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Definitions of coal

  1. To take in coal. To blow the coals, to stir up strife. To haul over the coals, to take one to task; to reprimand. To carry coals to Newcastle, to lose one's labour. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To supply with coal. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To burn to charcoal; to char. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To mark or delineate with charcoal. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To supply with coal; as, to coal a steamer. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To furnish with coal. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  7. To take in coal; as, the steamer coaled at Southampton. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To take in coal. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  9. supply with coal Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. To burn to coal or charcoal; to mark or delineate with charcoal. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  11. To take in coal for the supply of a steam or sailing vessel. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  12. take in coal; "The big ship coaled" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. A thoroughly charred, and extinguished or still ignited, fragment from wood or other combustible substance; charcoal. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. A black, or brownish black, solid, combustible substance, dug from beds or veins in the earth to be used for fuel, and consisting, like charcoal, mainly of carbon, but more compact, and often affording, when heated, a large amount of volatile matter. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. A black, hard, combustible mineral, used as fuel. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. A solid, black, combustible substance used for fuel, dug out of the earth. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  17. Charred wood; a combustible fossil procured by mining. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  18. A combustible substance derived from ancient vegetation, found in beds or veins in the earth; a piece of partly burned wood. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  19. A piece of wood or other combustible substance, ignited, burning, or charred; a solid opaque combustible substance of vegetable origin found, in the earth, and extensively used for fuel. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  20. Mineralised vegetable matter; a hard black mineral used as fuel. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  21. Coaly. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.

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Usage examples for coal

  1. Mr. Emerson turned the bit of coal over and over. – Ethel Morton's Enterprise by Mabell S.C. Smith
  2. It was as if I had put a live coal into my mouth. – Romance by Joseph Conrad and F.M. Hueffer
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