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Definitions of crystal

  1. a solid formed by the solidification of a chemical and having a highly regular atomic structure Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a protective cover that protects the face of a watch Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. glassware made of quartz Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a crystalline element used as a component in various electronic devices Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a rock formed by the solidification of a substance; has regularly repeating internal structure; external plane faces Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. colorless glass made of almost pure silica Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. The regular form which a substance tends to assume in solidifying, through the inherent power of cohesive attraction. It is bounded by plane surfaces, symmetrically arranged, and each species of crystal has fixed axial ratios. See Crystallization. Newage Dictionary DB
  8. The material of quartz, in crystallization transparent or nearly so, and either colorless or slightly tinged with gray, or the like; -- called also rock crystal. Ornamental vessels are made of it. Cf. Smoky quartz, Pebble; also Brazilian pebble, under Brazilian. Newage Dictionary DB
  9. A species of glass, more perfect in its composition and manufacture than common glass, and often cut into ornamental forms. See Flint glass. Newage Dictionary DB
  10. The glass over the dial of a watch case. Newage Dictionary DB
  11. Anything resembling crystal, as clear water, etc. Newage Dictionary DB
  12. Consisting of, or like, crystal; clear; transparent; lucid; pellucid; crystalline. Newage Dictionary DB
  13. Clear; transparent. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  14. Transparent quartz; a body formed by a solidifying element or compound, having symmetrical plane surfaces; a glass of superior clearness; anything transparent and clear; the glass over a watch-dial. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. One of the figures of symmetrical shape assumed by certain salts and other chemical compounds. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  16. A superior kind of glass: (chem.) a piece of matter which has assumed a definite geometrical form, with plane faces. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  17. Matter which has naturally assumed a geometrical from; pure quartz; fine glass. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  18. Of, or like, crystal. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  19. Of or like crystal; clear; limpid. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  20. The solid mathematical form assumed by many minerals. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  21. Transparent quartz; flint glass; a watch-glass. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. Consisting of crystal, or like crystal. Rock crystal, transparent or colourless quartz. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  23. An inorganic body, which, by the operation of affinity, has assumed the form of a regular solid, terminated by a certain number of plane and smooth surfaces; glass of a superior composition and manufacture; anything clear as crystal. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  24. Anything congealed like ice with smooth surfaces; any natural body transparent or semi-transparent; a transparent substance made by fusing certain bodies together, as an alkali with flint or sand and lead; a fine kind of glass. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  25. Consisting of crystal; clear; transparent. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  26. the representative in the Authorized Version of two Hebrew words. 1. Zecucith occurs only in ( Job 28:17 ) where "glass" probably is intended. 2. kerach occurs in numerous passages in the Old Testament to denote "ice," "frost," etc.; but once only ( Ezekiel 1:22 ) as is generally understood, to signify "crystal." The ancients supposed rock-crystal to be merely ice congealed by intense cold. The similarity of appearance between ice and crystal caused no doubt the identity of the terms to express these substances. The Greek word occurs in ( Revelation 4:6 ; 21:1 ) It may mean either "ice" or "crystal." biblestudytools.com
  27. ( Ezekiel 1:22 , with the epithet "terrible," as dazzling the spectators with its brightness). The word occurs in Revelation 4:6 ; 21:11 ; 22:1 . It is a stone of the flint order, the most refined kind of quartz. The Greek word here used means also literally "ice." The ancients regarded the crystal as only pure water congealed into extreme hardness by great length of time. biblestudytools.com
  28. Concurrent Representation of Your Space-Time ALgorithms.A recursion equation parallel language.["A Parallel Language and its Compilation to MultiprocessorMachines or VLSI", M.C. Chen, 13th POPL, ACM 1986 pp.131-139]. foldoc_fs
  29. The material of quartz, in crystallization transparent or nearly so, and either colorless or slightly tinged with gray, or the like; called also rock crystal. Ornamental vessels are made of it. Cf. Smoky quartz, Pebble; also Brazilian pebble, under Brazilian. dictgcide_fs
  30. kris'tal, n. a superior kind of quartz, clear like ice: (chem.) a piece of matter which has assumed a definite geometrical form, with plane faces.--adjs. CRYS'TAL, CRYS'TALL[=I]NE, consisting of or like crystal in clearness, &c.; CRYS'TALFORM; CRYS'TALL[=I]SABLE, capable of being crystallised or formed into crystals.--n. CRYSTALL[=I]S[=A]'TION, the act of crystallising.--v.t. CRYS'TALL[=I]SE, to reduce to the form of a crystal.--v.i. to assume a crystalline form.--ns. CRYS'TALLITE; CRYSTALLOGEN'ESIS.--adj. CRYSTALLOGEN'IC.--n. CRYSTALLOG'RAPHER, one skilled in crystallography.--adj. CRYSTALLOGRAPH'IC--n. CRYSTALLOG'RAPHY, the science of crystallisation.--adj. CRYS'TALLOID, having the form of a crystal.--n. a name given by Graham to a class of substances which when in solution pass easily through membranes.--n. CRYS'TALLOMANCY, a mode of divination by means of transparent bodies. [O. Fr. cristol--L. crystallum--Gr. krystallos, ice--kryos, frost.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  31. A clear transparent ice-like mineral; rock-c., a for, of pure quartz; piece of this; (poet.) any clear transparent thing, esp. water; (also c.-glass) glass of very transparent quality; vessel &c. of this; (Chem., Min.) aggregation of molecules with definite internal structure& external form of solid enclosed by symmetrically arranged plane faces; (adj.) made of, like, clear as, c. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  32. c.-gazing, concentration of one\'s gaze on ball of rock crystal, pool of ink, &c., for the purpose of inducing a hallucinatory picture of future or distant events (crystal colloq., view of the future thus obtained, prophetic utterance); C. Palace, building (chiefly of iron& glass) & grounds at Sydenham used for exhibitions, concerts, &c. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  33. A naturally-produced angular solid of definite form. American pocket medical dictionary.
  34. A substance occurring in a definite geometrical form which is essentially constant for that substance, and which the latter always assumes when the conditions for its production are present. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  35. [Gr.] A solid, which may be either natural or an artificial product of chemical operations, bounded by plane surfaces and exhibiting when broken a tendency to separate along planes which either are parallel to some of the bounding planes or make given angles with them. In a crystal exhibiting double refraction, there will be one or two directions along which the refracted ray passes without division (or bifurcation); these are the Optic axes of the C. If there are two such directions, as in topaz, the crystal is Biaxial; if only one, as in Iceland spar, it is Uniaxial. Of uniaxial crystals, those are positive or attractive in which the extraordinary ray is more refracted than the ordinary ray; those are negative or repulsive in which the contrary is the case. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  36. n. [Greek] A mineral body which, by the operation of affinity, has assumed a regular geometrical form a fine kind of glass; —any thing resembling crystal. Cabinet Dictionary
  37. Crystals are hard, pellucid, and naturally colourless bodies, of regularly angular figures; Crystal is also used for a fictitious body cast in the glasshouses, called also crystal glass, which is carried to a degree of perfection beyond the common glass; Crystals, in chymistry, express salts or other matters shot or congealed in manner of crystal. Complete Dictionary
  38. Consisting of crystal; bright, clear, transparent, lucid, pellucid. Complete Dictionary

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