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Definitions of silver

  1. a soft white precious univalent metallic element having the highest electrical and thermal conductivity of any metal; occurs in argentite and in free form; used in coins and jewelry and tableware and photography Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. lustrous gray; covered with or tinged with the color of silver; "silvery hair" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a light shade of gray Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. expressing yourself readily, clearly, effectively; "able to dazzle with his facile tongue"; "silver speech" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. silverware eating utensils Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. coat with a layer of silver or a silver amalgam; "silver the necklace" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. coins made of silver Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. having the white lustrous sheen of silver; "a land of silver (or silvern) rivers where the salmon leap"; "repeated scrubbings have given the wood a silvery sheen" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. made from or largely consisting of silver; "silver bracelets" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. turn silver, as of hair Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a medal made of silver (or having the appearance of silver) that is usually awarded for winning second place in a competition Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. turn silver; "The man's hair silvered very attractively" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. make silver in color; "Her worries had silvered her hair" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. Sweet; gentle; peaceful. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To cover with silver; to give a silvery appearance to by applying a metal of a silvery color; as, to silver a pin; to silver a glass mirror plate with an amalgam of tin and mercury. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To polish like silver; to impart a brightness to, like that of silver. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To make hoary, or white, like silver. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To acquire a silvery color. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A soft white metallic element, sonorous, ductile, very malleable, and capable of a high degree of polish. It is found native, and also combined with sulphur, arsenic, antimony, chlorine, etc., in the minerals argentite, proustite, pyrargyrite, ceragyrite, etc. Silver is one of the "noble" metals, so-called, not being easily oxidized, and is used for coin, jewelry, plate, and a great variety of articles. Symbol Ag (Argentum). Atomic weight 107.7. Specific gravity 10.5. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. Coin made of silver; silver money. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. Anything having the luster or appearance of silver. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. The color of silver. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Of or pertaining to silver; made of silver; as, silver leaf; a silver cup. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. Resembling silver. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. Bright; resplendent; white. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. Precious; costly. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. Giving a clear, ringing sound soft and clear. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. A precious, soft, white, ductile, metallic element; silverware, money, etc., made of this metal; the color of this metal. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  29. Pertaining to, or made of, silver; like silver in color or sound; as, silver hair, or silver tones. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  30. To cover or coat with silver or a substance resembling silver; to make bright or white like silver. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  31. To divide into long, thin pieces. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  32. A splinter; a sharp, thin, pointed piece, as of wood. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  33. Argentum; a metal of lustrous white color, of a specific gravity of 10.4 to 10.7; one of the elements, symbol Ag, atomic weight 107.88. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  34. See Argentum. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  35. A soft white metal, capable of a high polish: money made of silver: anything having the appearance of silver. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  36. Made of silver: resembling silver: white: bright: precious: gentle. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  37. To cover with silver: to make like silver: to make smooth and bright: to make silvery. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  38. Made of, or like, silver; white. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  39. Precious metal of a white color; money of silver. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  40. To cover with silver; make silvery or white. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  41. To plate with silver; give a silvery hue to. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  42. Made of silver or resembling silver; having a pure bell like tone. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  43. A white, ductile metallic element; one of the precious metals; silver coin or silverware. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  44. Made of silver; like silver; white like silver; of a pale lustre; bright; soft. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  45. A valuable metal of a brilliant white colour; coin made of silver; money; a silver vessel; anything like silver. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  46. To cover with silver; to cover with tinfoil amalgamated with quicksilver; to make smooth and bright; to make hoary. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  47. A well-known metal of a peculiar white colour, having a brilliant lustre, malleable, ductile, and soft when pure; one of the perfect metals; money made of silver; anything having the lustre or soft splendour of silver. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  48. White like silver; made of silver; soft and clear, as in the tones of the voice. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  49. To cover or coat with silver; to cover with an amalgam of tin and quicksilver; to adorn with mild or silver-like lustre; to make hoary. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  50. In very early times silver was used for ornaments, ( Genesis 24:53 ) and for vessels of various kinds. Images for idolatrous worship were made of silver or overlaid with it, ( Exodus 20:23 ; Hosea 13:2 ); Habb 2:19 Bar. 6:39, and the manufacture of silver shrines for Diana was a trade in Ephesus. ( Acts 19:24 ) But its chief use was as a medium of exchange, and throughout the Old Testament we find "silver" used for money, like the French argent . Silver was brought to Solomon from Arabia, ( 2 Chronicles 9:14 ) and from Tarshish, ( 2 Chronicles 9:21 ) which supplied the markets of Tyre. ( Ezekiel 27:12 ) From Tarshish it came int he form of plates, ( Jeremiah 10:9 ) like those on which the sacred books of the Singhalese are written to this day. Spain appears to have been the chief source whence silver was obtained by the ancients. Possibly the hills of Palestine may have afforded some supply of this metal. Silvers mixed with alloy is referred to in ( Jeremiah 6:30 ) and a finer kind, either purer in itself or more thoroughly purified, is mentioned in ( Proverbs 8:19 ) biblestudytools.com
  51. used for a great variety of purposes, as may be judged from the frequent references to it in Scripture. It first appears in commerce in Genesis 13:2 ; Genesis 23:15 Genesis 23:16 . It was largely employed for making vessels for the sanctuary in the wilderness ( Exodus 26:19 ; 27:17 ; Numbers 7:13 Numbers 7:19 ; 10:2 ). There is no record of its having been found in Syria or Palestine. It was brought in large quantities by foreign merchants from abroad, from Spain and India and other countries probably. biblestudytools.com
  52. A soft white metallic element, sonorous, ductile, very malleable, and capable of a high degree of polish. It is found native, and also combined with sulphur, arsenic, antimony, chlorine, etc., in the minerals argentite, proustite, pyrargyrite, ceragyrite, etc. Silver is one of the Argentum). Atomic weight 107.7. Specific gravity 10.5. dictgcide_fs
  53. sil'v[.e]r, n. a soft white metal, capable of a high polish: money made of silver: anything having the appearance of silver.--adj. made of silver: resembling silver: white: bright: precious: gentle: having a soft and clear tone: of high rank, but still second to the highest.--v.t. to cover with silver: to make like silver: to make smooth and bright: to make silvery.--v.i. to become silvery.--ns. SIL'VER-BATH (phot.), a solution of silver-nitrate for sensitising collodion-plates for printing; SIL'VER-BEAT'ER, one who beats out silver into thin foil.--adjs. SIL'VER-BLACK, black silvered over with white; SIL'VER-BRIGHT (Shak.), as bright as silver; SIL'VER-BUS'KINED, having buskins adorned with silver.--ns. SIL'VER-FIR, a coniferous tree of the genus Abies, whose leaves show two silvery lines on the under side; SIL'VER-FISH, a name given to the atherine, to artificially bred gold-fish, the sand-smelt, the tarpon: any species of Lepisma, a thysanurous insect--also Bristletail, Walking-fish, Silver-moth, Shiner, &c.; SIL'VER-FOX, a species of fox found in northern regions, having a rich and valuable fur; SIL'VER-GLANCE, native silver sulphide; SIL'VER-GRAIN, the medullary rays in timber.--adjs. SIL'VER-GRAY, having a gray or bluish-gray colour; SIL'VER-HAIRED, having white or lustrous gray hair; SIL'VER-HEAD'ED, having a silver head: with white hair.--ns. SIL'VERINESS, the state of being silvery; SIL'VERING, the operation of covering with silver: the silver so used.--v.t. SIL'VERISE, to coat or cover with silver:--pr.p. sil'ver[=i]sing; pa.p. sil'ver[=i]sed.--ns. SIL'VERITE, one who opposes the demonetisation of silver; SIL'VER-LEAF, silver beaten into thin leaves; SIL'VERLING (B.), a small silver coin.--adv. SIL'VERLY (Shak.), with the appearance of silver.--adjs. SIL'VERN, made of silver; SIL'VER-PL[=A]'TED, plated with silver.--n. SIL'VER-PRINT'ING, the production of photographic prints by the use of a sensitising salt of silver.--adj. SIL'VER-SHAFT'ED, carrying silver arrows, as Diana.--ns. SIL'VERSMITH, a smith who works in silver; SIL'VER-STICK, an officer of the royal palace--from his silvered wand.--adjs. SIL'VER-TONGUED, plausible, eloquent; SIL'VER-VOICED (Shak.), having a clear, sweet voice like the sound of a silver musical instrument; SIL'VER-WHITE (Shak.), white like silver; SIL'VERY, covered with silver: resembling silver: white: clear, soft, mellow. [A.S. silfer, seolfor; Ice. silfr, Ger. silber.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  54. Argentum-s. Ammonio-chloride of, see Argentum- s. Chloride of, see Argentum- s. Chloruret of, see Argentum-s. Cyanide of, see Argentum- s. Cyanuret of, see Argentum- s. Iodide of, see Argentum- s. Loduret of, see Argentum. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  55. A white lustrous precious metal used chiefly with alloy of harder metals for coin, plate, & ornament, & in chem. combinations for photography &c. (German s., nickel s., &c., white alloys used as substitutes for s. in table articles &c., or for coating with s.; fulminating s., an explosive powder; oxidized s.); s. coins (have you any s. on you?); s. vessels or implements or articles of furniture (melted down all his s. in the king\'s service); any of the salts of s. used in sensitizing photographic paper; (attrib.; usu. now preferred to silvern a. archaic see -en) made of s., second-best, (the s. age, see brazen, also spec. the period of Latin literature that followed the Augustan; so s. Latin; a s. cup; speech is s. or silvern, but silence is golden, better be silent than speak), (as substitute for silvery a., whence silveriness n.) resembling s. in whiteness, lustre, ringing sound, &c. (s. hair, white& lustrous; has a s. or silvery tone; has a s. tongue, is eloquent, whence silver-tongued a.; every cloud has as. lining, misfortune has its consolations); s.-bath. (tray for holding) solution of s. nitrate used for sensitizing; s. fir, kind with two s. lines on under side of leaves; s.-fish, kinds of fish, esp. a colourless variety of gold-fish; s.-foil; s.-fox, variety of common fox with black grey-tipped fur; s.-gilt, s. gilded over, also imitation gilding of yellow lacquer over s.-leaf; s.-grey, lustrous grey; s.-leaf; s.-paper, fine white tissue-paper, (loosely) tin-foil; s. plate, ware coated with s.; s.-point, (process of sketching on prepared paper with) s.-pointed style (a head in s.-p.); s.-print, photographic positive on paper sensitized by a salt of s.; s.-side, best side of round of beef; silversmith, worker in s., manufacturer of s. articles; s. solder, solder for joining s.; s. standard, use of s. money alone as full legal tender; s.-stick, field-officer of Life-guards on palace duty; s.-top, a disease in grasses; s.-weed, yellow-flowered roadside plant with silvery lower leaf-surfaces. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  56. Coat or plate with s.; provide (mirror-glass) with backing of tin-foil, mercury, &c.; (of moon or white light) give silvery appearance to; (with hair as obj. or subj.) turn (t. & i.) grey or white. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  57. A white metal; symbol Ag. American pocket medical dictionary.
  58. A metal occurring in nature both uncombined and in combination, in the latter case usually as a sulphid. It is a good conductor of heat and electricity. It is not changed by the atmosphere, though it may be altered by hydrogen sulphid. It usually forms strong coherent solid masses, but it may be obtained as a fine dark powder (molecular s.), and it is also found in the crystalline form. Atomic weight, 107.9. Specific gravity, 10.5. Symbol, Ag., from Lat., argentum. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  59. Under the law of April 2, 1792, first of the coinage laws, the ratio between silver and gold was made one to fifteen. Silver bullion could be presented for coinage into lawful money, 1485 parts pure to 179 parts alloy, one-ninth being retained for coinage expense. The law of March 3, 1795, caused two cents per ounce to be charged for coining silver bullion below the standard. April 21, 1800, it was enacted that a sum equivalent to the expense of refining should be retained for coining silver below the standard. May 19, 1828, the law provided for coining silver below the standard a charge equal to expense of materials and a charge for wastage. June 28, 1834, a certain deduction (one-half per cent) was made for coining standard silver, if paid in coin five days after deposit. January 18, 1837, the standard silver coin was made nine-tenths pure and one-tenth alloy, and silver coins were to be legal tender for any amount. The dollar weighed 412 ⅓ grains. By the law of February 21, 1853, the weight of the half dollar was reduced from 206 ¼ to 192 grains, and it was made legal tender to the amount of only $5. No private deposits for such coinage were to be received, but the mint was to purchase bullion and turn out coins to be exchanged with gold at par value in sums not exceeding $100. February 12, 1873, the law made the weight of the trade dollar 420 grains, the half dollar 193.75 grains. Silver bullion could be deposited for coinage into trade dollars only, and the mint was to purchase bullion for the coinage of coins less than $1.00. By the law of July 22, 1877, the trade dollar ceased to be a legal tender. By the law of February 28, 1878, silver dollars of the weight of 412 ½ grains were made legal tender for all debts and the treasury was to purchase and coin not less than $2,000,000 worth of bullion per month and not more than $4,000,000. June 2, 1879, silver coins less than $1.00 were made legal tender to the amount of $10. By the law of July 14, 1890, the Secretary of the Treasury was directed to purchase at market price silver bullion to the amount of 4,500,000 ounces per month, issuing in payment treasury notes, to be a legal tender for debt. So much bullion was to be coined as might redeem these notes, and the Act of 1878 was repealed. In 1893 the silver-purchase clause of this act was repealed. (For the history of the individual silver coins see Dollar, Trade Dollar, Half Dollar, Quarter Dollar, Twenty-Cent Piece, Dime, Five-Cent Piece and Three-Cent Piece.) Dictionary of United States history
  60. n. [Anglo Saxon, Icelandic, Dutch] A soft, white, metallic element, very malleable and ductile, and capable of a high polish;— coin made of silver; silver money;-any thing having the lustre or appearance of silver. Cabinet Dictionary

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