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Definitions of depose

  1. To bear witness. See Depone. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To deprive of rank or office; remove; degrade. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To state on oath; testify. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  4. To remove from a throne or other high station; to dethrone; to divest or deprive of office. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To put under oath. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To testify under oath; to bear testimony to; - now usually said of bearing testimony which is officially written down for future use. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To remove from a throne, or other high station; deprive of office; bear witness to. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8. To bring down from sovereignty or high station. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  9. To bear witness; to testify under oath; to make deposition. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. Testify on oath. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. To testify on oath. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  12. To remove from a throne or other high station; to divest of office; to depone. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  13. To degrade; to divest of office; to dethrone; to bear witness on oath. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  14. Deposition. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.

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Usage examples for depose

  1. Possibly the barons would depose Henry, and place a new king upon England's throne, and then De Vac would mock the Plantagenet to his face. – The Outlaw of Torn by Edgar Rice Burroughs
  2. And do you not know that he has addressed to the Hungarians a proclamation advising them to depose me without further ceremony, and elect another king, of course one of the new- fangled French princes? – Andreas Hofer by Lousia Muhlbach
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