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Definitions of science

  1. a particular branch of scientific knowledge; "the science of genetics" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. ability to produce solutions in some problem domain; "the skill of a well-trained boxer"; "the sweet science of pugilism" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. Knowledge; knowledge of principles and causes; ascertained truth of facts. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. Accumulated and established knowledge, which has been systematized and formulated with reference to the discovery of general truths or the operation of general laws; knowledge classified and made available in work, life, or the search for truth; comprehensive, profound, or philosophical knowledge. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. Any branch or department of systematized knowledge considered as a distinct field of investigation or object of study; as, the science of astronomy, of chemistry, or of mind. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. Art, skill, or expertness, regarded as the result of knowledge of laws and principles. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To cause to become versed in science; to make skilled; to instruct. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. Especially, such knowledge when it relates to the physical world and its phenomena, the nature, constitution, and forces of matter, the qualities and functions of living tissues, etc.; - called also natural science, and physical science. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. The systematic observation of natural phenomena for the purpose of discovering laws governing those phenomena. The body of knowledge accummulated by such means. (From Dorland, 28th ed) Medical Dictionary DB
  10. Knowledge, as of general truths or particular facts, obtained and shown to be correct by accurate observation and thinking; knowledge arranged or classified with reference to general truths or laws; especially, classified knowledge in reference to the physical world; systematized knowledge of some one subject. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. Knowledge (systematized): truth ascertained: pursuit of knowledge or truth for its own sake: knowledge arranged under general truths and principles: that which refers to abstract principles, as distinguished from "art.". The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  12. Knowledge; knowledge arranged under general principles. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  13. The sum of universal knowledge. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. The system of knowledge concerning some subject or group of subjects. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. Knowledge; knowledge reduced to system; a department of knowledge so reduced. The seven terrestrial sciences, grammar, rhetoric, logic, music, astronomy, geometry, arithmetic, as studied in this order. The seven celestial sciences, civil law, Christian law, practical theology, devotional theology, dogmatic theology, mystic theology, and polemical theology, studied in this order. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  16. Acknowledged truths and laws, in any department of mind or matter, digested and arranged into a system; profound or complete knowledge; natural science, the knowledge of causes and effects, and of the laws of nature; abstract or pure science, the knowledge of powers, causes, or laws considered apart from all applications; the knowledge of reasons and their conclusions; practical science, knowledge derived from experiment and the classification of particular facts; that which depends on theory. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  17. Especially, such knowledge when it relates to the physical world and its phenomena, the nature, constitution, and forces of matter, the qualities and functions of living tissues, etc.; -- called also natural science, and physical science. mso.anu.edu.au
  18. Especially, such knowledge when it relates to the physical world and its phenomena, the nature, constitution, and forces of matter, the qualities and functions of living tissues, etc.; called also natural science, and physical science. dictgcide_fs
  19. s[=i]'ens, n. knowledge systematised: truth ascertained: pursuit of knowledge or truth for its own sake: knowledge arranged under general truths and principles: that which refers to abstract principles, as distinguished from 'art:' pre-eminent skill: trade: a department of knowledge.--n. SCIB'ILE, something capable of being known.--adjs. SC[=I]'ENCED, versed, learned; SC[=I]'ENT, knowing; SCIEN'TIAL (Milt.), producing science: skilful; SCIENTIF'IC, -AL (obs.), producing or containing science: according to, or versed in, science: used in science: systematic: accurate.--adv. SCIENTIF'ICALLY.--ns. SC[=I]'ENTISM, the view of scientists; SC[=I]'ENTIST, one who studies science, esp. natural science.--adjs. SCIENTIS'TIC.--adv. SC[=I]'ENTLY, knowingly.--n. SCIENT'OLISM, false science, superficial knowledge.--SCIENTIFIC FRONTIER, a term used by Lord Beaconsfield in 1878 in speaking of the rectification of the boundaries between India and Afghanistan, meaning a frontier capable of being occupied and defended according to the requirements of the science of strategy, in opposition to 'a hap-hazard frontier.'--ABSOLUTE SCIENCE, knowledge of things in themselves; APPLIED SCIENCE, when its laws are exemplified in dealing with concrete phenomena; DISMAL SCIENCE, political economy; GAY SCIENCE, a medieval name for belles-lettres and poetry generally, esp. amatory poetry; INDUCTIVE SCIENCE (see INDUCT); LIBERAL SCIENCE, a science cultivated from love of knowledge, without view to profit; MENTAL SCIENCE, mental philosophy, psychology; MORAL SCIENCE, ethics, the science of right and wrong, moral responsibility; OCCULT SCIENCE, a name applied to the physical sciences of the middle ages, also to magic, sorcery, witchcraft, &c.; SANITARY SCIENCE (see SANITARY); THE EXACT SCIENCES, the mathematical sciences; THE SCIENCE, the art of boxing; THE SEVEN LIBERAL SCIENCES, grammar, logic, rhetoric, arithmetic, music, geometry, and astronomy--these were the seven TERRESTRIAL SCIENCES, as opposed to the seven CELESTIAL SCIENCES, civil law, Christian law, practical theology, devotional theology, dogmatic theology, mystic theology, and polemical theology. [Fr.,--L. scientia--sciens, -entis, pr.p. of sc[=i]re, to know.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  20. Knowledge (archaic), whence (in mod. use) sciential a., scientially adv.; systematic& formulated knowledge (moral, political, natural, &c., s., such knowledge in reference to these subjects), pursuit of this or principles regulating such pursuit (man of s.); (also natural s.) the physical or natural ss. collectively (s. now shares the curriculum with literature, history, & mathematics); (with a& pl.) branch of knowledge, organized body of the knowledge that has been accumulated on a subject, (the s. of optics, ethics, philology; exact s., admitting of quantitative treatment; pure s., one depending on deductions from self-evident truths, as mathematics, logic; natural, physical, s., one dealing with material phenomena& based mainly on observation, experiment, & induction, as chemistry, biology, whence esp. scientist, scientism, nn.; the dismal s., political economy); expert\'s skill as opp. strength or natural ability, esp. in pugilism or other fighting. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  21. n. [Latin ] Knowledge ; comprehension or understanding of the truths or facts on any subject or department of inquiry;-certain knowledge; truth ascertained by observation, experiment, and induction ; the whole body of truths or facts known and believed respecting mind and matter;-systematic arrangement of the truths or facts known under classes or heads;-induction of general laws or principles from particular truths or facts statement or embodiment of the laws of mind or matter in definite terms or formulas: -theoretical knowledge, as distinguished from practical ;-knowledge of the principles and rules of invention, construction, mechanism, &c., as distinguished from art;-any art or species of knowledge, as opposed to literature, or the knowledge of the rules and modes of composition and style, as opposed to the composition itself. Cabinet Dictionary

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