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Definitions of coal

  1. burn to charcoal; "Without a drenching rain, the forest fire will char everything" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a hot glowing or smouldering fragment of wood or coal left from a fire Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. fossil fuel consisting of carbonized vegetable matter deposited in the Carboniferous period Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. take in coal, as of a ship Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. supply with coal Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. take in coal; "The big ship coaled" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  7. A thoroughly charred, and extinguished or still ignited, fragment from wood or other combustible substance; charcoal. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A black, or brownish black, solid, combustible substance, dug from beds or veins in the earth to be used for fuel, and consisting, like charcoal, mainly of carbon, but more compact, and often affording, when heated, a large amount of volatile matter. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To burn to charcoal; to char. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To mark or delineate with charcoal. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To supply with coal; as, to coal a steamer. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To take in coal; as, the steamer coaled at Southampton. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. A natural fuel formed by partial decomposition of vegetable matter under certain environmental conditions. Medical Dictionary DB
  14. A black, hard, combustible mineral, used as fuel. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. To furnish with coal. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. To take in coal. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  17. A solid, black, combustible substance used for fuel, dug out of the earth. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  18. Charred wood; a combustible fossil procured by mining. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  19. To supply with coal. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  20. A combustible substance derived from ancient vegetation, found in beds or veins in the earth; a piece of partly burned wood. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  21. Coaly. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. A piece of wood or other combustible substance, ignited, burning, or charred; a solid opaque combustible substance of vegetable origin found, in the earth, and extensively used for fuel. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  23. To burn to coal or charcoal; to mark or delineate with charcoal. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  24. To take in coal. To blow the coals, to stir up strife. To haul over the coals, to take one to task; to reprimand. To carry coals to Newcastle, to lose one's labour. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  25. Mineralised vegetable matter; a hard black mineral used as fuel. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  26. To take in coal for the supply of a steam or sailing vessel. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  27. The first and most frequent use of the word rendered coal is a live ember, burning fuel. ( Proverbs 26:21 ) In ( 2 Samuel 22:9 2 Samuel 22:13 ) "coals of fire" are put metaphorically for the lightnings proceeding from God. ( Psalms 18:8 Psalms 18:12 Psalms 18:13 ; 140:10 ) In ( Proverbs 26:21 ) fuel not yet lighted is clearly signified. The fuel meant in the above passage is probably charcoal, and not coal in our sense of the word. biblestudytools.com
  28. It is by no means certain that the Hebrews were acquainted with mineral coal, although it is found in Syria. Their common fuel was dried dung of animals and wood charcoal. Two different words are found in Hebrew to denote coal, both occurring in Proverbs 26:21 , "As coal [Heb. peham; i.e., "black coal"] is to burning coal [Heb. gehalim]." The latter of these words is used in Job 41:21 ; Proverbs 6:28 ; Isaiah 44:19 . The words "live coal" in Isaiah 6:6 are more correctly "glowing stone." In Lamentations 4:8 the expression "blacker than a coal" is literally rendered in the margin of the Revised Version "darker than blackness." "Coals of fire" ( 2 Samuel 22:9 2 Samuel 22:13 ; Psalms 18:8 Psalms 18:12 Psalms 18:13 , etc.) is an expression used metaphorically for lightnings proceeding from God. A false tongue is compared to "coals of juniper" ( Psalms 120:4 ; James 3:6 ). "Heaping coals of fire on the head" symbolizes overcoming evil with good. The words of Paul ( Romans 12:20 ) are equivalent to saying, "By charity and kindness thou shalt soften down his enmity as surely as heaping coals on the fire fuses the metal in the crucible." biblestudytools.com
  29. k[=o]l, n. a solid, black, combustible substance used for fuel, dug out of the earth: cinder.--v.i. to take in coal.--v.t. to supply with coal.--n. COAL'-BED, a stratum of coal.--adj. COAL'-BLACK, black as coal, very black.--ns. COAL'-BOX, a box for holding coal; COAL'-BRASS, a name applied to the pyrites in the coal-measures; COAL'FIELD, a field or district containing coal strata; COAL'-FISH, a fish of the cod family, so named from the black colour of its back; COAL'-GAS, the mixture of gases produced by the destructive distillation of coal, chiefly carburetted hydrogen--giving the gaslight in common use; COAL'-HEAV'ER, one employed in carrying coal; COAL'-HOUSE, a covered-in place for keeping coal; COAL'MAN, one who has to do with coals; COAL'-MAS'TER, the owner or lessee of a coalfield; COAL'-MEAS'URE, a measure by which the quantity of coal is ascertained: (pl.) the group of carboniferous strata in which coal is found (geol.); COAL'-MINE, COAL'-PIT, a pit or mine from which coal is dug; COAL'-OWN'ER, one who owns a colliery; COAL'-PLANT, a fossil plant of the carboniferous strata; COAL'-SCUTT'LE, a vessel for holding coal; COAL'-TAR, or Gas-tar, a thick, black, opaque liquid which condenses in the pipes when coal or petroleum is distilled; COAL'-TRIM'MER, one who stores or shifts coal on board vessels; COAL'-WHIP'PER, one employed in unloading coal from vessels at anchor to barges which convey it to the wharves.--adj. COAL'Y, of or like coal.--COALING STATION, a port at which steamships take in coal; COAL-SCUTTLE BONNET, a woman's bonnet, shaped like a coal-scuttle upside down.--BLIND or ANTHRACITE COAL, that which does not flame when kindled; BITUMINOUS COAL, that which does; BROWN COAL (see BROWN); CAKING COAL, a bituminous coal which cakes or fuses into one mass in the fire; CANNEL or PARROT COAL (see CANNEL); CHERRY or SOFT COAL, coal breaking off easily into small, irregular cubes, having beautiful shining lustre; SPLINT, HARD, or BLOCK COAL, plentiful in Scotland, hard, breaking into cuboidal blocks.--BLOW THE COALS, to excite passion; CARRY COALS TO NEWCASTLE, to take a thing where it is least needed; HAUL OVER THE COALS, reprimand--from the discipline applied to heretics; HEAP COALS OF FIRE ON THE HEAD, to excite remorse by returning good for evil (Rom. xii. 20). [A.S. col; cog. with Ice. kol, Ger. kohle.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  30. Hard opaque black or blackish mineral of carbonized vegetable matter found in seams or strata below earth\'s surface& used as fuel& in manufacture of gas, tar, &c. (cc., pieces of it ready for supplying fire; chief kinds, ANTHRACITE, BITUMINOUS, LIGNITE; heap cc. of fire, return good for evil, cf. Roman xii. 20; blow the cc., fan flame of passion &c.; haul, call, over the cc., reprimand; cc. to Newcastle, superfluous action); c.-bed, -seam, stratum of c.; c.-black, quite; c.-box, -scuttle, (vulg.) -vase, receptacle for c. to supply room fire (c.-scuttle bonnet, with front projection as of inverted c.-box); c.-BUNKER; c.-dust, small cc.; c.-factor, middleman between c.-owners& customers; c.-field, district with series of c. strata; c.-fish, black cod; c.-flap, -plate, cover of c.-cellar opening in pavement; c.-gas, mixed gases extracted from c. & used for lighting& heating; c.-heaver, man employed in moving c.; c.-hole, small c.-cellar; c.-master, -owner, owner or lessee of c.-mine or c.-pit =COLLIERY; c.-measure (geol.), series of rocks formed by seams of c. & intervening strata; c.-screen, frame for parting large from small cc.; c.-tar, TAR extracted from bituminous c., & yielding paraffin, naphtha, benzene, creosote, & aniline dyes; c.-tit, =COALMOUSE; c. -whipper, man, machine, raising c. from ship\'s hold; hence coalless, coaly, aa. (Vb) put c. into (ship &c.); take in supply of c. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  31. The charred or incandescent mass left after the incomplete combustion of any material, such as wood, consisting largely of carbon. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  32. A black or brownish, amorphous, combustible substance, consisting chiefly of carbon, but generally harder and more compact, and containing bitumen and earthy impurities. It is the result of the transformation of vegetable matter, mainly woody fiber, into a substance richer in carbon by the partial elimination of oxygen and hydrogen. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  33. The first organized effort to mine anthracite coal was in 1793 on the Mammoth bed at Summit Hill, near Mauch Chunk, Pennsylvania, but regular shipments did not begin until 1820. It was not until 1825 that it was in general use for the generation of steam, and not until 1839 that it was employed as an exclusive fuel in the manufacture of pig iron. The industry in bituminous coal and coke was begun in Connellsville, PA., in 1841, by McCormick and Campbell. Regular manufacture commenced in that district in 1861. The coal-mining industry is now more or less prosperous in a very large number of the States and Territories, though Pennsylvania still holds the lead. The most recent extensive developments have been made in West Virginia. The total output of anthracite for 1889 exceeded 33,000,000 tons; the annual output of coke is also enormous. Dictionary of United States history
  34. n. [Anglo-Saxon] [Latin] A black, solid, combustible substance, consisting mainly of carbon, found embedded in the earth, and used for fuel; —wood charred is called charcoal. Cabinet Dictionary
  35. The common fossil fewel ; the cinder of burnt wood, charcoal. Complete Dictionary

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