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Definitions of rove

  1. move about aimlessly or without any destination, often in search of food or employment; "The gypsies roamed the woods"; "roving vagabonds"; "the wandering Jew"; "The cattle roam across the prairie"; "the laborers drift from one town to the next". Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. of Reeve Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To draw through an eye or aperture. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To draw out into flakes; to card, as wool. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To twist slightly; to bring together, as slivers of wool or cotton, and twist slightly before spinning. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. A copper washer upon which the end of a nail is clinched in boat building. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. A roll or sliver of wool or cotton drawn out and slighty twisted, preparatory to further process; a roving. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To practice robbery on the seas; to wander about on the seas in piracy. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. Hence, to wander; to ramble; to rauge; to go, move, or pass without certain direction in any manner, by sailing, walking, riding, flying, or otherwise. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To shoot at rovers; hence, to shoot at an angle of elevation, not at point-blank (rovers usually being beyond the point-blank range). Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To wander over or through. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To plow into ridges by turning the earth of two furrows together. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. The act of wandering; a ramble. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  14. To wander or ramble. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. To wander or ramble over; roam over; to draw out and join together, as fibers of wool or cotton, before spinning. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. To rob: to wander over like robbers. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  17. To wander about: to ramble: to range. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  18. To wander about. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  19. To wander through. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  20. To roam over or about. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  21. To wander. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. To wander over. See Rob. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  23. To draw, as a thread or cord through an eye or aperture. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  24. To wander, range, or stray about at large. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  25. Did reeve. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  26. To draw through an aperture or eye, as wool or cotton; in Scot., to card wool or cotton into flakes; in prov. Eng., to turn into thread, as "to rove a stocking". Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  27. A roll of wool drawn out and slightly twisted. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  28. To move about without certain direction in any manner; to wander; to ramble. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  29. r[=o]v, v.t. to wander over: to plough into ridges.--v.i. to wander about: to ramble: to range: to aim, as in archery, at some casual mark: to be light-headed: to be full of fun.--n. a wandering.--ns. R[=O]'VER, one who roves: a robber or pirate: a wanderer: an inconstant person: in archery, a person shooting with a long bow and arrow: an arrow used by a rover: an irregular point to be aimed at: in croquet, a ball that has gone through all the hoops; R[=O]'VERY; R[=O]'VING, the act of wandering.--adv. R[=O]'VINGLY.--n. R[=O]'VINGNESS.--SHOOT AT ROVERS, to shoot at random. [M. E. rover, a robber--Dut. roover, a pirate, rooven, to rob--roof. The verb rove is from the noun roof, plunder.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  30. r[=o]v, v.t. to draw through an eye: to bring wool into the form it receives before being spun into thread: to ravel out thread: to undo what has been knit: to card.--n. a roll of wool or cotton drawn out and twisted.--ns. R[=O]'VING, the process of giving the first twist to yarn: a slightly twisted sliver of carded fibre; R[=O]'VING-FRAME, a machine for the manufacture of cotton and worsted; R[=O]'VING-MACHINE', a machine for winding on bobbins; R[=O]'VING-PLATE, a scraper used for giving a grindstone a true circular form; R[=O]'VING-REEL, a device for measuring a hank of yarn. [Prob. a variant of reeve or of rive.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  31. Scab. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  32. Wander without settled destination, roam, ramble (roving sailor, kinds of creeper), (of eyes) look in changing directions; wander over or through; (Angling) troll with live bait; (n.) act of roving (esp. on the r.). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  33. Sliver of cotton, wool, &c., drawn out& slightly twisted. (Vb) form into rr.; hence rover n. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  34. Small metal plate or ring for rivet to pass through& be clinched over. [old Norse] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  35. (Naut.) See Reeve. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  36. A roll of wool drawn out and slightly twisted, for spinning into thread or yarn. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  37. n. A roll of wool drawn out and slightly twisted: a sub. Cabinet Dictionary

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