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Definitions of revolution

  1. a single complete turn (axial or orbital); "the plane made three rotations before it crashed"; "the revolution of the earth about the sun takes one year" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the overthrow of a government by those who are governed Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a drastic and far-reaching change in ways of thinking and behaving; "the industrial revolution was also a cultural revolution" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. The act of revolving, or turning round on an axis or a center; the motion of a body round a fixed point or line; rotation; as, the revolution of a wheel, of a top, of the earth on its axis, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. Return to a point before occupied, or to a point relatively the same; a rolling back; return; as, revolution in an ellipse or spiral. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. The space measured by the regular return of a revolving body; the period made by the regular recurrence of a measure of time, or by a succession of similar events. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. The motion of any body, as a planet or satellite, in a curved line or orbit, until it returns to the same point again, or to a point relatively the same; -- designated as the annual, anomalistic, nodical, sidereal, or tropical revolution, according as the point of return or completion has a fixed relation to the year, the anomaly, the nodes, the stars, or the tropics; as, the revolution of the earth about the sun; the revolution of the moon about the earth. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. The motion of a point, line, or surface about a point or line as its center or axis, in such a manner that a moving point generates a curve, a moving line a surface (called a surface of revolution), and a moving surface a solid (called a solid of revolution); as, the revolution of a right-angled triangle about one of its sides generates a cone; the revolution of a semicircle about the diameter generates a sphere. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. A total or radical change; as, a revolution in one's circumstances or way of living. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A fundamental change in political organization, or in a government or constitution; the overthrow or renunciation of one government, and the substitution of another, by the governed. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. The motion of a body, especially a heavenly body, in a closed curve around a fixed point, or the complete turn of the body made in such a course; as, the revolution of the earth in its orbit; the motion of a body in spinning on an axis; as, the revolution of a wheel; circuit; a decided and sudden change; as, a revolution in ideas or character; the overthrow of one form of government and the setting up of another, by the people. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  12. Act of revolving: motion round a centre: course which brings to the same point or state: space measured by a revolving body: extensive change in the government of a country: a revolt. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  13. Motion round a centre; rotation; entire change in government; revolt. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  14. The act of revolving; motion around a center. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. A radical change as of government. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  16. Rotation; circular motion of a body on its axis; the motion of a body round a centre; motion returning to the same point or state; continued course, marked regular return; space marked by some revolution; change, specially in the constitution of a government. The Revolution, that which issued on the expulsion of the Stuarts from the throne of England. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  17. The motion of a body round any fixed point or centre; motion or course of anything which brings it back to the same state or point; change or alteration of system; a change in the constitution of a country; in Eng. hist. that change which placed William and Mary on the throne, A.D. 1688; That of the U. States, beginning 1775; that of France, the first or great Revolution, 1789. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  18. The motion of any body, as a planet or satellite, in a curved line or orbit, until it returns to the same point again, or to a point relatively the same; designated as the annual, anomalistic, nodical, sidereal, or tropical revolution, according as the point of return or completion has a fixed relation to the year, the anomaly, the nodes, the stars, or the tropics; as, the revolution of the earth about the sun; the revolution of the moon about the earth. dictgcide_fs
  19. rev-[=o]-l[=u]'shun, n. act of revolving: motion round a centre: course which brings to the same point or state: space measured by a revolving body: a radical change, as of one's way of living: fundamental change in the government of a country: a revolt: a complete rotation through 360°: a round of periodic changes, as the revolutions of the seasons: the winding of a spiral about its axis: change of circumstances: consideration.--adj. REVOL[=U]'TIONARY, pertaining to, or tending to, a revolution in government.--v.t. REVOL[=U]'TIONISE, to cause a revolution or entire change of anything.--ns. REVOL[=U]'TIONISM; REVOL[=U]'TIONIST, one who promotes or favours a revolution.--THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION, the change from the position of colonies to that of national independence effected by the thirteen American colonies of England in 1776; THE FRENCH REVOLUTION, the downfall of the old French monarchy and the old absolutism (1789); THE REVOLUTION, the expulsion of James II. from the throne of England (1689), and the establishment of a really constitutional government under William III. and Mary. [Revolve.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  20. Revolving, motion in orbit or circular course or round axis or centre, rotation, single completion of orbit or rotation, time it takes, cyclic recurrence; complete change, turning upside down, great reversal of conditions, fundamental reconstruction, esp. forcible substitution by subjects of new ruler or polity for the old (the R., expulsion of Stuarts 1688; French R., overthrow of monarchy 1789 &c.; American R., overthrow of British rule 1775 &c.), whence revolutionize (1, 3) v.t., revolutionism (3), revolutionist (2), nn. [Late Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  21. See Great Britain Dictionary of United States history
  22. See Stroke. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  23. n. [Latin] Act of revolving or turning round on an axis; rotation;— circular motion of a body round a fixed point or center, bringing every part of the surface or periphery back to its first place or position;— in astronomy, the motion of any body, as a planet or satellite, in a curved line or orbit until it returns to the same point again;- space measured by the motion of a revolving body in its orbit; also, time or period in which it returns to the same point or place;— continued course or time marked by the regular return of seasons, years, &c.;— any great or vital change of ideas, sentiments, &c.;— in politics, a total or radical change in the government and constitution of a country — usually implying suddenness, violence, or force, as contrasted with reform. Cabinet Dictionary
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