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Definitions of pet

  1. a special loved one Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. preferred above all others and treated with partiality; "the favored child" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. stroke or caress gently; "pet the lamb" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. using a computerized radiographic technique to examine the metabolic activity in various tissues (especially in the brain) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a domesticated animal kept for companionship or amusement Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a fit of petulance or sulkiness (especially at what is felt to be a slight) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. stroke or caress in an erotic manner, as during lovemaking Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. To treat as a pet; to fondle. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  9. A cade lamb; a lamb brought up by hand. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. Any person or animal especially cherished and indulged; a fondling; a darling; often, a favorite child. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. A slight fit of peevishness or fretfulness. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Petted; indulged; admired; cherished; as, a pet child; a pet lamb; a pet theory. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To treat as a pet; to fondle; to indulge; as, she was petted and spoiled. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To be a pet. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. Animals which have become adapted through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with man. They include animals domesticated by man to live and breed in a tame condition on farms or ranches (e.g., horses, cattle, sheep) and those raised or kept for pleasure and companionship (e.g., dogs, cats, horses). Medical Dictionary DB
  16. Any person or animal that is fondled or caressed; a sudden fit of peevishness. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. Favorite; accustomed to indulgence. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. To fondle or indulge. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  19. Any animal tame and fondled: a word of endearment often used to young children. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. To treat as a pet: to fondle:-pr.p. petting; pa.t. and pa.p. petted. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. A sudden fit of peevishness or slight passion. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. A fit of peevishness or slight anger. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  23. Any creature fondled or indulged; favorite. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  24. Favorite. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  25. Pettish. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  26. To treat as a pet; fondle. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. Being a pet; indulged; cherished. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. A creature fondled or cherished. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. A fit of ill temper; peevishness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. A cade lamb; a foundling; a darling; a fit of peevishness or fretful discontent. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  31. A fit of slight passion or sulks; a fit of peevishness; any animal fondled or indulged; a word of endearment applied to young children. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  32. To indulge in pets or fits of ill-humour, as a child; to fondle or indulge. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  33. pet, n. any animal tame and fondled: a word of endearment often used to young children: a favourite child: a wilful young woman--also PEAT.--adj. indulged: cherished: favourite.--v.t. to treat as a pet: to fondle:--pr.p. pet'ting; pa.t. and pa.p. pet'ted. [Celt., as Ir. peat, Gael. peata.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  34. pet, n. a sudden fit of peevishness or slight passion: ill-humour.--v.i. to be peevish, to sulk. [From the above word.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  35. Animal tamed& kept as favourite or treated with fondness; darling, favourite, (often attrib.); one\'s p. aversion, what one specially dislikes; p. name, one expressing fondness or familiarity; (v.t.) treat as a p., fondle. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  36. Offence at being slighted, ill-humour, esp. take (usu. the) p., be in a p. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  37. n. A slight fit of peevishness. Cabinet Dictionary
  38. n. [F.] A little fondling or darling; a favourite; a lamb brought up by hand;—any little animal fondled and indulged;—one who is treated with constant gentle attention. Cabinet Dictionary

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