore.--ns. P[=O]'RINESS, POROS'ITY, P[=O]'ROUSNESS, quality of being porous--opp. to Density.--adjs. P[=O]'ROSE, containing pores; P[=O]'ROUS, P[=O]'RY, having pores: that can be penetrated by fluid.--adv. P[=O]'ROUSLY. [Fr.,--L. porus--Gr. poros, a passage.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  26. p[=o]r, v.i. to look with steady attention on: to study closely.--n. P[=O]'RER. [Peer, to peep.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  27. Anatomists have given this name to the openings at the extremities of vessels at the surface of different membranes. EXHALANT PORES have been supposed to exist in the exhalants, to transmit the fluids exhaled. - ABSORBENT PORES are employed in taking up parts that have to enter the circulation. Pores exist in the cuticle; yet Humboldt, with a powerful magnifying-glass, was unable to observe them. The pores of the skin have also been called spira'cula. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  28. [Greek] An orifice, usually minute, upon a free surface; as P’s of the skin, the orifices of the ducts of the sweat-glands. na
  29. Minute opening (esp. in skin of animal body) through which fluids may pass. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  30. P. over, be absorbed in studying (book &c.), (fig.) meditate, think intently upon, (subject); (archaic) look intently at, on, over; p. one\'s eyes out, tire them by close reading. [middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  31. A minute orifice, as of a sweat-gland. American pocket medical dictionary.
  32. A minute aperture or passageway in a structure; especially, a fine tubular opening. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  33. n. [Latin, Greek] A minute orifice in an animal membrane, through which perspirable matter is excreted; a small spiracle;—an interstice between the constituent particles or molecules of a body. Cabinet Dictionary

What are the misspellings for pore?

X