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Definitions of yard

  1. the cardinal number that is the product of 10 and 100 Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a unit of volume (as for sand or gravel) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the enclosed land around a house or other building; "it was a small house with almost no yard" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a unit of length equal to 3 feet; defined as 91.44 centimeters; originally taken to be the average length of a stride Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. an area having a network of railway tracks and sidings for storage and maintenance of cars and engines Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. an enclosure for animals (as chicken or livestock) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a long horizontal spar tapered at the end and used to support and spread a square sail or lateen Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a tract of land enclosed for particular activities (sometimes paved and usually associated with buildings); "they opened a repair yard on the edge of town" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. A place where moose or deer herd together in winter for pasture, protection, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A rod; a stick; a staff. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. A branch; a twig. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. A long piece of timber, as a rafter, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. A long piece of timber, nearly cylindrical, tapering toward the ends, and designed to support and extend a square sail. A yard is usually hung by the center to the mast. See Illust. of Ship. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. An inclosure; usually, a small inclosed place in front of, or around, a house or barn; as, a courtyard; a cowyard; a barnyard. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. An inclosure within which any work or business is carried on; as, a dockyard; a shipyard. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To confine (cattle) to the yard; to shut up, or keep, in a yard; as, to yard cows. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A measure of length equal to three feet, thirty-six inches, or 0.9144 meter: a long piece of timber attached to the mast of a vessel to support a sail; an inclosed space before or about a house, barn, etc.; an inclosure where a special industry is carried on; as, a lumber yard. etc. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. A measure of three feet, about three inches less than a meter. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  19. An E. measure of 8 feet or 36 inches: a long beam on a mast for spreading square sails. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. An inclosed place, esp. near a building. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. Measure of three feet; spar for extending a square sail: inclosed ground near a building. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  22. The standard English measure of length; 36 inches. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. A spar suspended crosswise on a mast. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. A tract of ground enclosed near a residence or other building. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. A measure or a measuring rod of three feet or thirty-six inches; a long, slender piece of timber, nearly cylindrical, suspended upon the mast, by which a sail is extended. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  26. A small, inclosed place in front of or around a house or barn; an enclosure for any purpose. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  27. To confine cattle to the yard. See Guard. Dock-yard, a place where ships are laid up. Prison-yard, an inclosure about a prison, or attached to it. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  28. A measure of length, equaling three feet, or thirty-six inches, being the standard of English and American measure. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. A staff; a rod; a measure of 3 feet, or 36 inches; in a ship, a long piece of timber, having a rounded taper towards each end, and slung by its centre to a mast. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  30. An enclosure in which any work is carried on; a small enclosed space adjoining a house or building; in Scot., a small enclosed garden. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  31. To put or confine cattle in a yard. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  32. A measure of length, containing three feet, or thirty-six inches.UA piece of land inclosed for the use and accommodation of the inhabitants of a house. thelawdictionary.org
  33. A measure of length, containing three feet, or thirty-six inches. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  34. yärd, n. an English measure of 3 feet or 36 inches: a long beam on a mast for spreading square sails: the penis.--ns. YARD'-ARM, either half of a ship's yard (right or left) from the centre to the end; YARD'STICK, a stick 3 feet long, any standard of measurement--also YARD'WAND. [A.S. gyrd, gierd, a rod, measure; Dut. garde, Ger. gerte; further conn. with Goth. gazds, a stick, L. hasta, a spear.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  35. yärd, n. an enclosed place, esp. near a building, as 'prison-yard,' or where any special work is carried on, as 'brick-yard,' 'wood-yard,' 'dock-yard,' 'navy-yard:' a garden.--v.t. to enclose in a yard.--ns. YARD'AGE, the use of a yard, or the charge made for such: the cutting of coal at so much per yard; YARD'-LAND, the amount of land held by a tenant in villeinage, in older English usage, varying from 15 to 40 acres; YARD'MAN, the person having special charge of a farm-yard: one employed in a railway-yard in making up trains, &c.; YARD'-MAS'TER, one who has the special oversight of a railway-yard. [A.S. geard, hedge, enclosure; Ger. garten; conn. with L. hortus, Gr. chortos.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  36. A measure of 3 feet; as defined by English and American usage, an arbitrary measure equal to the length of a certain metallic standard preserved for reference in the offices of the respective governments. na
  37. The unit of long measure, = 3 ft, 36 in., or 1/1760 mile (abbr. yd; 100 yy., esp. flatrace distance; square, cubic, y.); y.-length of material (5 yy., a y. -&-a-half, of cloth); cylindrical spar tapering to each end slung horizontally (square y.) or slantwise (lateen y.) across mast to support sail (lower, topsail-, topgallant-, royal, y., according to sail supported; man the yy., place men, stand, along yy. as form of salute); (archaic) penis; y.-arm, either end of sail-y.; y.-measure, rod, tape, &c., a y. long& usu. divided into feet, inches, & quarters or fifths; y.-stick, -wand, rigid y.-measure. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  38. Piece of enclosed ground, especially one surrounded by or attached to building (s) or used for some manufacturing or other purpose often specified by combination with another word (CHURCH, COURT, DOCK, FARM, KALE, RICK, TIMBER, -y., VINEYARD; brick-y., where bricks are made; cab-y., where cabs are kept; railway-y., space near station where rolling-stock is kept, trains made up, &c.; stock-y., where cattle are penned; tan-y., tanning-ground); y.-man, -master, man working in, manager of, railway-y. (Vb) put (cattle) into stock-y., so yardage (4) n. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  39. A measure of three feet. See Weights and Measures, Table of. American pocket medical dictionary.
  40. (Naut.) A long spar suspended from a mast to spread a sail. Yard-arms, its extremities. Yard-arm and Yard-arm, said of two vessels close alongside. Cross-jack Yard, that on the foremast of a fore-and-aft schooner. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  41. [A.S.] The fundamental English unit of length ; it is the distance between two marks on a certain bar kept in the Exchequer Office in London, when the temperature is 62 Fahr. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  42. n. [Anglo-Saxon] A measure of length, three feet or thirty-six inches, being the standard of English measure;-also, a rod or stick of that length; yard-stick;-the penis;-a long, slender piece of timber, nearly cylindrical, suspended upon the mast, by which a sail is extended. Cabinet Dictionary
  43. n. [Anglo-Saxon] A small inclosed place in front of or around a house or barn; an inclosure within which any work or business is carried on, or in which material is stored. Cabinet Dictionary

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