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Definitions of drink

  1. any liquid suitable for drinking; "may I take your beverage order?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. consume alcohol; "We were up drinking all night" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the act of drinking alcoholic beverages to excess; "drink was his downfall" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. the act of swallowing; "one swallow of the liquid was enough"; "he took a drink of his beer and smacked his lips" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. propose a toast to; "Let us toast the birthday girl!"; "Let's drink to the New Year" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a single serving of a beverage; "I asked for a hot drink"; "likes a drink before dinner" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. (informal) any large deep body of water; "he jumped into the drink and had to be rescued" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. be fascinated or spell-bound by; pay close attention to; "The mother drinks in every word of her son on the stage" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. drink excessive amounts of alcohol; be an alcoholic; "The husband drinks and beats his wife" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. any large deep body of water; "he jumped into the drink and had to be rescued" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  11. take in liquids; "The patient must drink several liters each day"; "The children like to drink soda" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. To swallow anything liquid, for quenching thirst or other purpose; to imbibe; to receive or partake of, as if in satisfaction of thirst; as, to drink from a spring. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To swallow (a liquid); to receive, as a fluid, into the stomach; to imbibe; as, to drink milk or water. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To take in (a liquid), in any manner; to suck up; to absorb; to imbibe. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To take in; to receive within one, through the senses; to inhale; to hear; to see. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To smoke, as tobacco. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Liquid to be swallowed; any fluid to be taken into the stomach for quenching thirst or for other purposes, as water, coffee, or decoctions. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. Specifically, intoxicating liquor; as, when drink is on, wit is out. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To quaff exhilarating or intoxicating liquors, in merriment or feasting; to carouse; to revel; hence, to lake alcoholic liquors to excess; to be intemperate in the se of intoxicating or spirituous liquors; to tipple. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To swallow a liquid; to take alcoholic liquors habitually. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. To swallow; to suck in; to receive through the sense; as, the eye drinks in the beauty of the scene. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  22. Any liquid swallowed to quench thirst; as much liquor as can be taken at once; strong or intoxicating liquor. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. Drinkable. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  24. Drinker, drinking. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  25. Drank. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  26. Drunk. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. Drinking. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. To swallow, as a liquid: to take in through the senses. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  29. To swallow a liquid: to take intoxicating liquors to excess:-pr.p. drinking; pa.t. drank; pa.p. drunk. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  30. Something to be drunk: intoxicating liquor. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  31. DRINKABLENESS. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  32. Something to be drunk; beverage; liquor. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  33. To swallow a liquid; take intoxicating liquors habitually. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  34. To swallow, as a liquid. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  35. To swallow, as a liquid; absorb; receive eagerly. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. Any liquid that is or may be swallowed; a beverage; a draft. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. Something to be drunk; a draught; liquor that intoxicates, or excessive indulgence in it. To drink to, to salute in drinking; to invite to drink by drinking first; to wish well to in the act of taking the cup. To drink deep, to drink to excess. To drink down, to act on by drinking; to reduce or subdue. To drink off, to drink the whole at a draught. To drink in, to absorb; to take or receive into any inlet. To drink up, to drink the whole. To drink health or to the health, a customary civility, in which a person expresses his respect or kind wishes for another. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  38. To swallow, as liquids; to imbibe; to take in by the senses; to inhale. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. To swallow a liquid; to be intemperate in the use of spirituous liquors; to be entertained with liquors at a feast. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. Any liquid taken into the mouth and stomach for quenching thirst; a beverage; a draught; a potion. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  41. To swallow a liquid, as water; to suck in; to absorb; to take alcoholic liquors; to be intemperate. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  42. The drinks of the Hebrews were water, wine, "strong drink," and vinegar. Their drinking vessels were the cup, goblet or "basin," the "cruse" or pitcher, and the saucer. To drink water by measure ( Ezekiel 4:11 ), and to buy water to drink ( Lamentations 5:4 ), denote great scarcity. To drink blood means to be satiated with slaughter. The Jews carefully strained their drinks through a sieve, through fear of violating the law of Leviticus 11:20 Leviticus 11:23 Leviticus 11:41 Leviticus 11:42 . (See Matthew 23:24 . "Strain at" should be "strain out.") biblestudytools.com
  43. dringk, v.t. to swallow, as a liquid: to empty, as a glass, bowl, &c.: to take in through the senses.--v.i. to swallow a liquid: to take intoxicating liquors to excess:--pr.p. drink'ing; pa.t. drank; pa.p. drunk.--n. something to be drunk: intoxicating liquor.--adj. DRINK'ABLE.--ns. DRINK'ABLENESS; DRINK'ER, a tippler; DRINK'-HAIL, the customary old English reply to a pledge in drinking (wæs hail, 'health or good luck to you,' was answered with drinc hail, 'drink good health or good luck'); DRINK'ING-BOUT; DRINK'ING-FOUNT'AIN; DRINK'ING-HORN; DRINK'-MON'EY, a gratuity, ostensibly given to buy liquor for drinking to the health of the giver; DRINK'-OFF'ERING, an offering of wine, oil, blood, &c. to God or the gods.--DRINK HIMSELF DRUNK, to drink until he is drunk; DRINK IN, to absorb rain, &c., as dry land does; DRINK OFF, to quaff wholly and at a gulp; DRINK THE OTHERS UNDER THE TABLE, to continue drinking and remain (comparatively) sober after the others have completely collapsed; DRINK TO, DRINK TO THE HEALTH OF, to drink wine, &c., with good wishes for one's health; DRINK UP, to exhaust by drinking.--IN DRINK, intoxicated.--STRONG DRINK, alcoholic liquor. [A.S. drincan; Ger. trinken.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  44. from Sax.Poma,Potio,Potus Beverage. (F.) Boisson. Every liquid introduced into the alimentary canal for the purpose of repairing the loss of the fluid parts of the body. The necessity for its use is indicated by the sensation of thirst. Fluid, taken during meal, aids in the digestion of the food. Some drinks are exciting and tonic, as the different varieties of beer, wine, and spirits, which we use at table. In therapeutical point of view, drinks are used to appease the thirst which prevails in febrile affections, or to act as diluents in those and other cases. The ordinary drinks, according to their chemical composition, are -1. Water, spring water, river water, well water, &c. -2. Juices and infusions of Animal and Vegetable substances, lemon juice, currant juice, whey, tea, coffee, mattee, &c, -3. Fermented Liquora, wines, ale, beer, cider, perry, -4, Spirituous Liquors, brandy, alcohol, ether, kirschwasser, rum, arack, gin, whisky, ratafias, cordials, &c. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  45. (drank; drunk& poet, drunken). Swallow (liquid); take (the waters at a spa) medicinally; d. off, up, d. the whole of at once; (of plants, porous things, &c.) absorb (moisture; often up or in); (fig.) d. in, contemplate, listen to, with delight; empty (vessel, the cup of pain or joy); spend (wages &c.) on d.; swallow liquid, take draught, (often of a source; d. deep, take large draught, or be great drinker as in next sense); take spirituous liquor esp. to excess, tipple, be a drunkard, (d. hard, heavily, like a fish; drinking-BOUT; d. oneself drunk, to death, out of a situation; d. down or under the table, outlast in retaining control of oneself while drinking); d. to, pledge, toast; wish good &c. to in drinking (d. one\'s health, d. success or confusion to). Hence (-) drinker n. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  46. Liquid swallowed or absorbed; beverage; intoxicating liquor (also strong d.), excessive indulgence in it, intemperance (on the d., giving way to this; in d., drunk); glass &c. or portion of liquor (STAND dd. round); d.-offering, libation. Hence drinkless a. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  47. n. Liquor of any kind to be swallowed. Cabinet Dictionary
  48. Liquor to be swallowed, opposed to meat; liquor of any particular kind. Complete Dictionary

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