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Definitions of oil

  1. administer an oil or ointment to ; often in a religious ceremony of blessing Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. cover with oil, as if by rubbing; "oil the wooden surface" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. oil paint used by an artist Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a slippery or viscous liquid or liquefiable substance not miscible with water Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. any of a group of liquid edible fats that are obtained from plants Wordnet Dictionary DB
  6. Any one of a great variety of unctuous combustible substances, not miscible with water; as, olive oil, whale oil, rock oil, etc. They are of animal, vegetable, or mineral origin and of varied composition, and they are variously used for food, for solvents, for anointing, lubrication, illumination, etc. By extension, any substance of an oily consistency; as, oil of vitriol. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To smear or rub over with oil; to lubricate with oil; to anoint with oil. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. An inflammable fatty liquid, insoluble in water, but soluble in ther, obtained from various animal and vegetable substances; a greenish-brown liquid found in rock or other mineral substance, and very inflammable: called also petroleum. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  9. To lubricate with oil. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. Oiler, Oiliness. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. A liquid of fatty consistence and unctuous feel, insoluble in water, soluble or not in alcohol, freely soluble in ether, and inflammable. Oils are variously classified into animal, vegetable, and mineral oils according to their source (the mineral oils, are probably of remote animal or vegetable origin); into fixed or fatty (olea pinguia) and volatile or ethereal or essential (olea volatilia, (aetherea, essentialia) oils, the former being permanent, leaving a stain on an absorbent surface, the latter evaporating when exposed to the air and being capable of distillation; and into drying and non-drying (fatty) oils, the former becoming gradually thicker when exposed to the air and finally drying to a varnish, the latter not drying but liable to become rancid on exposure. The volatile oils are of vegetable origin; the fatty oils are of both animal and vegetable origin. Many of the oils, both fixed and volatile, are employed in medicine; see oleum. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  12. A fatty fluid. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  13. The juice from the fruit of the olive-tree: any greasy liquid. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  14. To smear or anoint with oil. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  15. The unctuous juice of the olive; any liquid grease. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  16. To lubricate or anoint with oil. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  17. A greasy liquid, of vegetable or animal origin, insoluble in water. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  18. An unctuous liquid drawn from various animal and vegetable substances. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  19. To smear, lubricate, or anoint with oil. Oil of vitriol, sulphuric acid. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  20. A highly inflammable fatty liquid expressed or obtained from various animals, from many vegetable substances, and as a natural product from the earth. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  21. To smear or rub over with oil. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  22. Of the numerous substances, animal and vegetable, which were known to the ancients as yielding oil, the olive berry is the one of which most frequent mention is made in the Scriptures. 1. Gathering , --The olive berry was either gathered by hand or shaken off carefully with a light reed or stick. 2. Pressing . --In order to make oil the fruit, was either bruised in a mortar crushed in a press loaded with wood or stones, ground in a mill, or trodden with the feet. The "beaten" oil of ( Exodus 27:20 ; 29:40 ; Leviticus 24:2 ; Numbers 28:6 ) was probably made by bruising in a mortar, It was used-- (1) As food. Dried wheat, boiled with either butter or oil, but generally the former, is a common dish for all classes in Syria. ( Exodus 29:2 ) (2) Cosmetic. Oil was used by the Jews for anointing the body, e.g. after the bath, and giving to the skin and hair a smooth and comely appearance, e.g. before an entertainment. (3) Funereal. The bodies of the dead were anointed with oil. ( 2 Samuel 14:2 ) (4) Medicinal. Isaiah alludes to the use of oil in medical treatment. ( Isaiah 1:6 ) see also Mark 6:13; Jame 6:14 (5) For light. The oil for "the light" was expressly ordered to be olive oil, beaten. ( Matthew 25:3 ) (6) Ritual. Oil was poured on or mixed with the flour or meal used in offerings. ( Leviticus 8:12 ) Kings, priests and prophets were anointed with oil or ointment. (7) In offerings. As so important a necessary of life, the Jew was required to include oil among his firstfruit offerings. ( Exodus 22:29 ; 23:16 ; Numbers 18:12 ) Tithes of oil were also required. ( 12:17 ) [OLIVE] biblestudytools.com
  23. Only olive oil seems to have been used among the Hebrews. It was used for many purposes: for anointing the body or the hair ( Exodus 29:7 ; 2 Sam 14:2 ; Psalms 23:5 ; 92:10 ; 104:15 ; Luke 7:46 ); in some of the offerings ( Exodus 29:40 ; Leviticus 7:12 ; Numbers 6:15 ; 15:4 ), but was excluded from the sin-offering ( Leviticus 5:11 ) and the jealousy-offering ( Numbers 5:15 ); for burning in lamps ( Exodus 25:6 ; 27:20 ; Matthew 25:3 ); for medicinal purposes ( Isaiah 1:6 ; Luke 10:34 ; James 5:14 ); and for anointing the dead ( Matthew 26:12 ; Luke 23:56 ). It was one of the most valuable products of the country ( Deuteronomy 32:13 ; Ezekiel 16:13 ), and formed an article of extensive commerce with Tyre ( 27:17 ). The use of it was a sign of gladness ( Psalms 92:10 ; Isaiah 61:3 ), and its omission a token of sorrow ( 2 Samuel 14:2 ; Matthew 6:17 ). It was very abundant in Galilee. (See OLIVE .) biblestudytools.com
  24. Any one of a great variety of unctuous combustible substances, more viscous than and not miscible with water; as, olive oil, whale oil, rock oil, etc. They are of animal, vegetable, or mineral origin and of varied composition, and they are variously used for food, for solvents, for anointing, lubrication, illumination, etc. By extension, any substance of an oily consistency; as, oil of vitriol. dictgcide_fs
  25. oil, n. the juice from the fruit of the olive-tree: any greasy liquid.--v.t. to smear or anoint with oil.--ns. OIL'BAG, a bag or cyst in animals containing oil; OIL'CAKE, a cake made of flax seed from which the oil has been pressed out; OIL'CLOTH, a painted floorcloth; OIL'-COL'OUR, a colouring substance mixed with oil; OIL'ER, one who, or that which, oils: an oil-can: (coll.) a coat of oilskin; OIL'ERY, the commodities of an oil-man; OIL'-GAS, illuminating gas or heating gas made by distilling oil in closed retorts; OIL'INESS; OIL'-MAN, one who deals in oils; OIL'-MILL, a grinding-mill for expressing oil from seeds, nuts, &c.; OIL'NUT, the butter-nut of North America; OIL'-PAINT'ING, a picture painted in oil-colours: the art of painting in oil-colours; OIL'-PALM, a palm whose fruit-pulp yields palm-oil; OIL'-PRESS, a machine for expressing oils from seeds or pulp; OIL'SKIN, cloth made waterproof by means of oil: a garment made of oilskin; OIL'-SPRING, a spring whose water contains oily matter: a fissure or area from which petroleum, &c. oozes; OIL'STONE, a fine-grained kind of stone used, when wetted with oil, for sharpening tools; OIL'-WELL, a boring made for petroleum.--adj. OIL'Y, consisting of, containing, or having the qualities of oil: greasy.--STRIKE OIL (see STRIKE). [O. Fr. oile (Fr. huile)--L. oleum--Gr. elaion--elaia, the olive.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  26. A collective name, under which two classes of fluids are included, very different from each other: those belonging to the one class, are viscid, mawkish or almost insipid; those of the other are nearly devoid of viscidity, and are caustic and very volatile. The former are called fat or fixed oils; the latter volatile or essential oils or essences. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  27. (Kinds of) liquid viscid unctuous inflammable chemically neutral substance lighter than& insoluble in water& soluble in alcohol& ether (there are three classes: fatty or fixed oo. of animal or vegetable origin, greasy& non-distillable, subdivided into drying oo., which by exposure harden into varnish, & non-drying oo., which by exposure ferment, the latter used as lubricants, illuminants, soap constituents, &c.; essential or volatile oo. chiefly of vegetable origin, acrid, limpid, & distillable, giving plants &c. their scent, used in medicine& perfumery; mineral oo. used as illuminants. Particular kinds are named from source with of, as o. of almonds, or with source or use preceding, as cod-liver, olive, salad, hair, o. Pour o. on the flame &c., aggravate passion &c.; pour o. on the waters, smooth matters over; smell of o., bear marks of study; burn the midnight o., read or work far into the night; strike o. lit., find petroleum by sinking shaft, fig., attain prosperity or success; strap &c. -o., flogging with strap &c.); = o.-colour (often pl.); = oilskin (usu. pl.); o.-bird, -nut, -palm, -plant, -seed, -tree, kinds of bird &c. from which o. is got; o.-bush, o.-filled socket for upright spindle[BUSH]; oilcake, mass of compressed linseed &c. left when o. has been expressed, used as cattle food or manure; o.-can, containing o., esp. long-nozzled for oiling machinery; oilcloth, fabric waterproofed with o., oilskin, canvas coated with drying o. & used to cover table or floor; o.-coat, of oilskin; o.-colour, paint made by grinding pigment in o. (usu. pl.); o.-field, district yielding mineral o.; o.-gauge, hydrometer measuring specific gravity of oo.; o.-gilding, -gold, goldleaf laid on linseed-o. mixed with yellow pigment; o.-gland, secreting o.; o.-hole, in machinery to receive lubricating o.; oilman, maker or seller of oo.; o.-meal, ground linseed cake; o.-paint, =o.-colour; o.-painting, art of painting, picture painted, in o.-colours; o.-paper, made transparent or waterproof by soaking in o.; o.-press, apparatus for pressing o. from seeds &c.; oilskin, cloth waterproofed with o., garment or (pl.) suit of this; o.-spring, yielding mineral o.; oilstone, (fine-grained stone used with o. as) whetstone. Hence oilless a. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  28. Apply o. to, lubricate, (o. the wheels, lit., & fig. make things go smoothly by courtesy, bribery, &c.; o. one\'s hand or o. one, bribe him; o. one\'s tongue, say smooth things, flatter); (with butter, grease, &c., as subj. or obj.) turn (t. & i.) into oily liquid; impregnate or treat with o. (oiled sardines; oiled silk, waterproofed with o.). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  29. o. & vinegar, type of dissimilar or incompatible or mutually repugnant things. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  30. An inflammable liquid not miscible with water. American pocket medical dictionary.
  31. A more or less greasy liquid or viscous substance, of animal or vegetable origin, composed of glycerin combined chemically with an animal or vegetable acid. In a more comprehensive sense the term includes, besides the fluid fixed o's and the volatile o's, the waxes, solid fats, tallows, and mineral hydrocarbons, all of which, though differing widely in physical and chemical characters, possess the property of ready inflammability and are compounds chiefly of carbon and hydrogen. They are also mostly insoluble in water. [Lat.] Appleton's medical dictionary.
  32. Any substance of an oily consistence, such as sulphuric acid (o. of vitriol). [Lat.] Appleton's medical dictionary.
  33. n. [Anglo-Saxon, French, Latin, Greek] An unctuous inflammable liquid expressed or drawn from various animal and vegetable substances. Cabinet Dictionary

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