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Definitions of blunder

  1. To mistake grossly; to err stupidly; to flounder about. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To err egregiously; act stupidly. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To cause to blunder. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To move in an awkward, clumsy manner; to flounder and stumble. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To make a bad mistake from stupidity, etc.; to act clumsily. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  6. To make a gross mistake, to flounder about. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  7. To make a gross mistake. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  8. To mistake grossly; to err stupidly; to act without reflection. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  9. commit a faux pas or a fault or make a serious mistake; "I blundered during the job interview" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  10. A gross error or mistake, resulting from carelessness, stupidity, or culpable ignorance. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. A gross mistake. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  12. Blunderer. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  13. A gross mistake; a stupid error. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  14. Blunderingly. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. Blundering. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.

What are the misspellings for blunder?

Usage examples for blunder

  1. She is too sensible to blunder in this matter. – Pamela Giraud by Honore de Balzac
  2. The likeness was less striking now when he looked at his niece's full face; but it was there, quite unmistakable; a sufficient excuse for the blunder he had made. – The Simpkins Plot by George A. Birmingham
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