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Definitions of squat

  1. To sit down upon the hams or heels; to cower, as an animal; to settle on land without title. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To crouch in a sitting posture. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To settle on a piece of land without right. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  4. To sit down on the heels, or with the knees drawn up; to settle on land with a view to gaining title to it. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  5. To sit down upon the hams or heels: to cower, as an animal: to settle on new land without title:-pr.p. squatting; pa.t. and pa.p. squatted. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  6. To sit on the hams or heels; settle on new land without title. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  7. occupy (a dwelling) illegally Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. To bruise or make flat by letting fall; to sit or cower down; to stoop or lie close to escape observation; to settle on new lands without a title. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  9. The position of one who squats. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. Squatter. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  11. A squaiting attitude. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. The posture of one who squats; a small separate vein of ore. See Squash. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  13. short and thick; as e.g. having short legs and heavy musculature; "some people seem born to be square and chunky"; "a dumpy little dumpling of a woman"; "dachshunds are long lowset dogs with drooping ears"; "a little church with a squat tower"; "a squatty red smokestack"; "a stumpy ungainly figure" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. sit on one's heels; "In some cultures, the women give birth while squatting"; "The children hunkered down to protect themselves from the sandstorm" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. The angel fish (Squatina angelus). Newage Dictionary DB
  16. To sit down upon the hams or heels; as, the savages squatted near the fire. Newage Dictionary DB
  17. To sit close to the ground; to cower; to stoop, or lie close, to escape observation, as a partridge or rabbit. Newage Dictionary DB
  18. To settle on another's land without title; also, to settle on common or public lands. Newage Dictionary DB
  19. To bruise or make flat by a fall. Newage Dictionary DB
  20. Sitting on the hams or heels; sitting close to the ground; cowering; crouching. Newage Dictionary DB
  21. Short and thick, like the figure of an animal squatting. Newage Dictionary DB
  22. The posture of one that sits on his heels or hams, or close to the ground. Newage Dictionary DB
  23. A sudden or crushing fall. Newage Dictionary DB
  24. A small vein of ore. Newage Dictionary DB
  25. A mineral consisting of tin ore and spar. Newage Dictionary DB
  26. Sitting on the heels, or with the knees drawn up; crouching; short and thick. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. Being in a squatting position. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. Sitting on the hams or heels; sitting close to the ground; cowering; short and thick, like an animal squatting. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29. Sitting on the hams or heels; sitting close to the ground; cowering; short and thick, like an animal cowering. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  30. Squatted. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.

Usage examples for squat

  1. Jerry's eyes were on a short, squat figure standing in the middle of the gateway to the Macpherson grounds. – The Reclaimers by Margaret Hill McCarter
  2. He was carrying a tray with a squat brown flask and four rather small glasses on it. – Legacy by James H Schmitz
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